Rare American Aircraft

Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: Poconoeagle On: Wed Mar 25, 2009 11:35 pm

some cool birds..
Last edited by Richard S. on Fri Nov 29, 2013 3:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: <removed dead link>
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Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: Freddy On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 5:59 am

Cool pics, Thanks for sharing. Did you notice that one with skis had an eyeball painted on the nose? It looks like a seal's head.
Freddy
 
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Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: Devil505 On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 7:24 am

Nice post...Thanks! :up:
Devil505
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
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Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: whistlenut On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 7:35 am

Great to see the ole birds! Thanks for the post.

Yesterday was the 39 anniversary of the first supersonic flight by a commercial aircraft. The Concorde first broke the sound barrier on March 25th, 1970. I saw one once in Ashville, NC and witnessed a takeoff. Man was that thing loud! Sure was a funky looking craft, like a giant fighter plane with the famous 'droopy nose'. :eek2:
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Alaska,Gibraltor,Keystone,Vc Vigilant 2
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Coal Size/Type: Rice,Buck,Pea,Nut&Stove
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Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: Devil505 On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 7:41 am

Here's my favorite aircraft of all time:


North American F-86 Sabre /
FJ-2/3/4 Fury

(Variants/Other Names: See History below.)

F-86 Sabre
F-86 Sabre N86FS, owned and operated by Wyatt Fuller.
This aircraft, and its pilot, were lost in July 2006.
Photo by Max Haynes - MaxAir2Air.com

History: In 1944, North American Aviation submitted a design for a swept-wing day fighter which could also be used as a dive-bomber or escort fighter. Two prototype XP-86s were contracted in late 1944, but were not built until after WWII due to the incorporation of several design modifications which were prompted by German research data. The first XP-86 prototype flew on 1 October 1947, powered by a 3,750-pound thrust G.E. J35 engine. After it was re-engined with a more powerful G.E. J47 turbojet the following spring, it was re-designated the YP-86A, and exceeded the speed of sound in a shallow dive. The first production model was initially designated the P-86A, but became the F-86A in June 1948. By the time the new fighter entered US Air Force service in 1949, it had gained the name "Sabre."

Many variants were produced throughout the Sabre's life, the most numerous being the F-86D, an all-weather/night fighter, or which 2,054 were built. In addition to the Sabres built by North American, Canadair Ltd. in Montreal built 60 F-86Es for the US Air Force, plus at least 1,750 Sabre Mk 2/3/4/5/6s for the Royal Canadian Air Force and the Royal Air Force. The later Sabres were powered by various models of the native Orenda engine. Construction of the Sabre was also undertaken by Australia's Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation, which modified the aircraft design to accept two 30-mm Aden guns and a Rolls-Royce Avon 26 engine. Similarly, Fiat in Italy assembled at least 220 F-86Ks from component kits provided by North American, and Japan's Mitsubishi company assembled approximately 300 more.

An offshoot of the F-86 program began when the US Navy and Marine Corps submitted a request for an evaluation variant of the F-86E Sabre, which they designated the XFJ-2 Fury. This new airplane had an arresting hook, an extended nose gear, and a catapult hitch. Later variants of the Fury improved on these features. The FJ-2 had folding wings, the FJ-3 had a deeper fuselage and more powerful engine, and the totally-redesigned FJ-4 and FJ-4B attack aircraft bear only a passing resemblance to their predecessors. [Editor's Note: See our photo coverage of EAA AirVenture 2003 for a photo of an FJ-4 Fury.]

The F-86 saw extensive action in the Korean war, where it was often pitted against the slightly superior MiG-15. Despite the imbalance of capability in their airplanes, Sabre pilots were able to gain superiority over the MiGs. F-86s were exported to many nations around the world, and several live on as target drones, test and research aircraft and, of course, privately-owned warbirds. There is also one privately-owned FJ-4 Fury.

Nicknames: Sabredog; Dog; Dogship (F-86D); Cheesefighter (Dutch F-86Ks, named after the former Amsterdam Superintendent of Police, a Mr. Kaasjager, whose name translated to "Cheesefighter" or "Cheesehunter").

Specifications (F-86D):
Engine: One 7,500-pound thrust afterburning General Electric J47-GE-17B or -33 turbojet
Weight: Empty 12,470 lbs., Max Takeoff 17,100 lbs.
Wing Span: 37ft. 1in.
Length: 40ft. 4in.
Height: 15ft. 0in.
Performance:
Maximum Speed at Seal Level: 707 mph
Ceiling: 45,600 ft.
Range: 835 miles
Armament: 24 69.9-mm (2.75-inch) air-to-air rockets

Number Built: 9,502

Number Still Airworthy: Approximately 15 flown as warbirds; a half-dozen more are flown under government contracts worldwide.

Special Feature:
Last edited by Richard S. on Fri Nov 29, 2013 3:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Deleted File
Devil505
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000

Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: 009to090 On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 8:15 am

Great list of "Firsts" and "Lasts". Thanks for the memories! The MixMaster was always my favorite. What a concept! ZERO prop torque! Too bad the counterrotating shafts kept burning up :shock:
009to090
 
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Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: Steve.N On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 8:45 am

When I was a boy growing up in south Florida they used to spray mosquitoes with converted B-17's and flew over the roof tops at about 200 ft. Was pretty cool to watch. Later when I was older there was an abandoned B-25 in the weeds of the local airport that we played in, fought a lot of Germans in that one. Around 1970 I drove by the airport and there was a crew working on the B-25 two weeks later it was gone. I stopped and inquired where it had been trucked to probably a museum or scrap yard. The guy at the airport told me it had been flown away, always amazed me.
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Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: whistlenut On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 8:47 am

