Barometric damper?

Barometric damper?

PostBy: chopper698 On: Sat Aug 08, 2009 8:59 am

I have had my Harmon Mark II for three years now, and I its been just great. This season I want to try
a barometric damper on it. As of now I have a manual damper on it just above my T that usually stays
3/4 of the way shut with the air knob turn and a half out.
I know with my manual damper ,when I shake my stove down, I shut my damper all the way and when I
am done I open it back up all the way when I load. I have found this way I dont get fly ash all over my glass.
But what how am I benefitting by installing a barometric damper? Or should I just leave well enough alone.
chopper698
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer 30-95

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: DOUG On: Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:38 am

The purpose of the barometric draft regulator is to automatically compensate for the varying differences in pressure between the inside and outside of the house, to the designated adjustable inches of water, set by the user for the appliance. In other words, it prevents fanning of the flames and provides a even constant burning of the fuel.

I would leave your existing manual damper. This will allow you to control the heat more than anything from escaping up the chimney. Check out this video, It will explain how the barometric and the manual draft damper work together for a really efficient system. http://vimeo.com/3060371 When I saw this video, everything became clear and I wanted one of those Chubbys. :idea: :) DOUG
DOUG
 
Stove/Furnace Make: CHUBBY, D.S.MACHINE BOILER
Stove/Furnace Model: CLAYTON 1600

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:05 pm

Hi guys,

This winter will be my 4th year burning a Mark II so when you said you have a manual damper on yours my ears perked up. I double checked my manual and it says "MANUAL DAMPERS OR “HEAT SAVERS” MUST NEVER BE INSTALLED IN THE FLUE PIPE. IMPROPER OPERATION COULD RESULT IN DEATH." (The emphasis is theirs.) You may want to double check the actual location of your manual damper and move it if necessary. Besides waking up dead one morning, you could have complications with the insurance company and/or the county code people if you ever had a claim for whatever reason and they reviewed your stove’s installation; just a thought.

I didn’t use a baro damper for my first 3 and half years. I didn’t know any better the first 3 years and I took my own sweet time getting around to it for the other six months; big mistake. Once the baro damper was in and properly set I saw a huge improvement in the way my stove burned.

I don’t know the how and why it works. I don’t care; I feel the same way about math. It just works. I am able to maintain the same level of heat while reducing the actual amount of coal I use. At the end of the winter I had 15 bags of coal left over and that was after a couple of weeks of sub normal temperatures. Before the baro I always had to make an additional run for coal the last month or so. Obviously, the baro was allowing me to keep more of the heat in the house and not up the chimney. I refer to the baro as the “lung” because it allows the stove to breathe; pulling draft from other then the fire box. The baro damper also helps me control the burn better. For lack of a better word, it’s smoother. Using the baro means I don’t have to watch the stove as closely. The fire is going to burn uniformly and I will retain more of the heat regardless of the weather conditions outside. My longest burn without attention has been 37 hours and the fire had a couple of hours left in it when I got back. A side benefit is that I don’t have to open the stove as often to shake or add coal and that helps control the flyash that gets in my house. I can’t imagine ever not having a baro.

Those are my thoughts, have a great rest of the summer. Lisa
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I
Coal Size/Type: nut/pea

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Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: DOUG On: Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:38 pm

Yes, that could be true if you install the barometric draft regulator and the manual damper in the wrong order. You always want the barometric draft regulator to be after everything or the last thing going to the chimney connector. The manual damper will then only function as a draft control through the fire, similar to the primary air control on the stove. With the barometric draft regulator, you really shouldn't have the need for a manual damper if it is set right. But, some people like the added control of the draft through the fire.
DOUG
 
Stove/Furnace Make: CHUBBY, D.S.MACHINE BOILER
Stove/Furnace Model: CLAYTON 1600

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sun Aug 09, 2009 8:13 am

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With an air tight stove such as the Harman there is no need for a manual damper. The manual damper is used on a different type of stove (such as a kitchen cook stove) which is not air tight to help control the burn. The baro damper regulates the draft to the stove to keep it within the correct range and prevents overfiring.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: coalkirk On: Sun Aug 09, 2009 2:01 pm

