wood in a hotblast

wood in a hotblast

PostBy: gitrdonecoal On: Wed Oct 28, 2009 3:49 pm

Here is my 1557 on wood. I usually burn coal when its colder, but wood is perfect to kill the chill this time of year. [attachment=3]IMG00006-20091028-1444.jpg[/attachment]. This is a piece of sheet metal that I cut just slightly larger than the baro hole. When burning wood I use a manual.[attachment=2]IMG00009-20091028-1508.jpg[/attachment]
Loaded up with newspaper, kindling, and FREE slabwood. Ready to light[attachment=1]IMG00011-20091028-1511.jpg[/attachment][attachment=0]IMG00013-20091028-1514.jpg[/attachment]
Love the heat this thing throws out. When coal season comes around I will surely have a coal thread in the hand fired section. Thanks NEPA and stay warm.
John
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gitrdonecoal
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90
Stove/Furnace Make: USSC
Stove/Furnace Model: Hotblast 1557

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: BIG BEAM On: Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:28 pm

I have a 1557m now for 3 years and just tonight I tried wood,some nice hard maple and a little epae I think that's how you spell it.It's that south american wood that's real expensive.A carpenter I work with had a bunch of cut offs.DON'T DO THIS IT HIT ABOUT 700F AND TOOK OFF LIKE HELL.IT BURRIED THE THERMOMETER ON THE FACE OF THE FURNACE AT 900F WHILE I WAS SQUIRTING WATER ON IT.I think the resins in this stuff lights off at 700ish and is like putting kero on a fire.A little is OK but I added about 4 board feet and it took off.I put in about 6-2x6 a foot long with the maple.Except for the inferno I did have a lot of fun seeing what air over fire and air under did to the flame .
DON
BIG BEAM
 
Stove/Furnace Make: USS Hot blast
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557M

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: mikeandgerry On: Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:44 pm

BIG BEAM wrote:I have a 1557m now for 3 years and just tonight I tried wood,some nice hard maple and a little epae I think that's how you spell it.It's that south american wood that's real expensive.A carpenter I work with had a bunch of cut offs.DON'T DO THIS IT HIT ABOUT 700F AND TOOK OFF LIKE HELL.IT BURRIED THE THERMOMETER ON THE FACE OF THE FURNACE AT 900F WHILE I WAS SQUIRTING WATER ON IT.I think the resins in this stuff lights off at 700ish and is like putting kero on a fire.A little is OK but I added about 4 board feet and it took off.I put in about 6-2x6 a foot long with the maple.Except for the inferno I did have a lot of fun seeing what air over fire and air under did to the flame .
DON



Holy Crap, Don. You are going to tick off everybody...the environmentalists for burning up the Brazilian rain forest, the firemen for starting a chimney fire and the "coal mouse" fire starter people for revealing a new and improved way to get a coal fire started !

You had better save that Brazilian "gasoline wood" for a rainy day.
mikeandgerry
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman-Anderson Anthratube 130-M


Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: BIG BEAM On: Fri Nov 13, 2009 11:47 pm

Hey Mike I didn't think of the coal mouse thing.My neighbor has a stoker,maybe I should try some to start him up for the season.
DON
BIG BEAM
 
Stove/Furnace Make: USS Hot blast
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557M

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: gusarch On: Thu Nov 26, 2009 10:27 pm

This is a long one, so bear with me! Thoughts and advice from the hotblast owners using the forced draft kits. How do you guys use them and how does it work out for you? I bought my stove three years ago, this will be the third winter for it but have yet to need it this year so far! The first year I used it without the draft kit, and basiclly kept the slide damper on the door just cracked all winter long, except when starting a fire. I had never burned wood before. I would start a fire and let
it get up into the burn zone on my stack guage, then set the door damper back as mentioned. I learned real quick how fast I could heat my 1400 square ft home!! For the first week or so, if I could keep it under 78 I was happy!! Never spent so many evenings with the doors hangin open!! I got to just loading small loads, cause if I loaded it full, I just couldn't keep it comfortable. I'd load small, and when I got home, I'd tinker with it for a bit ketting the fire going, then at night do a small load and play with it some more before work. On the weekends, or if the wife was home through the day, it wasn't bad,
cause you could just tend it as needed and load it while you still had good coals to work with. If no one was going to be around or we wouldn't be home for an extended period, I'd load it up full, just so there were coals when we got back( 9 hrs was about max for that). But man, I know the temps while we were gone were over 80. I got by that winter figureing it was learning pains. Then I came across the draft kit and thought in theory it sounded ok.
So that brings us to last winter. I put this thing together and have my fan control set for 120 fan on, 100 fan off. There is absolutly no instructions on operation with this thing what so ever, so I'm quessing at exactlly how to run it. I fire the stove and as it hits the burn zone, I shut every damper, except the flap on the draft motor, say halfway. In about 5 minutes, I have stack temps around 100 degrees, so the fire is definatlly dropped back. I set my thermostat up wich brings the draft inducer on, and I expect to see some major action before too long. Nothing! After about 10 minutes, I open the flap on the inducer all the way. Still nothing. So I open the slide damper on the door, and within minutes I can see the coals starting to liven up and eventially the fire is up and running. The whole time the draft motor is running. Once the fire is good and established, I close the damper on the door and just have the flap on the motor open. The fire does die back some, but not enough to cool to the point to shut my main fan off. So the house gets warm, the draft motor shuts of once the stat is satisfied, and the fan just keeps running and before too long its 80 in the house again! Basiclly all winter was shades of the same thing just at different fan settings and damper positions. I couldn't find a point that the inducer alone would stoke the fire up, and if the fire was going good, a point that with just the inducer flap open and the inducer motor off, that the stove would die back enough to kick the main fan off to avoid over heating the house. So I turn it all off, and just burn it like the first year. So this year I'd like to finally be comfortable that I'm using this the best I can. I have yet to use the stove because the temps wont get out of the upper 50's! A few things to point out...I was useing 1 year old oak, wich I'm starting to come to the conclusion that I wouldn't call it dry unless its been stacked for two years. So the wood was probablly less than ideal. I didn't have a barometric on the stove, just a manual. I have installed one this summer to maybe try some coal this winter also. I'ts currenttly set at .08, so maybe that will make a difference. Also, I have a stainless steel liner. So finally - QUESTIONS. Does the draft kit do what I'm expecting it to do? If not what does it do? With the liner, should I be concerned with cresote at all? If so, how are you supposed to use a draft fan and let the fire die back without your fire smoldering and creating cresote? What kind of fan settings are you useing and how big of a house are you heating? Thanks in advance for
any help...without someone here beside me to hold my hand, this forum seems to be the next best thing! :? Thanks Mike
Oh for you clayton owners, my draft fan blows in the back of the stove just above the fire brick instead of up through the grates. Yours is a much better design I beleive.
Last edited by coaledsweat on Fri Nov 27, 2009 11:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: I don't know how you did it, but it was impossible to read as posted
gusarch
 