I'm sure you heard that Lockheed lost a Raptor and test pilot yesterday near Edwards Air Force Base. No matter what, flight is a dangerous business.
whistlenut
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA130's,260's, AHS130&260's,EFM900,GJ&VanWert
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Franks Boiler,Itasca415,NYer130,Van Wert
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Yellow Flame
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska-4,Keystoker-2,
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Alaska,Gibraltor,Keystone,Vc Vigilant 2
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Van Wert, NYer's, Ford,Jensen.
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Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: Dann757 On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:10 am

So amazing. I flew in a 1937 Ford Tri-motor at an airshow once, very smooth ride.
I once knew an ex Air Force flight instructor who liked to take people for rides in a Great Lakes aerobatic biplane. That plane was at a small airport near Lambertville called Van Zant Airport. He would put me in the front seat and go up and practice aerobatics. No amusement park ride could match flying upside down in an open cockpit biplane, doing snap rolls, spirals, loops. I'll never forget the g's, I came out of that plane airsick every time but totally worth it and I never quite lost my lunch. I also flew with him in a Bellanca Decathalon down the Garden State Parkway to a private airport once. This guy was a cowboy and liked to drop altitude quickly, he came in over some power lines and landed a little too fast, and struggled to slow the plane down on the grass runway; we were headed for the side of a big red barn! He went down there to look at a Pitts he wanted to buy. Another time he flew over his girlfriend's house, and almost ran us out of gas; he said he was looking for a field to land in. We made it back to the airport on fumes.

Many years ago, mid seventies, I worked at a place called Aircraft Radio in Boonton Twp, NJ. It was an avionics factory with a private airstrip. They took everybody out of the factory to watch a re-enactment of the first blind instrument flight ever! They had an open cockpit biplane with the front cockpit covered in a taught ,tan canvas dome. The plane had a safety pilot in the back cockpit. It took off and landed again on instruments only. And amazingly, Jimmy Doolittle himself was there, gave a short speech inside the factory for all the employees! He was a little old man; but a great American Hero!!!
Dann757
 

Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: Poconoeagle On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:13 am

Freddy wrote:Cool pics, Thanks for sharing. Did you notice that one with skis had an eyeball painted on the nose? It looks like a seal's head.


The P-38, it does look like an eye!
has some hefty firepower there also. Sad about the F-22 pilot and bird. sometimes i wonder about fly by wire ...
Poconoeagle
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Buckwalter & Co. , EFM520
Stove/Furnace Model: No. 28 Glenwood 1880, Alaska

Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: Devil505 On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:22 am

Poconoeagle wrote:
Freddy wrote:Cool pics, Thanks for sharing. Did you notice that one with skis had an eyeball painted on the nose? It looks like a seal's head.


The P-38, it does look like an eye!
has some hefty firepower there also. Sad about the F-22 pilot and bird. sometimes i wonder about fly by wire ...


The P-38, U2, SR-71 all came out of Lockheed's "Skunk Works" & were designed by a legend...Kelly Johnson!!
(now there's a guy who really thought outside the box for his time!)
Devil505
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000

Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: Poconoeagle On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:39 am

Dann757 wrote:So amazing. I flew in a 1937 Ford Tri-motor at an airshow once, very smooth ride.
I once knew an ex Air Force flight instructor who liked to take people for rides in a Great Lakes aerobatic biplane. That plane was at a small airport near Lambertville called Van Zant Airport. He would put me in the front seat and go up and practice aerobatics. No amusement park ride could match flying upside down in an open cockpit biplane, doing snap rolls, spirals, loops. I'll never forget the g's, I came out of that plane airsick every time but totally worth it and I never quite lost my lunch. I also flew with him in a Bellanca Decathalon down the Garden State Parkway to a private airport once. This guy was a cowboy and liked to drop altitude quickly, he came in over some power lines and landed a little too fast, and struggled to slow the plane down on the grass runway; we were headed for the side of a big red barn! He went down there to look at a Pitts he wanted to buy. Another time he flew over his girlfriend's house, and almost ran us out of gas; he said he was looking for a field to land in. We made it back to the airport on fumes.

Many years ago, mid seventies, I worked at a place called Aircraft Radio in Boonton Twp, NJ. It was an avionics factory with a private airstrip. They took everybody out of the factory to watch a re-enactment of the first blind instrument flight ever! They had an open cockpit biplane with the front cockpit covered in a taught ,tan canvas dome. The plane had a safety pilot in the back cockpit. It took off and landed again on instruments only. And amazingly, Jimmy Doolittle himself was there, gave a short speech inside the factory for all the employees! He was a little old man; but a great American Hero!!!


Sounds like you had a blast! and great oppertunities!! I studied with and flew and old german glider with one of the top WWII glider pilots years back and that little 14" single wheel in the belly made that ground come up quick! Knowing there is no "Throttle-Up" and abort makes it more interesting!

I am almost finished with a 1/4 scale RC Pitts build. G-4500 Supre Tigre and a 22" prop ought to make it snap pretty quick! :D
Poconoeagle
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Buckwalter & Co. , EFM520
Stove/Furnace Model: No. 28 Glenwood 1880, Alaska

Re: Rare American Aircraft

PostBy: 009to090 On: Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:39 am

Heres a pic of my younger self, loading a small twin Turoprop Beechcraft (I believe) onto my C-5A. The beechcraft was such a light load for the C-5, we had to install a 10,000lb counterwieght in the forward cargo bay to get the CG correct.
We also tested a C-5 taking off from a newly-plowed corn field. C-5's are an all-terrain plane. One foot plow ruts didn't slow it down in the least.
Ahhhh, those were the days..... :D :D

C5_Beechcraft.JPG
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009to090
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520 HighBoy
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: DVC-500 x 2
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Rice