circulator pump

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: ODDSNENDS4U On: Sun Dec 27, 2009 8:28 am

bighouse wrote:Hi, Stoker man helped me with same problem. My pumps also only ran 1 min. Turns out, plumber who installed did not do it as manual instructed. He only used one inlet on furnace and did not install a bypass loop. If furnace is installed correctly with use of both inlet and and a bypass, then pumps should run longer and get heat to last radiators quicker. Hope this helps.

Hi,
I have a bypass loop but I am still not sure what you mean by( he only used one inlet?)
I was told that there is a lever in the thermostat that I can adjust. But I am not sure which way to go with it. Any suggestions?
Dennis
ODDSNENDS4U
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: ODDSNENDS4U On: Sun Dec 27, 2009 8:30 am

In the bypass loop there is a gate valve. Should that be mostly closed or mostly open or just in between?
Dennis
ODDSNENDS4U
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: stoker-man On: Sun Dec 27, 2009 12:18 pm

You must use both returns if you want the aquastat to work properly. You can adjust the valves according to your needs. Start with both at 50% and work from there.

Reasons for Using Both Return Lines and Bypass Line

Read up on that thread.
stoker-man
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: 1981 efm wcb-24 in use 365 days a year
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Chestnut
Other Heating: Hearthstone wood stove

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: Normy On: Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:12 pm

stoker-man wrote:You must use both returns if you want the aquastat to work properly. You can adjust the valves according to your needs. Start with both at 50% and work from there.

Reasons for Using Both Return Lines and Bypass Line

Read up on that thread.



Hi, I also question how to properly adjust the bypass valves. I've read and re-read the threads you suggest, and I'm still not sure what an ideal setting would be.

So, may I ask what scenario's best describe a particular valve setting?

How can I identify what to look for when making valve changes? I guess I'm asking 'How do I know when I have it "dialed-in" for my particular situation'?

Not knowing the other parts of the country, but coming from New England, we get such temperature swings day to day & week to week, would this be something that I need to take into consideration? Yesterday was about 53 deg, today was 32 deg, who knows want tomorrow will be?

Thanks
Normy
Normy
 
Coal Size/Type: rice
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: stoker-man On: Tue Dec 29, 2009 6:54 am

In our own setting, I force about 50% of the water back into the supply line. The reason is that there is more water in the lines than in the boiler and it was getting flooded with cold water in the morning, causing the outfire control to shut down the stoker (only twice). Even still, until the place gets heated up, the boiler barely goes above 150 degrees with the circulators on which might take 8 hours. The bypass also helps to prevent stratification while the boiler is idle because the water will roll with gravity.

I think it's more important that both return lines be used.
stoker-man
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: 1981 efm wcb-24 in use 365 days a year
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Chestnut
Other Heating: Hearthstone wood stove

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: ODDSNENDS4U On: Tue Dec 29, 2009 8:56 am

Hi,
Remember the thread ( Furnace always building pressure ). I am still having a problem there too!! I took the taco 3rd taco (reducing) valve off. took it back to Reading foundry and got another about a week ago and I am still overpressuring. I am totally lost on this and am soon going to have to break down and call a plumber. Any ideas on who to call in the Pottsville area (who will not rape my bank account). I would like to get someone here who knows alot about hydronic systems and can solve my problem without hit and miss. I can only solve the problem by turning the feedvalve before the prv off. Which I know is not acceptable and dangerous!!
Dennis
ODDSNENDS4U
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: ODDSNENDS4U On: Tue Dec 29, 2009 9:04 am

I bought a new thermoatat and installed it in the hall of the new area I am heating now and it took care of my circulator problem. The first rooms on the loop are getting a bit warmer now but will deal with that later once I get everything else straightened out. ( next question is: How many sq. feet can I heat with my 520. I am going 2 floors and about 3600 sq ft right now and would like to add another floor. I believe I would have to add a 3rd circulator pump and thermostat control. But I dont want to over tax the boiler.
Dennis
ODDSNENDS4U
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: stoker-man On: Tue Dec 29, 2009 9:10 am

You can run your boiler 24/7 if you want or need to. If the new addition causes the stoker to fall behind, then you've exceeded its capacity. You'll probably be OK.
stoker-man
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: 1981 efm wcb-24 in use 365 days a year
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Chestnut
Other Heating: Hearthstone wood stove

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: Sting On: Tue Dec 29, 2009 10:36 am

ODDSNENDS4U wrote:Hi,
Remember the thread ( Furnace always building pressure ). I am still having a problem there too!! I can only solve the problem by turning the feedvalve before the prv off. Which I know is not acceptable and dangerous!!
Dennis


If isolating the feed water fixes the problem -- the Pressure-Reducing or “Feed” Valve" is defective and needs to be changed out


http://www.bellgossett.com/literature/files/1195.pdf
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.


