curing times for newly installed firebricks

curing times for newly installed firebricks

PostBy: photoboy On: Mon Mar 02, 2009 3:51 pm

just installed some new firebricks in my stove with a hydraulic heat refractory cement. this is a chemically curing cement, correct? hard to get answers here i can understand with the language difference and all. so if that is correct, i should allow 5-7 days for it to dry, keeping it as moist and damp as possible in between to maximize its strength? what sort of break-in fires and for how long should i follow to prevent residual moisture from boiling over to steam and ruining my labor of love once i let her out to pasture again?

this website is a huge resource for someone so far from everything familiar.

will post pics of before and after when i have batteries for my camera (i'm a manual film guy, after all!)

-rick
photoboy
 

Re: curing times for newly installed firebricks

PostBy: samhill On: Mon Mar 02, 2009 4:20 pm

I don`t know what cement you used but all that I ever used was cured by gradually building up heat. I did some refractory work for US Steel & right after we were finished they would be put under pre-heat lids to dry out & get up to temp before dumping hot metal into them.
samhill
 
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Re: curing times for newly installed firebricks

PostBy: franco b On: Mon Mar 02, 2009 6:47 pm

There should be directions on the package of the cement you are using. If not, then I would think 7 days would be plenty. I don't think you have to keep it wet. Small fire at first.

Richard
franco b
 
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Re: curing times for newly installed firebricks

PostBy: Freddy On: Mon Mar 02, 2009 7:20 pm

It's only firebricks, not a floor that will hold an MRI machine. Slop it on, put the fire to it!
Freddy
 
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Re: curing times for newly installed firebricks

PostBy: 009to090 On: Mon Mar 02, 2009 7:31 pm

I agree with above posts.... All I ever did was start a small fire, almost immediately after 'cementing' the bricks together. Within 8 hours, I go to full load, no problem.
009to090
 
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Re: curing times for newly installed firebricks

PostBy: BobDavis On: Mon Mar 02, 2009 7:50 pm

I did some of refractory work with a plastic like refractory (AP Green vendor) in the raceway of a pusher bar reheat furnace in a rolling mill. We would jack hammer out the raceway then ram the refractory into the raceway on Saturday. After putting 1/4 inch holes every 6 inches to let the "moisture" out by running the fans with no or very low heat, we would start the furnace Sunday AM on low heat for 12 hours then gradually let it come up to heat for the Sunday night shift start. Usually got to 2000 by shift start. My guess is on your case the time it takes for the water to get out of the cement is the issue. I would think that would depend on the thickness of the cement. The porosity the bricks I would think are so porous by nature that the water would come out almost immediately. (that would be the water soaked up by the firebrick from the cement)

I am not sure how this relates to your problem but I think if you run the fans (if you have any) to dry it out for 12 hours then start with low heat.

BD
BobDavis
 
Stove/Furnace Make: None Yet

Re: curing times for newly installed firebricks

PostBy: photoboy On: Wed Mar 04, 2009 4:36 am

thanks everybody. one of the bricks did pop loose in one corner, but it's not going to go anywhere so i'll leave it for now. did a small fire last night for about an hour before going to bed and am slowly burning away today. that is when i heard the pop. overall it is looking good, though. this older design had rocks instead of brick that were loose in some places. plus a lot of old whatever cement had crumbled away. this oven grew up in the old east germany after the second war, and during these times, good raw materials were scarce, so i don't know what was used to repair it, but it has held up until now. so with the new bricks, covering the old cement with new fire cement and sealing the firebox (was really drafty before) a good cleaning above, and gasketing the door and cookplate, this oven burns a lot hotter with less fuel. plus there was no issue with my damper, the stove pipe was half-full with soot!
i apologize for the lack of quality of the first pic.
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