Stove/Furnace Make: US Stove Company
Stove/Furnace Model: Hotblast 1557M

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: Bruce4444 On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 12:16 am

Okay guys, I need some advice. I just installed a Hotblast 1557G. I was burning up a box full of wood in 4 hours, so I called the factory and was told to put a damper in the chimney pipe and a barimetric air regulator on the chimney pipe. I have done both. The fire in the box was really taking off with the damperopen, but I can't seem to get much more than luke warm air out of the blowers. I know there is an art to getting the right tuning going to really produce some heat, and that's what I'm looking for.... I have an air inducer on the firebox. Should I be having it on? How many turns should I have the ash door damper open, if any? It has a blower thermostat with 3 setting pegs. What do they need to be set on? Sorry for all the questions, but I am (or was) a Florida boy and I gotta get this thing working, if you know what I mean. Thanks
Bruce4444
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Hotblast
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557G

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: WNY On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 8:51 am

Bruce4444,if you are burning wood, you shouldn't need a Baro Damper, just a Manual hand damper , which should be between the baro and stove, if you have both, not the other way around!. If you have the Manual damper above the Baro, you could cut off the exhaust and it would leak out the Baro Damper into your house! :(

The baro can build up with creosote and not work correctly, and if you were to have a chimney fire, the baro would let more air in to fuel the fire up the stack.
WNY
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90K, Leisure Line Hyfire I
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, LL & CoalTrol
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Hyfire I, VF3000 Soon

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: Stephen in Soky On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 10:12 am

I used the equivalent to your furnace for many years in my unfinished basement.While I realize Baro's are frowned upon in wood fired appliances, without one my furnace was useless. I had an external Duraplus chimney with so much draft I could never keep a fire more than 5 hours and literally all my heat was escaping up my chimney. This was with prime, well seasoned oak/hickory. I installed a baro and my furnace instantly became a viable heating source, where it wasn't before. I still wasn't completely satisfied and added an outdoor air supply, and wow, all the sudden I was turning back the bi-mettalic to avoid overheating the house. I kept my baro flap reasonably clean with a small wire bristle brush. By burning quality well seasoned wood it really wasn't much of a chore as I had minimal build up throughout the season. It literally took me from a useless furnace to a very effective system for a minimal investment of time & cash.
Stephen in Soky
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warm Morning
Stove/Furnace Model: 500

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: Bruce4444 On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 5:21 pm

I appreciate the input. The factory has the baro damper first, then the solid one in the pipe, so that's how I installed it. I just can't get a lot of heat out. Do I always keep the fan on that forces air into the fire box?
Bruce4444
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Hotblast
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557G

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: gitrdonecoal On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 5:38 pm

depends how you look at it. last year i did before i had duct work put up. bad mistake, pull out your pocket book to pay the electric company, i know first hand. now USSC says you must use the blowers so you do not overfire the unit. the only time my blowers come on is when its really cold. since then i put up some FREE duct work and when its 25 and above the fans rarely come on because the heat radiates through the duct into the house (1000 sq ft ranch). if i were you i would get a 120 thermostat for your hotblast. i just put mine in a month ago and works great. only twenty bucks at home depot, it is a honeywell used for 220 electric baseboard as well, but works for 110. this is how i wired it in:
power comes in through the cord. on the back of the unit pull off the left side wire on the thermodisc. attach that wire so the power goes through the thermostat, then comes back down through the thermodisc, then through the blower fans. this way if the thermostat calls for heat and the fire is weak or even out, it does not run and run and run forever blowing cold air. in other words, the thermostat must kick on for 72 degrees (or whatever you set it for) then the plenum must be about the 150 degree setting in order to engage the blower fans. the loop works nice
gitrdonecoal
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90
Stove/Furnace Make: USSC
Stove/Furnace Model: Hotblast 1557

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: gitrdonecoal On: Mon Jan 11, 2010 12:22 pm

well im afraid to report that im just gonna burn wood the rest of the winter. i did a quick figure and figured that i've only burnt a chord and a half so far cause i've been burning coal. i measured all the wood i got and came up with 22 face cord! better use it or lose it i guess, at this rate it would take over 5 years to burn all of it, making the wood punky. i dont mind, its all free minus the work ;)
gitrdonecoal
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90
Stove/Furnace Make: USSC
Stove/Furnace Model: Hotblast 1557

Re: wood in a hotblast

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:25 pm

Free is good.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea