Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

PostBy: BigBarney On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:57 am

Richard:

How do you get a picture with that blue flame color? When I

take a picture the blue seems washed out,but with my eye

the blue is there.Are you using a filter to suppress the red

and orange to enhance the blue? What filter?

Thank You:



BigBarney
BigBarney
 

Re: Picture Help?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 12:01 pm

Greg (lsFarm) took that picture, its from a very big fire. I'm really not the person to be asking about how to take a picture. I'll split this, there are a few people on here with a lot of photo knowledge.

Edit: that's not exact same one but is from same series he took.
Attachments
coal-fire.jpg
(84.74 KiB) Viewed 40 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]17772[/nepathumb]
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

PostBy: SMITTY On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 12:12 pm

No flash ... that's the only trick.

Image
SMITTY
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Patriot Coal - custom built by Jim Dorsey
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III (not currently in use)
Coal Size/Type: Rice / Blaschak anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired Burnham boiler


Re: Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

PostBy: Poconoeagle On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 12:17 pm

no flash even eyephone can do it ;)
kodiak blue_edited.jpg
(34.68 KiB) Viewed 23 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]17775[/nepathumb]
Poconoeagle
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Buckwalter & Co. , EFM520
Stove/Furnace Model: No. 28 Glenwood 1880, Alaska

Re: Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

PostBy: WNY On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 12:18 pm

No Flash, use a tripod if you have to, slow shutter speed (if you can). Time exposure of a second usually works, of course many automatic cameras can be set this way, but at least turn the flash off and hold it steady.
WNY
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90K, Leisure Line Hyfire I
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, LL & CoalTrol
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Hyfire I, VF3000 Soon

Re: Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

PostBy: Richard S. On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 12:33 pm

I'd imagine the angle and the nice black background has a lot to do with how good Greg's image looks.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

PostBy: rockwood On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 12:54 pm

No lights on in the room seems to help too.
Attachments
100_1006-1.jpg
100_1006-1.jpg (8.43 KiB) Viewed 3854 times
Select:BBcode:
[nepafile=17782]100_1006-1.jpg[/nepafile]
rockwood
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Stokermatic coal furnace
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Rockwood Stoveworks Circulator
Baseburners & Antiques: Malleable/Monarch Range
Coal Size/Type: Soft coal: Lump and stoker (slack coal)

Re: Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

PostBy: rangaller On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 1:19 pm

If you use a point and shoot digital camera the metering component of the camera will average out the high and low exposure areas and give you an "average" exposure value. With a DSLR (digital single lens reflex) you have an ability to overide the metering system to expose for a particular component in an image.

The problem in capturing the blue flame as you see it is because the meter is being biased by the bright orange coals and causes the meter to underexpose and suppress the deeper blue flames. To get the flames to appear you would need to slightly overexpose an average meter reading so that the blue flames become more visable. The problem with this is that the orange coals will be overexposed.

The problem with nearly all digital cameras is that they do not have the dynamic range that film has. Therefore, there is a compromise on the image output. You can solve the problem by taking a High Dynamic Range, multiple exposure image, from a tripod, and fuse them together in Photoshop or some other HDR specific software.

Stephen
rangaller
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alternate Heating
Stove/Furnace Model: AHS S130

Re: Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

PostBy: BigBarney On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 2:19 pm

I will try all these suggestions and see where it takes me.

My boiler has a secondary air feed throttle valve on the side so thats

where I shot the pictures thru,I may remove the valve to get a better

shot. I burn bituminous coal and am able to always get a blue flame

but the hot red coals always over power the blue ladies.

Would any filter help?


Thank You;

BigBarney
BigBarney
 

Re: Getting a Good Picture of Burning Coal

PostBy: rangaller On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 2:50 pm

[quote="BigBarney"]
Would any filter help?
[quote]

Not really. Then again.... if you have a DSLR and you have a split neutral density filter (half clear/half 2 f-stop ND filter http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/5 ... uated.html) you could rotate the ND part of the filter on the lens over the orange flames to reduce their impact on the film/sensor. This would give a more realistic dynamic range to the scene but it would require a little effort to work properly. But it could be done provided the blue ladies were dancing evenly above a horizontal layer of orange coals.

In a black and white image you could use a blue filter to pass that spectrum of light to the film/sensor... but wouldn't that defeat the original intent? :lol:

Stephen
rangaller
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alternate Heating
Stove/Furnace Model: AHS S130