I know some may be sick of this link above -- I post and refer to it a lot -- but it explains what you need to know about the individual parts of your system. Start at page 6 regarding this faulty valve - what it should be doing and how to set it once you have it changed. - Heck read the whole thing -- It can't hurt

Kind Regards
Sting
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: Pa Dealer On: Tue Dec 29, 2009 6:20 pm

ODDSNENDS4U wrote:I bought a new thermoatat and installed it in the hall of the new area I am heating now and it took care of my circulator problem. The first rooms on the loop are getting a bit warmer now but will deal with that later once I get everything else straightened out. ( next question is: How many sq. feet can I heat with my 520. I am going 2 floors and about 3600 sq ft right now and would like to add another floor. I believe I would have to add a 3rd circulator pump and thermostat control. But I dont want to over tax the boiler.
Dennis



With multiple zones it's unlikly that all will be calling for heat at the same time,so the demand won't be to bad.





ry
Pa Dealer
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520 DF
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM DF 520
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: Sting On: Tue Dec 29, 2009 7:44 pm

hummmmm

A dealer will always tell a customer ( well most dealers ) that the boiler they want to sell will do the job because the zones won't all call at the same time - or the appliance is under rated - or 27 other excuses :?

The only way to know if the boiler can heat the house, is to do a lucid heat loss calculation on that load.

http://www.pvsullivan.com/Downloads.html

Download this heat loss calculator if you want to do the best job for your self

or

Here’s an example of a no brainer version:

http://www.builditsolar.com/References/ ... atLoss.htm

Then -- remember that boilers and furnaces and the little stoves folks huddle around are rated at input -- but its the output your going to enjoy. So -- you only get 70% of the MFG rating to work with. Now if that 70 percent is greater or equal to the heat loss calculation, yet not too great so the boiler or air scorcher to load ratio is unbalanced --


You got a winner.
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: Pa Dealer On: Tue Dec 29, 2009 11:10 pm

Heat loss calculators are good if you know your ins. values [walls ceilings glass ,doors and floors] which are somtimes guessed at.Never installed an under sized boiler :D but I'm sure it happens. On new home installs my technique involves tea leaves,chicken heads and gun powder but thats just me.







ry
Pa Dealer
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520 DF
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM DF 520
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: Normy On: Wed Dec 30, 2009 12:53 am

Normy wrote:
stoker-man wrote:You must use both returns if you want the aquastat to work properly. You can adjust the valves according to your needs. Start with both at 50% and work from there.

Reasons for Using Both Return Lines and Bypass Line

Read up on that thread.



Hi, I also question how to properly adjust the bypass valves. I've read and re-read the threads you suggest, and I'm still not sure what an ideal setting would be.

So, may I ask what scenario's best describe a particular valve setting?

How can I identify what to look for when making valve changes? I guess I'm asking 'How do I know when I have it "dialed-in" for my particular situation'?

Not knowing the other parts of the country, but coming from New England, we get such temperature swings day to day & week to week, would this be something that I need to take into consideration? Yesterday was about 53 deg, today was 32 deg, who knows want tomorrow will be?

Thanks
Normy


Well Tomorrow (today /tonight) was 9 deg and super windy, didn't use as much coal as I thought I would have :D . Hearing that 50's and rain is coming very soon.

Stokerman, thanks for the info on the balance valve, I'll start messing with them and see if I can get an understanding on what works best in my situation.

Thanks,
Normy
Normy
 
Coal Size/Type: rice
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: stoker-man On: Wed Dec 30, 2009 9:00 am

For PA dealer: We have one dealer that installs a PK750 with B & G circulator in every single job. Doesn't matter if the house is 500 sq. ft or 5000 sq. ft. His reasoning: What if they decide to put on an addition.
stoker-man
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: 1981 efm wcb-24 in use 365 days a year
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Chestnut
Other Heating: Hearthstone wood stove

Re: circulator pump

PostBy: Sting On: Wed Dec 30, 2009 9:22 am

stoker-man wrote:For PA dealer: We have one dealer that installs a PK750 with B & G circulator in every single job. Doesn't matter if the house is 500 sq. ft or 5000 sq. ft. His reasoning: What if they decide to put on an addition.


This is exactly why home owners are unsatisfied - and a practice that has gone on for years - that does not make it right.

This mentality is no better than the guy that installs a boiler capable of heating 5000 square feet in a 500 square foot house.

Image
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas