desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: Don A On: Thu Apr 16, 2009 1:07 pm

Hello gentlemen.

I was searching around for a local, or semi-local, source for bituminus blacksmithing coal, and I cam across a link to your forum.
I am now convinced that there is an internet forum for everything ;)

I am in East Tennesee and work at blacksmithing as a hobby (not my day job).
I'm nearly out of coal and would be interested in finding a source near here where I could by a half-a-ton or so.
The stuff I usually get is great coal, but I can't help but to think I could get it cheaper in bulk than "by the bag".

It seems that most smiths prefer coal from the Pocahatas seam, but I'm not sure how important that is.
The coal I normally use is described like this:
"Metalurgical grade bituminus blacksmith coal -15,500 BTUs - cokes dry - low clinker - low ash - low sulfur."

Any good leads on where I might find a load? I'm near Knoxville, by the way.

Thanks in advance,

Don
Don A
 

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: coal berner On: Thu Apr 16, 2009 1:16 pm

Don A wrote:Hello gentlemen.

I was searching around for a local, or semi-local, source for bituminus blacksmithing coal, and I cam across a link to your forum.
I am now convinced that there is an internet forum for everything ;)

I am in East Tennesee and work at blacksmithing as a hobby (not my day job).
I'm nearly out of coal and would be interested in finding a source near here where I could by a half-a-ton or so.
The stuff I usually get is great coal, but I can't help but to think I could get it cheaper in bulk than "by the bag".

It seems that most smiths prefer coal from the Pocahatas seam, but I'm not sure how important that is.
The coal I normally use is described like this:
"Metalurgical grade bituminus blacksmith coal -15,500 BTUs - cokes dry - low clinker - low ash - low sulfur."

Any good leads on where I might find a load? I'm near Knoxville, by the way.

Thanks in advance,

Don

I Don't know if this will help you they ship everywhere or try the second one below

http://www.penncoal.com/wst_page4.html


http://www.appaltree.net/aba/coal.htm
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.
coal berner
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1986 Electric Furnace Man 520 DF
Stove/Furnace Make: Electric Furnace Man
Stove/Furnace Model: DF520

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: RMA On: Thu Apr 16, 2009 2:49 pm

I can't imagine how the two very different types of coal can be dubbed "Blacksmith's" coal unless it is because they are low in an element deemed undesirable, such as Sulfur. I think any Anthracite is going to fit the bill...

Bob
RMA
 


Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: Richard S. On: Thu Apr 16, 2009 2:57 pm

RMA wrote:I can't imagine how the two very different types of coal can be dubbed "Blacksmith's" coal


Apparently the soft coal is much easier to fire, I had customer who did it as a hobby. He said the hard coal just didn't work right. Too hard to keep going or couldn't get it hot enough because of the way the furnace is set up. Not sure exactly what the issue was but he asked me about getting soft coal in bulk which of course I didn't have available.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Thu Apr 16, 2009 3:00 pm

The type of coal that will work best is usually determined by the forge in use.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: BigBarney On: Thu Apr 16, 2009 8:01 pm

Here are some sources:

http://www.anvilfire.com/gazette/index.htm


http://www.appaltree.net/aba/coal.htm
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.


http://www.appaltree.net/aba/index.htm


These should get you started.



BigBarney
BigBarney
 

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: coal berner On: Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:51 pm

Most blacksmiths forges are open over the fire air Anthracite does not like over the top air Bit does Plus alot of that bit coal burns hotter then Anthracite 15.500 to 15.800 Hot stuff
coal berner
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1986 Electric Furnace Man 520 DF
Stove/Furnace Make: Electric Furnace Man
Stove/Furnace Model: DF520

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: Don A On: Fri Apr 17, 2009 1:02 pm

Thank you for the input.

I've figured out that if I could borrow a good sized truck and make a run for WV, I would be in business.

I have forged with anthracite, but it won't "coke up" like bituminous.
When we need particularly high heat, as in forge welding, we often let the green coal "coke up" to form what looks like an igloo.
The top coal/coke acts as its own insulator and gives you an oven effect.
When you push it hard, the core will burn white... hot enough to burn your steel if you're not careful.

And yes, sulfur, ash, and clinker are the blacksmith's enemies. The less, the better.

Thanks again for the help.

Don
Don A
 

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: steamup On: Wed Apr 22, 2009 11:31 am

Penn coal is probably the best bet for coal.

Another supplier that ships small quanities is:

http://www.reboysupply.com/coal.htm

It is not cheap due to shipping.
steamup
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman-Anderson AA-130, Keystoker K-6
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: HS Tarm 502 Wood/Coal/Oil
Coal Size/Type: pea, buck, rice

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: steamup On: Wed Apr 22, 2009 11:40 am

Another option is to check with a live steam club or hobbiest near you. See what they burn. Perhaps you can go together a split a shipment to save money.

Try this link for info:

http://www.discoverlivesteam.com/A-clubs.htm
steamup
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman-Anderson AA-130, Keystoker K-6
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: HS Tarm 502 Wood/Coal/Oil
Coal Size/Type: pea, buck, rice

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: Duengeon master On: Fri Apr 24, 2009 2:37 pm

Don A wrote:Thank you for the input.

I've figured out that if I could borrow a good sized truck and make a run for WV, I would be in business.

I have forged with anthracite, but it won't "coke up" like bituminous.
When we need particularly high heat, as in forge welding, we often let the green coal "coke up" to form what looks like an igloo.
The top coal/coke acts as its own insulator and gives you an oven effect.
When you push it hard, the core will burn white... hot enough to burn your steel if you're not careful.

And yes, sulfur, ash, and clinker are the blacksmith's enemies. The less, the better.

Thanks again for the help.

Don
Hi Don, You can find some good Quality bit. coal near the Bristol area. You can also go north into Va. around the Lebanon area there is mining all over that area.
Duengeon master
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harmon Mark III
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite pea and nut mix. Bituminous lump

Re: desperate blacksmith on board... pardon the interruption

PostBy: Don A On: Wed Apr 29, 2009 12:34 pm

Thanks again.

I appreciate it.
Don A