Feeder Rate

Feeder Rate

PostBy: rschoensta On: Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:47 am

Hi Jerry,

I just checked my first bunch of ashes and at least some of the time there is a fair amount of unburned or partially burned coal there.

I'll try and figure this out myself for now but I need to know the following.
Right now the feeder is set at the default which is 4min and 40?max

What do these numbers stand for aside from an indication of rate of feed?
Also is the feed either one or the other, or is it also anything in between, ie a variable feed rate.

With respect to the combustion blower, how many different settings does that have?

And the same questions with respect to the convection blowers?

Also how does the overall house insulation setting impact the above?

Thanks for all your other answers.

So far I am really happy with the stove.

The thermostat works great.

The house is nice and warm where it needs to be and with only a few registers the heat is spreading throughtout the house quite nicely.

(Right now all I have is 12"x14" floor vent above the furnace room (and 2 2-4"x12" vents) and I haven't hooked up the duct work to it yet.
rschoensta
 

PostBy: pvolcko On: Fri Oct 27, 2006 4:54 pm

I'm not Jerry, but I can help on this one. :)

Right now the feeder is set at the default which is 4min and 40?max
What do these numbers stand for aside from an indication of rate of feed?
Also is the feed either one or the other, or is it also anything in between, ie a variable feed rate.


They are a percentage of motor on time during a cycle. I don't recall the duration of a cycle off hand, it is something between 100 and 120 seconds believe.

The feed rate is variable. The thermostat will figure out the place between these two settings that keeps the temperature at your setpoint.

With respect to the combustion blower, how many different settings does that have? And the same questions with respect to the convection blowers?


On Leisure Line stoves the combustion motor is always running at 100%. The convection blower is speed controlled, as opposed to time proportioned like the stoker/feeder motor, and varies from roughly 40% to 100%. The speed it runs at is calculated by the thermostat based on the feed rate and a delay, to make sure the air chamber is hot enough so that the air blowing out is not cool.

Also how does the overall house insulation setting impact the above?


The HLF (Heat Loss Factor) setting is new and meant to allow users to make the thermostat more aggressive in dialing up higher feed rates when a setpoint change occurs. The result will be for the stove to get to higher feed rates faster and thus generate the desired heat faster. The default setting is 0 (off) and will behave like earlier models in this mode. There are three settings, 1 through 3, to dial up increasingly aggressive settings. Use of this setting should be limited since it can result in seemingly "eratic" behavior (large temperature overshoots, for example) in many circumstances.

Basically this should only be used if it is taking inordinately long, 2-3 hours for example, for a new setpoint temperature to be reached. Obviously if you're making 10 or 15 degree changes it can take a while for that new temperature to be met and wouldn't necessarily be a candidate for this setting. But if you're seeing those kind of times on 5 degree changes then you could try increasing this value to see if it helps.

If the stove's BTU output is too low for the space you might be able to get a some relief by using this setting too.

However, first steps should be to increase air circulation and increase insulation.

Glad you're happy with your purchase. :)
pvolcko
 

PostBy: Jerry & Karen On: Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:13 pm

Thanks Paul,
A little more practice and you'll be able to explain the thermostat as well as I.
Thanks again,
Jer
Jerry & Karen
 

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PostBy: rschoensta On: Sat Oct 28, 2006 3:44 pm

Thanks.

Here is another question.
If the combustion blower is running 100% of the time, what regulates the air flow to the fire.

I am guessing that the feeder must cover some of the air holes, aside from that what regulates the intensity of the fire.

I would think that a greater feed rate would require more air and a lower feed rate less, so it seems like something is controlling the amount of air directed at the fire.

Any suggestions on how to adjust the feed rate, so I can get a more complete burn of the coal.

I am getting a fair amount of unburned coal falling into the ash bin.
I see in other posts that there really shouldn't be any.
rschoensta
 

PostBy: pvolcko On: Sat Oct 28, 2006 5:28 pm

BTU output is controlled entirely through control of the amount of fuel going on to the grate. There is no active control of the combustion air entering the fire. One thing that does tend to naturally help regulate combustion air during lower burns is that the ash will help reduce airflow through the non-fire holes in the grate. Basically, the more air into the fire results in a cleaner, more complete, faster burn so there is no specific need to restrict airflow during the lower fire rates.

That said, there is the potential to get some increased efficiency from controlling the combustion air entering the fire. It could be akin to the switch from carburetors to fuel injection. But it isn't as simple as controlling the speed of the combustion fan. There are safety issues to be considered, maintaining proper draft is vital (both natural and forced venting scenarios), and there is the possibility of "unnecessary complexity" being introduced. On this last point there are usability concerns, manufacturing concerns, and market demand to consider.

As for your situation of unburned coal falling into the ash bin. Is it unburned? If it were you should also be seeing red hot coals falling into the bin too. If you're seeing both of these then you need to adjust your max feed rate down in the SETUP menu (press and hold the menu button for 3 seconds or so, then press it 4 more times, instructions are in the manual). However, if you aren't getting hot coals falling into the bin then chances are the air holes toward the end of the grate are blocked or it is just your coal. Some coal will have what looks like unburned coal in the ash bin, but everything that was burnable has actually been completely burned. Doesn't mean the coal is bad or of poor quality, it's just the way it burns.

Jerry, anything else you think this could be?
pvolcko
 

PostBy: Jerry & Karen On: Sat Oct 28, 2006 5:55 pm

You covered it Paul. The settings should be Min 6, Max 40. The unburnt coal thing might be slate. I am sure if you talk to enough people you will find many different answers to the unburnt question. When your burning a fire that is 2 1/2 or 3 " long, and the peice of coal that travels through that fire take 30 minutes to go from back to front and it is in intense fire that whole time, how does it not burn. I have taken the black peices of unburnt coal and placed them back onto the fire, watched them turn red with heat and then watched them fall into the ash pan, only to be black. I have placed them on my welding table and smashed them with a hammer, and it looks like coal. Somethings just won't burn. I think we need more on this from the man himself, COALMAN, wat up.
Jerry & Karen
 

PostBy: Mikey394 On: Sat Oct 28, 2006 10:33 pm

Jerry and Paul,
here is a picture of my Hearth Stove and my current settings
FR Min 9 Max 39
FR 68
HLF 0
Room temp 79
High temp 80
Should the fire be closer to the edge (end) of the burner?
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Mikey394
 

PostBy: Jerry & Karen On: Sun Oct 29, 2006 9:05 am

Ha Mike,
I think your feed rate is fine. The numbers that you gave me FR 68 shows that it can climb another 31%. This will increase the size of your fire. If you have it set at 80*, and it was 79* with the feeder at 68% all is well. The thermostat know what feed rate to maintain to satisfy the set temp. I think I would set my Min back to 6
Jerry
Jerry & Karen
 

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