air flow yukon husky

air flow yukon husky

PostBy: firedup On: Sat Jan 02, 2010 1:20 pm

new to site. some quick info before question. 1983 yukon husky multi-fuel furnace. 25"x20"x8"deep.2shaker grates,40 slots per grate 1/2inch wide slots.20 tong poker for ease of breaking up bridges. four 3/4" holes in ash pan with 4" inch dia. damper plate installed. manometer reads .04. 8" masonry chimney, 25ft high w/cap over top of peak no thermometers on stove or flue yet. my question is, the furnace has a primary air feed damper controlled by thermostat in living room. its not very reactive so i'm thinking of removing the damper altogether. it would be replaced by a small cabinet fan speed controlled by a rheostat and turned on and off by a low limit switch. (e.g.something like a stove stat only reverse, turns on low and turns off high ) it would mount on face of fire door. would this keep a more consistant temp? anyone have any thoughts on this?
firedup
 
Stove/Furnace Make: yukon
Stove/Furnace Model: 1983 yukon husky multi fuel

Re: air flow yukon husky

PostBy: ohabanero On: Sat Jan 02, 2010 2:01 pm

are you talking about air forced intake? in otherwords pushing air INTO the firebox?
ohabanero
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Efel Arden giant 084—65 (2 of them)
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: modified Gibraltar not sure of model double door model
Coal Size/Type: chestnut
Other Heating: Burnham boiler #2 fuel oil
Stove/Furnace Make: efel and gibralter
Stove/Furnace Model: burnham boiler

Re: air flow yukon husky

PostBy: firedup On: Sat Jan 02, 2010 7:03 pm

yes, that is correct. it would be at a slow fan speed
firedup
 
Stove/Furnace Make: yukon
Stove/Furnace Model: 1983 yukon husky multi fuel

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Re: air flow yukon husky

PostBy: ohabanero On: Sun Jan 03, 2010 9:59 am

ok. I will admit I don't know the exact specifics of your machine because I have never seen one except in pictures, but in general I would highly caution against this plan because it is potentially dangerous. Forcing the intake burn draft vacuum from the intake end makes it no longer a vacuum, but now a pressurized situation where combustion gases could, in the event of poor draft (for many different reasons beyond your control) push their way into your living space and kill you. Much better would be a similar setup electrically, only leaving your intake as it is and install a forced DRAFT inducer in the flue pipe (controlled by your described electricals). I have seen these in action, and although it seems they might require a bit of maintenance (never used one myself) would be very effective and FAR SAFER.
There is a potential for problems here as well though, because your unit if like the newer ones, probably has a barometric damper installed in the flue. You will wanna speak to someone knowledgeable in setting up solid fuel systems in homes about the potential problems to your system on installing forced DRAFT inducers in flues with Baro damper, and just how to do that if its even possible. Key questions here would be. is it possible? should it be positioned above or below? and does the baro need adjusted accordingly to the new system? I would think you might even have to eliminate a baro to run forced draft but not sure. all this stuff is key to your safety however. so dont experiment with this without doing your homework first
Another thought... have you ever actually had your draft checked out? Perhaps you have a baro that is set improperly that fixing would solve a lot of your slow firing response problem. The forum has a loaner program for these (manometers). I would think from burning the hand fired appliances I have, that with coal, youre going to need some patience, but not familiar with all that complicated automatic stuff to know for sure.
One more thing to consider. Relocate your thermostat to a place that is closer to the floor or in a cool pocket in your home but that gets good warm air when your plenum blower kicks on. this might get you the fire you need sooner, but not overwarm the house... might take some experimentation for a little while with thermometers to find just the right spot tho.
Lastly... can you bump up a size in coal and stay within your appliances guidelines? larger coal may also help. It would depend on your firebox and grate. larger coal MAY do nothing for your problem.
I think, but not sure, that the only appliances I have ever seen FORCED INTAKE on, which is what youre considering, are OUTDOOR furnace or boilers, where it would not matter if there was firebox fluegas leakage until draft caught up. Inside the home you DONT WANNA GO THERE.
I do know one methiod of providing instant heat for sure. Have it here at my place. OIL ;) but we dont wanna go there either
Hope this helps.
Mark
ohabanero
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Efel Arden giant 084—65 (2 of them)
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: modified Gibraltar not sure of model double door model
Coal Size/Type: chestnut
Other Heating: Burnham boiler #2 fuel oil
Stove/Furnace Make: efel and gibralter
Stove/Furnace Model: burnham boiler

Re: air flow yukon husky

PostBy: firedup On: Sun Jan 03, 2010 11:31 am

hi mark, you bring up a good point. i am only thinking about this cause thats how my reading auto feed stove works upstairs. air is blown in through 1/8" holes in the burn plate under the coal. it to has a baro. this is my first year using the beast downstairs. as stated earlier, i do have a mano hooked up and running @ .04. the mfr. advises no more than .03. i'm not comfortable with that setting and neither was the furnace. the coal size is mostly nut mixed with stove. furnace is running very efficient right now as i sit here hunting and pecking. fired it up sat. 6am, poked from underneath last night, no shake. full bed of coal with blue flame this morning. poked from under again, shook lightly, (hardly any ash yet, concerned about shaking too vigorously) topped off coal and still blue flame and 75*. weather here in western n.y. is 20* with wind chill @ 0*. maybe im not shaking hard enough? air flow trouble usually after 5 to 7 days or when it gets above 30*.
kurt
firedup
 
Stove/Furnace Make: yukon
Stove/Furnace Model: 1983 yukon husky multi fuel

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