Agree totally with Wood'nCoal. No manual damper. A barometric damper is draft limiting device. Without it you have too much heat going up the chimney. Your burn changes over the course of time and your manual damper does not adjust with it. A baro does. It makes a significant difference.
coalkirk
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF3000
Coal Size/Type: antrhcite/rice coal

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: hyway61 On: Sun Aug 23, 2009 1:33 pm

In heating and plumbing supply they sell a simple baro damper often installed in a tee and found on oil burners. These consist of a round weight on a screw with a locking nut ; and they cost about $10 or $15 plus the tee. Are these OK for airtight coal stove applications..?

hyway61
hyway61
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Russo
Stove/Furnace Model: C-55

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: JB Sparks On: Sun Aug 23, 2009 3:50 pm

Hiway61, If the baro you are refering to is a Field controls unit Model RC, that is the one most of the pros on this site recommend. It is what I have on my Harman boiler and on My new Chubby. Hope this helps. - Jeff
JB Sparks
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman - Chubby
Stove/Furnace Model: Harman: SF160 - Chubby Sr.

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Sun Aug 23, 2009 4:24 pm

JB Sparks wrote:Hiway61, If the baro you are refering to is a Field controls unit Model RC, that is the one most of the pros on this site recommend. It is what I have on my Harman boiler and on My new Chubby. Hope this helps. - Jeff

I use and recommend the RC but to be honest, I think I may go with a Model M on the Axeman this fall. It is what Field Controls recommend and they have their reasons. It is a double acting baro, kind of a scary thought, eh?
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: JB Sparks On: Sun Aug 23, 2009 4:30 pm

Coaledsweat, what is the double action?... does it suck and blow at the same time? :lol:
JB Sparks
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman - Chubby
Stove/Furnace Model: Harman: SF160 - Chubby Sr.

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: CapeCoaler On: Sun Aug 23, 2009 4:39 pm

It swings both ways! ;)
CapeCoaler
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: JB Sparks On: Sun Aug 23, 2009 5:08 pm

CapeCoaler wrote:It swings both ways!
Hmmm ...we are still talking about Barometric dampers...Right :lol:
JB Sparks
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman - Chubby
Stove/Furnace Model: Harman: SF160 - Chubby Sr.

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: coalkirk On: Sun Aug 23, 2009 11:29 pm

I have model M baro and the only thing I noticed is that it's adjustment is much more sensitive and precise.
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coalkirk
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF3000
Coal Size/Type: antrhcite/rice coal

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: JB Sparks On: Mon Aug 24, 2009 6:18 am

Thanks Coalkirk, now that I see the pic, I have seen those before. Do you think the extra precision is helpful on a slow responsive coal fire?
JB Sparks
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman - Chubby
Stove/Furnace Model: Harman: SF160 - Chubby Sr.

Re: Barometric damper?

PostBy: CapeCoaler On: Mon Aug 24, 2009 7:59 am

Yes Barometric damper, the metal swinging 'thingy' with the big knob. :woot:
Gas needs the double acting so it don't get blown out. ;)

The MG-1 provides precise, accurate control of drafts at levels higher than permitted by a standard draft diverter, which is a frequent requirement with gas. Because it is double-acting, it opens out to relieve positive vent system pressures as low as .01".


In a duel fuel oil/gas or a gas-fired only application, use the M+MG2 as a double-acting draft control with the optional Field Thermal Switch accessory. Use the M+MG2 as a single-acting draft control for oil or solid fuel applications


The M employs side wings to control air direction with gate curvatures designed to compensate for differences in horizontal and vertical settings.


http://www.fieldcontrols.com/draftcontrol.php#m_mg2

M is for oil and coal.
MG-1 for gas, double acting
M+MG2 everybody with a flue over 10" specify single or double acting

The M+MG2 is a switch hitter but needs to be specified for which team! 8-)
CapeCoaler
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Visit Hitzer Stoves