The Problem with Hand Fired Units

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: Mahanoy Boy On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 11:12 am

Hi Koko,

After 8 seasons I'm very happy with the performance of HF70 insert. No insert will give you the heat of a freestanding stove since 3 sides are surrounded by brick but it does pretty well (heats an 1,800 sq ft house by itself if you crank it up). Since I made that last post in 2006 I had my house insulated and went from burning 7,000 pounds of coal per year to about 2,400 so I don't have to empty the ash as often as I used to but the shaker does very well as long as you don't over shake or shake a low fire. I've left it burn for over 50 hours before without refilling it. My only complaint is the fan noise. Being an insert you have to keep it running pretty much all the time to get much heat out of it and it's not bad on low but when you crank it up it gets pretty loud. Other than that I love it and more importantly my wife loves it. She can't live without the heat and it's the only thing she likes about winter.

I'm not necessarily saying it's the best one out there cause a lot of people like their Hitzers but it has served me very well and I would recommend it.

Mahanoy Boy
Mahanoy Boy
 

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 11:37 am

WOW :jawdrop:

I've been a member of a lot of different forums, but never have I seen someone post within minutes after no posts in over 7 years.

Welcome back Mahony Boy, and thank you for responding to Koko.
SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous. Labeled as 'Big Vein', about the size of acorns. Makes a lot of ash, but heats well and lasts longer than my previous coal.

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: Koko On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 11:50 am

Mahanoy Boy,
Thanks very much for that input. I have been receiving several comments on the Keystoker inserts and all have been positive so far. My fireplace opening is very small (25 1/2" wide, old house & they actually used a coal basket grate to burn bit coal - not very efficient), so this would be my best option for burning coal more efficiently. Spoke with Keystoker, the insert will fit into my opening so now I looking at pricing so I can get this insert installed for the next winter season. Thanks again for your help, much appreciated. Kevin.
Koko
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Morso
Other Heating: Oil

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Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: whistlenut On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 12:05 pm

Be very careful Dan, you never know how closely you are being followed. When Goggle Earth snaps a shot of your property and identifies YOU as the one taking a leak on the back 40, you will know Big Brother is waaaaaaayyyyyyyy to close for comfort. Can you hear that drone I dispatched to your house yet? Put that away.......

Keystoker handfeds perform very well and are extremely durable.

When the power is out, no one bitches about hand feds........of where there is NO power, no generators.......wait, not many moving parts. If you die before a shakedown and refill was due.......well you get 'cold' faster than the stoker guy who waits until the ashes plug it up or the supply exhausts itself.

Just two days ago, I fired up a Tarm 202 to heat a building 40 by 60 with 27' ceilings and a 7" thick radiant slab (2 PM first fire) . Slab temp was 27 degrees at all corners and at 8 pm it was 40 degrees. You can do the math....7" thick slab, antifreeze in the piping(obviously). Next morning 52 in the building, slab and air temp inside. Outside was 12 degrees. Last night it was 59 degrees at 8:30 or 20:30 for us military folks. This AM at 08:00 it is 70 in the building, top to bottom. Feed water at 115 degrees, return at 72. Total coal used (stove, nut and pea mix) 320 lbs to achieve this temp. A little high, and dialing back to a 65 stable temp.
Taco 1"mixing valve was by-passed until temp of building stabilized. full blending of feed and return resulted in a 10 degree differential overnight. I questioned if the Tarm had enough output, but like they say: slow and steady wind the race every single time. 78,000 gross overcoming that demand was fine. Where did I 'assist the process'? Draft inducer was mounted inside the building.....thereby adding a draft enhancement. Stack temps leaving the boiler at 450, and after the inducer 185, and 130 at exit.
Last edited by whistlenut on Sun Mar 16, 2014 10:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
whistlenut
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA130's,260's, AHS130&260's,EFM900,GJ&VanWert
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Franks Boiler,Itasca415,NYer130,Van Wert
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Yellow Flame
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska-4,Keystoker-2,
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Alaska,Gibraltor,Keystone,Vc Vigilant 2
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Van Wert, NYer's, Ford,Jensen.
Coal Size/Type: Rice,Buck,Pea,Nut&Stove
Other Heating: Oil HWBB

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 3:52 pm

Funny, I never have any problems with any stove I've ever owned. None of the issues described here ever occur. I'm gone from home sometimes 18 hours a day and my stoves are always orange, glowing and warm when I walk through the door.
I can promise you that I will NEVER have a stoker stove or anything that is dependent on electric power to operate.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: freetown fred On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 5:04 pm

DOUBLE DITTO on all that Wm. :)
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: Bruce M On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 6:12 pm

