What drill bit?

What drill bit?

PostBy: rberq On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 9:50 pm

I want drill five or six half-inch holes in my stove -- 3/16 steel. I see bits in the store labeled "black oxide", cobalt, and titanium. What should I use? Any brand name you particularly recommend?

Can I go with bigger holes than half-inch, or is that asking for trouble? I have a 3/8 inch variable speed drill, and I can borrow a half-inch.
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: Devil505 On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 9:53 pm

I remember seeing a thread where some did exactly that to install a hot water loop in his stove. I think it was last summer but I can't remember the thread or who did it??
Maybe some else remembers it?
Devil505
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: Poconoeagle On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 9:54 pm

titainum nitrided bits.... multi step process 3/16 then 3/8 then 1/2 slow rpm the biggest thing you can use is patience... 8-)
Poconoeagle
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Buckwalter & Co. , EFM520
Stove/Furnace Model: No. 28 Glenwood 1880, Alaska


Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: Steve.N On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:04 pm

Bigger holes the Lenox hole saws work great. Slow speed light pressure. I just drilled a 4 inch hole through 1 inch of cast steel and the saw would probably drill another.
Steve.N
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman mkII
Stove/Furnace Model: Axeman Anderson 260 at store

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: VigIIPeaBurner On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:10 pm

Poconoeagle wrote:titainum nitrided bits.... multi step process 3/16 then 3/8 then 1/2 slow rpm the biggest thing you can use is patience... 8-)


... and apply copious amounts of cutting oil to cool the bits under slow and steady pressure. Be ready if it catches a good bite.
VigIIPeaBurner
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker Koker
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Casting Vigilant II 2310
Other Heating: #2 Oil Furnace

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: 009to090 On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:19 pm

yes, lots of cutting oil, or if no cutting oil, have a buddy spray WD-40 on the bit continuosly while you drill. I've drilled as large as 1 1/4" through cast iron, but stepped it up one size at a time. Don't try to cut it all at once. I use a Milwalkie Hole Hog. It'll spin you around the bit, if bit bites in. :shock:

Chris F.
009to090
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520 HighBoy
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: DVC-500 x 2
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Rice

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: Freddy On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:21 pm

Yup, the larger the drill, the slower the speed. And less pressure as it's about to make it through or it'll take you for a ride. As suggested, a few steps makes it less work, yet is harder on the drills, but using a hand held drill you really almost have to do a couple smaller holes before the finish size.
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: Poconoeagle On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:21 pm

In my experience i use no oil thus the slow rpm, cause the nitride process which "plates" the titanium is done so as to allow the titanium to transfer the heat. other "high speed steel" bits create so much heat that yes the cuttilg oil helps much. cobalt is another coating to transfer heat as well as hardness but any bit will overheat reguardless of material or oil if it spins to fast..... slow is the way to go... pilot holes... what are the holes for?
Poconoeagle
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Buckwalter & Co. , EFM520
Stove/Furnace Model: No. 28 Glenwood 1880, Alaska

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:30 pm

Devil505 wrote:I remember seeing a thread where some did exactly that to install a hot water loop in his stove. I think it was last summer but I can't remember the thread or who did it??
Maybe some else remembers it?



This one?

The project has begun: Harman Mark III heating coil install
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: Devil505 On: Mon Feb 23, 2009 10:38 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:
Devil505 wrote:I remember seeing a thread where some did exactly that to install a hot water loop in his stove. I think it was last summer but I can't remember the thread or who did it??
Maybe some else remembers it?



This one?

The project has begun: Harman Mark III heating coil install




That/'s the one!! :up:
Devil505
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: jpete On: Tue Feb 24, 2009 12:32 am

3/16" is nothing. Chuck up a 1/2" drill and go to town. I wouldn't bother with step drilling until I got over a 1/2". At best just center punch then drill.

Or get one of those "Uni-bits". A little spendy but I love it for thin materials. Mine is .125" between steps so you'd put a nice chamfer on the hole at the same time.
jpete
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mk II
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Nut, Pea
Other Heating: Dino juice

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: ceccil On: Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:15 am

I installed a coil in my stove. All I used was a center punch and a metal hole saw. Worked fine and saw was still in good shape when I was done. Just keep the saw lubed and go slow. Actually I didn't even have any good cutting oil, so I used what I had available which happened to be bar oil for my chain saw. I have read that rubbing alchohol works well but I have not tried it.

Jeff
ceccil
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Mark III

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: rberq On: Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:04 pm

Thanks for all the replies. Lowe's carries the Lenox hole saws that several of you have recommended highly. They are inexpensive except for having to buy the arbor. They look so simple and innocent, though, that it's hard to imagine them going through plate steel.
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: whistlenut On: Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:14 pm

I like the hole saw method also. A lot less chance of snapping a bit, or going for a 'holehawg spin'. I'd like to watch those monsters from the World's Strongest Man Contest take on a hopped-up Milwaukee HoleHawg.....on a ten foot stepladder.
Plus, when you are done you will have a $25 arbor to start your set of Lenox Hole Saws!
Don't forget the cutting oil. The stove won't rust in that spot for 50 years.
whistlenut
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA130's,260's, AHS130&260's,EFM900,GJ&VanWert
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Franks Boiler,Itasca415,NYer130,Van Wert
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Yellow Flame
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska-4,Keystoker-2,
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Alaska,Gibraltor,Keystone,Vc Vigilant 2
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Van Wert, NYer's, Ford,Jensen.
Coal Size/Type: Rice,Buck,Pea,Nut&Stove
Other Heating: Oil HWBB

Re: What drill bit?

PostBy: 009to090 On: Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:21 pm

whistlenut wrote: or going for a 'holehawg spin'.


Good term.... yes the "HoleHawg" ride is one I highly recommend. Should be in every amusement park. Been on it once.... Gets your blood flowing REALLY fast! Its the broken ribs I could do without. :eek2: :woot:
009to090
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520 HighBoy
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: DVC-500 x 2
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Rice