ash buildup

ash buildup

PostBy: friendsville BoB On: Mon Jan 15, 2007 2:57 pm

Help.. This is my first year at this.I have taken all the tips from the forum,and they have helped me get started . I have a harmon mark 3 and after 3 or four days I lose my fire? I think it is because of ash buildup.I shake at least twice a day, but when my stove goes out I have a ton of ash in the bottom.I don't get it? aslo this stove is about 8 years old and the three grates inside seem to be Bellied.. Please help if you know the cause. Thanks
friendsville BoB
 

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Mon Jan 15, 2007 3:46 pm

Do the grates shake well? You should shake it down until you see some small glowing coals dropping into the ash pan, you aren't done shaking until you see them. Before you shake, open the ash door and pull out the tray a little and let the fire heat up for a few minutes and then shake. Never shake a cool fire! You must empty the ash pan too. This is where the air comes to feed the fire, you don't want to choke it off with ash. Never leave it full. After shaking, bank the fire with a small rake or hoe to get some hot coals to the top of the box and put the fresh coal into the depression you made. Just putting the coal evenly across the top may be smothering it. I'm not sure about the Harmon but most you bank to the door and then fill it at the rear. You need an active fire on the surface, that is why it has to be banked.

I notice your unit is 8 years old. I would recommend that you check the door gasket. You can use a cigarrette or candle to check. Just run it around the door where it meets the stove to see if it draws the smoke or flame. Overfire air is a no-no with anthracite. The gaskets are common and can be purchased almost anywhere that deals with wood/coal units.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

PostBy: friendsville BoB On: Mon Jan 15, 2007 4:59 pm

coaledsweat wrote:Do the grates shake well? You should shake it down until you see some small glowing coals dropping into the ash pan, you aren't done shaking until you see them. Before you shake, open the ash door and pull out the tray a little and let the fire heat up for a few minutes and then shake. Never shake a cool fire! You must empty the ash pan too. This is where the air comes to feed the fire, you don't want to choke it off with ash. Never leave it full. After shaking, bank the fire with a small rake or hoe to get some hot coals to the top of the box and put the fresh coal into the depression you made. Just putting the coal evenly across the top may be smothering it. I'm not sure about the Harmon but most you bank to the door and then fill it at the rear. You need an active fire on the surface, that is why it has to be banked.

I notice your unit is 8 years old. I would recommend that you check the door gasket. You can use a cigarrette or candle to check. Just run it around the door where it meets the stove to see if it draws the smoke or flame. Overfire air is a no-no with anthracite. The gaskets are common and can be purchased almost anywhere that deals with wood/coal units.
friendsville BoB
 


PostBy: friendsville BoB On: Wed Jan 17, 2007 6:28 pm

thank you coldedsweat your tips helped alot making it burn hot BEFORE i\I shake it down seems to work wonders Friendsville Bob
friendsville BoB
 

top air flow with anthracite

PostBy: Rita On: Fri Apr 13, 2007 11:49 am

Coaledsweat wrote:

notice your unit is 8 years old. I would recommend that you check the door gasket. You can use a cigarrette or candle to check. Just run it around the door where it meets the stove to see if it draws the smoke or flame. Overfire air is a no-no with anthracite. The gaskets are common and can be purchased almost anywhere that deals with wood/coal units.

Does this mean that on my harmon coal/wood furnance I don't need to have those two air flow knobs on the front door open slightly when I burn the anthracite? I am a first year coal user and the manual told me for coal to open them a bit, maybe that is why I am not getting as long a burn as I feel I should.
Rita
 

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Fri Apr 13, 2007 12:01 pm

Anthracite wants all the air to come from below, overfire air will reduce your heat output and increase the amount of trouble you have with your fire. I would close the overfire vents completly. If you burn bituminous coal it would require some overfire air, the amount would depend on the quality of the coal.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

PostBy: Rita On: Fri Apr 13, 2007 1:49 pm

many thanks coaledsweat for your quick response and help, I can't begin to tell you how much this forum has helped me. I am sure happy to have found it.
Rita