I had those problems of ash build up around the sides of the firebox and just about every week I had to take a little shovel and try to shovel out the sides. This procedure was very difficult and made a mess. Only until about two months ago did I figure it out and everyone was always telling me how to do it but I wasn't listening. The key for me and my stove is the poker, I have to poke from the top all around the sides downwards into the grates then I shake as normal. This simply clears out the ash wall around the sides and I get much better combustion as well. I haven't had to shovel anything out in two months. If you are having this same issue give it a try, you may be pleasantly surprised at the results.
Bruce M
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1627 basement stove

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: dcrane On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:38 pm

Fastest reply/follow up of a thread after a 7 year hiatus in forum history! :clap: that record wont be beat for many years im sure! GG Mahanoy Boy :punk:

In regards to the Harmon ash build up / complete shake issue their was a thread this morning that had some good insights... Harman Grates: How to keep them clean and clear
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: Mahanoy Boy On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 11:07 pm

Sorry about the 7 year hiatus. I would have posted sooner but you guys always seem to have answers to all my questions before I even ask them.

Thanks everyone!
Mahanoy Boy
 

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Mon Mar 17, 2014 2:46 am

wsherrick wrote:Funny, I never have any problems with any stove I've ever owned. None of the issues described here ever occur. I'm gone from home sometimes 18 hours a day and my stoves are always orange, glowing and warm when I walk through the door.
I can promise you that I will NEVER have a stoker stove or anything that is dependent on electric power to operate.


I'm right there with you Will. At the moment I'm sitting in the dark with the room lit by the orange glow of the stove pumping out heat. Outside the snow is still falling along with the wind chill but with very little effort and cost I can maintain the house to 75*. What a concept!

I've said it before but Thanks to the Forum for teaching me how to burn coal! Lisa

Oh yeah, go Virginia and go BYU!!
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Sat Mar 22, 2014 8:00 am

Mahanoy Boy wrote:Sorry about the 7 year hiatus. I would have posted sooner but you guys always seem to have answers to all my questions before I even ask them.

Thanks everyone!

No need to be a stranger. There are lots of topics on this forum, from politics to food, health, cars, computers, gardens.........just about everything.

Maybe you have the answers to our questions, but just haven't posted them yet :up:
SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous. Labeled as 'Big Vein', about the size of acorns. Makes a lot of ash, but heats well and lasts longer than my previous coal.

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: dlj On: Sat Mar 22, 2014 4:21 pm

I've not had problems burning with hand fired units. I wouldn't say no to a stoker, but I do want a hand fired available if the electric goes out. None of the problems described would be confirmed on my end...

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: Lightning On: Mon Mar 24, 2014 4:48 pm

I suppose everyone goes thru some growing pains when learning coal.. I know I've had my share!! :lol: It just takes some "watch and learn" discipline. I plan to use the hand fed for a while. I still enjoy taking care of my fire.. :) Maybe someday a boiler stoker, when I can also put a nice antique coal burner in the corner of the living room 8-)
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Mon Mar 24, 2014 4:59 pm

[quote="Lightning"]I suppose everyone goes thru some growing pains when learning coal.. I know I've had my share!! :lol: It just takes some "watch and learn" discipline. I plan to use the hand fed for a while. I still enjoy taking care of my fire.. Maybe someday a boiler stoker, when I can also put a nice antique coal burner in the corner of the living room 8-)[/quote]


"It's so easy, even a caveman can do it" :lol: I hear yah bro many pains ago. As long as I'm walkin' and breathin', we have a stoker :P Must be the primate in us that enjoys fire. HHHmmmmmmmmmm FIRE GOOD! :taz:
michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Coal Size/Type: Pea, and a little nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace

Re: The Problem with Hand Fired Units

PostBy: SMITTY On: Mon Mar 24, 2014 5:14 pm

For me, the hand-fired became a chore - especially towards the end of the season ... like right NOW. I would DREAD going down there, dead tired, only to have a rock jam the grates open and dump the entire fire in the pan! NOT good for the blood pressure ... or any objects within throwing distance of my rage ... :lol:

I switched up the load times to mornings ... but then the house would be the coldest when you needed the heat the most. There was no good solution. This house takes ALOT of fuel, and alot of effort to heat! The hand fired route was too much for me after 8 years.

This winter has been much easier on the soul, that's for sure. I forget about the ashes for days ... and just poke all the granola bars down with my poker and it's all good. :)
SMITTY
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Patriot Coal - custom built by Jim Dorsey
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III (not currently in use)
Coal Size/Type: Rice / Blaschak anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired Burnham boiler

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