Thinking of buying a Warm Morning

Thinking of buying a Warm Morning

PostBy: zeetz On: Sun Apr 12, 2009 11:10 am

Hi!

I am thinking of buying a Warm Morning stove - model 520...I see it burns both wood and coal, but I would only be burning wood in it since I have no access to coal... I have a couple questions if anyone can help answer I would appreciate it very much:

1. I would be using it in the living room so that the heat will travel down the hall to the back of the house. I am concerned that when I need to out more wood in, that when I open the stove door soot or smoke may fill the room...anyone know if that happens?

2. I hear the design doesn't require door gaskets - that it is made that way for proper draft ? Wood also?

3. Anyone who has one here, do you have any tips to give me on set -up and operation of this kind of wood stove?

Thanks!!
zeetz
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warm Morning (want to buy)
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: Thinking of buying a Warm Morning

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sun Apr 12, 2009 11:17 am

We have to help get you access to coal. :idea:
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Thinking of buying a Warm Morning

PostBy: rockwood On: Sun Apr 12, 2009 12:15 pm

First off, you should carefully inspect the cast iron, firebricks and grates for cracks or damage. Check the grates to be sure they slide/move easily. Replacement grates are available for this stove but I am not aware of anyplace that makes firebricks for these stoves anymore.
From the description of your home, I think it should heat it ok. The living room will be significantly warmer than the back rooms.

As far as smoke coming out when you open the door/lid, if the chimney is designed properly smoke should be minimal. Generally, chimneys that run up through the inside of the house and are taller than the entire house work the best. Chimneys that run up the outside wall of the house can be a problem. You will want to use a manual pipe damper for this type of stove since you plan to burn wood in it.
These stoves were not designed to be "air tight" (no gaskets etc.) but they are still very good stoves in my opinion.

Be sure to get at least 2 smoke/carbon monoxide detectors if you don't already have them just to be safe.
Wood,nCoal is right, these stoves are excellent coal burners. If you post the general area where you live I'm sure we could help you find coal. :)
rockwood
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Stokermatic coal furnace
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Rockwood Stoveworks Circulator
Baseburners & Antiques: Malleable/Monarch Range
Coal Size/Type: Soft coal: Lump and stoker (slack coal)


Re: Thinking of buying a Warm Morning

PostBy: coalnewbie On: Sun Apr 12, 2009 12:30 pm

I have a Warm morning - used it for years and then had it rebuilt as new. Too lazy to reinstall it as I bought a DVC500 and at 65 I am always looking for an easier way of doing things. They do throw out a lot of heat but not as much as the DVC that does my whole victorian leakbox house. I do love the look of the older stoves. $500. 845.469.2896
coalnewbie
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL AnthraKing 180K, Pocono110K,KStokr 90K, DVC
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93,
Baseburners & Antiques: Invader 2 Wings Best, Glenwood #8 + Herald 116x
Coal Size/Type: Rice, Chestnut
Other Heating: Heating Oil CH, Toyotomi OM 22

Re: Thinking of buying a Warm Morning

PostBy: franco b On: Sun Apr 12, 2009 7:50 pm

I am not familiar with that model. If it is like the model 780 in the picture, then you will see a flap at the top of the door opening to prevent smoke from entering the room. This does not look like a good coal burner.

Warm Morning stoves that do not have gaskets on the doors have machined surfaces that fit very close and do not need gaskets, at least on those I am familiar with.

Richard
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franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Thinking of buying a Warm Morning

PostBy: rockwood On: Sun Apr 12, 2009 9:28 pm

rockwood wrote: I am not aware of anyplace that makes firebricks for these stoves anymore.

Found this thread about replacement firebricks.
The care and feeding of a Warm Morning stove
rockwood
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Stokermatic coal furnace
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Rockwood Stoveworks Circulator
Baseburners & Antiques: Malleable/Monarch Range
Coal Size/Type: Soft coal: Lump and stoker (slack coal)

Re: Thinking of buying a Warm Morning

PostBy: envisage On: Mon Apr 13, 2009 8:17 am

zeetz wrote:Hi!

I am thinking of buying a Warm Morning stove - model 520...I see it burns both wood and coal, but I would only be burning wood in it since I have no access to coal... I have a couple questions if anyone can help answer I would appreciate it very much:

1. I would be using it in the living room so that the heat will travel down the hall to the back of the house. I am concerned that when I need to out more wood in, that when I open the stove door soot or smoke may fill the room...anyone know if that happens?

2. I hear the design doesn't require door gaskets - that it is made that way for proper draft ? Wood also?

3. Anyone who has one here, do you have any tips to give me on set -up and operation of this kind of wood stove?

Thanks!!


Welcome Zeetz! I have the Warm Morning Model 400. You can see it in my profile picture to the right. I use mine to heat with coal, so I only use wood to get it started. It does burn wood very well, and there is only smoke when I first get the stove going. Once it and the chimney heat up, the drafting takes over and pulls any smoke up and out. You are right about the door gaskets. The design does not require them. The Warm Mornings are really coal stoves, except for the model 782 which I did not know about until reading this thread. Start your stove will some balled up newspaper, covering the bottom. Light that, and then throw in some light kindling wood. Once that is going, add some smaller pieces, but not too much or you might snuff out the fire. You will be surprised how quickly the fire takes, and how hot it gets. Keep adding progressively larger pieces (preferably hardwood) until your fire is going well. At that point you will want to close the ash door at the bottom, and adjust the air coming in from above or your fire will burn out of control. I know you want to burn wood, and maybe that is all you have access to, but if you can get your hands on coal, please give it try. It burn wood upstairs, and coal down in the basement. I love both, but admittedly the coal is much less work.
envisage
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Werner Foundry 350a
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Warm Morning 400, Fire Boss Wood/Coal Hyrbrid
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat, Pea, Chestnut and Stove