econo start up

econo start up

PostBy: mike76 On: Fri Oct 27, 2006 10:31 am

jerry, I just fired up my econo sidewinder yesterday and i have a few questions #1 what should the stack pipe temps be if stove is running full and how can i adjust temp if needed baro is set at in the middle. stack goes to 200F then when temps come up to thermostat, it drops below 100F temp outside was 30F

#2 I have it backed up to a man made stone fireplace (fake stone) fire place is wood insert do i have to install another plate of steel behind stove or do you think i'm ok. dealer thinks there won't be any problems
mike76
 

PostBy: Jerry & Karen On: Fri Oct 27, 2006 7:59 pm

Hi Mike,
#1 Your barometric damper should be set at the #3. Slide your weight all the way forward, toward the point of the V. Now bump it back just a little bit. This is a good place to have it when your hooked into a chimney. The middle is too heavy.
#2 the back of the stove must be about 12-14" away from the wall. I don't think you can get it much closer because of the pipe coming out the back. I would keep the stove 12" from the stone fireplace.
JerryLLS
Jerry & Karen
 

PostBy: mike76 On: Fri Oct 27, 2006 11:29 pm

Jerry i'm a bit confused on the web site it said you could back the stove up to a non conbustionable wall would the stone be in this catagory. i know the stove pipe runs 16 inches into the fireplace and then into the chimney
mike76
 

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PostBy: LsFarm On: Sat Oct 28, 2006 11:33 am

Mike, when the stove is running put your hand between the stove and the stone wall. If you can comfortably keep it there and the stone is not too hot to touch you should be OK.

Understand that a dealer or a factory rep must be very conservative to protect themselves from lawsuits, and similar problems. So you will get 'owners manual' responses.

I'm not a factory rep, and I carry a large liability policy, so my advice is less 'lawyer speak' and more from experience. [insert lawyer's disclaimer here] :lol:

The stone is not combustable, it will conduct heat to combustable materials behind it, but not very well. If you have any concerns at all. I'd install a piece of sheet steel with a several-inches airspace in front of the stone, then there is virtually no chance of enough heat getting by the steel and stone to combustable materials behind.

Just some ideas from personal experiences.

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

PostBy: mike76 On: Sat Oct 28, 2006 1:06 pm

greg thanks for the info. i moved the stove out 12 " from stone today plus the stone is 4 to 5 inches thick so thats a total of 16 +. I didn't relize i was putting jerry on the spot that was the last thing on my mind.
mike76
 

PostBy: LsFarm On: Sat Oct 28, 2006 1:10 pm

You may not have been putting him on the spot, I kind of read that into the posts. But it is an issue for all products, reps, etc.

I'm sure you are very safe now with 12" gap and masonry behind that.

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

PostBy: Jerry & Karen On: Sat Oct 28, 2006 6:23 pm

You guys handled that very well. Just because the wall itself is non-combustable it isn't always what it seems. When we speak of non-combustable walls, we mean block, stone, or concrete, something with no studding or furring strips behind it. I think you will find on the UL tag in the manual the you are well within the clearances. I'm a great one about safety, I have never in my 30+ years of the stove business, seen a stoker cause a fire. I'm not saying that it can't, what I am saying is that I have never seen a fire from a stoker. My concern is CO. People need to be aware of CO in their home. I burn 4 stoves, 1 at home, 2 at work, 1 at the store. But I have have 7 detectors. 3 at home 2 at work, 2 at the store. Thats why they made seat belts mandatory, people wouldn't wear them. Same with CO detectors, we put one in every stove and when we go back to service the stove a year latter, the CO detector still lays on the work bench. Now when we go and service a stove, we ask them if they have a gas alarm, if they don't and won't buy one, we won't go and service the stove, SAFETY FIRST.
Jerry & Karen
 

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