Heating with coal in the midwest

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Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: voterone On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 8:28 pm

I'm a coal newbie with a few questions.

Is heating with heat with coal in the mid west a viable option? I would purchase sizable quantities and store the coal, and that leads to my next question: What is the best way to store coal (bagged/unbagged)? Also, where is the best place to buy sizable quantities of coal? Can tenders be put out to bid? Is there a difference in the quality of various brands of anthracite coal?

Any help would be most appreciated- and probably be followed up with more questions!
voterone
 

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: ken On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 10:56 pm

Well you don't say where in the midwest , big area. You probaly get somebody bring it from Pa. in bulk or bags. Bulk you can just put trap down and over and your good to go. Just trap bagged. $$$$$ no idea.
ken
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker - Rice Coal
Stove/Furnace Model: 75K - Bay Window - Direct Vent

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: voterone On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:09 pm

ken wrote:Well you don't say where in the midwest , big area. You probaly get somebody bring it from Pa. in bulk or bags. Bulk you can just put trap down and over and your good to go. Just trap bagged. $$$$$ no idea.


Omaha, Nebraska is the destination.

Given the transportation costs, I'd like to commit to 30+ tons and take it all at once.

Do you have any recommendations as to what brand might serve me best? I'm looking at Harmon stoves.
voterone
 

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Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: ken On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:18 pm

Blashcalk or Superior for coal. I think most at time in bulk would be 24 tons max. Get bags on a trailer , only know 60,000pounds is their limt. Then you got get it off. :shock:
ken
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker - Rice Coal
Stove/Furnace Model: 75K - Bay Window - Direct Vent

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: voterone On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:27 pm

ken wrote:Blashcalk or Superior for coal. I think most at time in bulk would be 24 tons max. Get bags on a trailer , only know 60,000pounds is their limt. Then you got get it off. :shock:


Thanks Ken, for the pointers.

Now, I have another question: Is coal considered a commodity or are there in reality, wide price discrepancies? Also, can you negotiate a better price depending on what part of the year you buy the coal and the quantities involved?

I got hooked on coal when I visited a friend in PA a few years ago. He had a couple of stoves and his place was toasty warm, unlike the environment my forced air system provided. It was always cold!
voterone
 

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: ken On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:38 pm

Really dosen't change much in price winter or summer in Pa. You call around find best price. Only 2 that I would buy though
.Guy said other day superior was same as last year. Theres really no making a deal with someone. Where i live its sometimes cheaper in the fall. I run a 75,000 in 2,400 sf. , at 75 in most rooms. Sleep in my boxers. Trick is moving the heat.
ken
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker - Rice Coal
Stove/Furnace Model: 75K - Bay Window - Direct Vent

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: voterone On: Tue Jan 05, 2010 11:48 pm

ken wrote:Really dosen't change much in price winter or summer in Pa. You call around find best price. Only 2 that I would buy though
.Guy said other day superior was same as last year. Theres really no making a deal with someone. Where i live its sometimes cheaper in the fall. I run a 75,000 in 2,400 sf. , at 75 in most rooms. Sleep in my boxers. Trick is moving the heat.


Good to know re price.

OK, I'll bite- How do you move the air around? Will ceiling fans do the trick?

Also, I see you're in Ohio. Have you seen increased interest in heating with coal?
voterone
 

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: ken On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 2:09 am

"I'll bite- How do you move the air around? Will ceiling fans do the trick?" Just got my butt kicked in nice poker tourney. Not in best mood , sorry. Tons info here to move heat , use the search box. Everybody has diff situation. Most went to coal when oil went to $4.00.
ken
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker - Rice Coal
Stove/Furnace Model: 75K - Bay Window - Direct Vent

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 6:18 am

To get hard coal at a decent price in the Midwest you do what Freddy did and bring in an entire truck load - you'll be set for a couple years. That's the only way to make economically feasible in my opinion. Lisa
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: Sting On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 8:58 am

How far are you from the Bituminous Coal mines on Southern Illinois :?:
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: voterone On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 9:26 am

Sting wrote:How far are you from the Bituminous Coal mines on Southern Illinois :?:


That's a lot closer to me than PA.

I was led to believe that anthracite was the way to go, though. My intention is to buy a trailer load (or two, if the price is right) and store the coal. I know absolutely zero about heating with bituminous coal.
voterone
 

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: europachris On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 9:32 am

Another option is Wyoming coal - Omaha is about the same distance from there as S. Illinois. Unfortunately, both of those options present issues in finding equipment to burn it properly compared to Anthracite.

Chris
europachris
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM 350/Iron Fireman
Stove/Furnace Model: Custom bituminous burner

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: voterone On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 9:54 am

europachris wrote:Another option is Wyoming coal - Omaha is about the same distance from there as S. Illinois. Unfortunately, both of those options present issues in finding equipment to burn it properly compared to Anthracite.

Chris


Understood, Chris.

That's why I want to go the anthracite route.

From where I sit, fuel prices (electric and gas) and taxes will go up dramatically over time. I'm willing to buy coal in quantity now, store it and use it over time. I see buying coal now as less of a hedge and more of an investment, the payoff being significantly lower heating costs over time.
voterone
 

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: europachris On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 2:06 pm

voterone wrote:Understood, Chris.

That's why I want to go the anthracite route.

From where I sit, fuel prices (electric and gas) and taxes will go up dramatically over time. I'm willing to buy coal in quantity now, store it and use it over time. I see buying coal now as less of a hedge and more of an investment, the payoff being significantly lower heating costs over time.


The upside of that idea (which is a good one) is that anthracite will not degrade when stored like bituminous and especially like the Western coals. The lower grade coals loose heating value and some of the sub-bituminous and definitely the lignite coals literally fall apart on exposure to air (and spontaneously combust when kept in very large piles). Anthracite is a rock, literally. If you had the room, you could easily store 20, 40, even 60 tons of anthracite and keep you warm for a decade.
europachris
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM 350/Iron Fireman
Stove/Furnace Model: Custom bituminous burner

Re: Heating with coal in the midwest

PostBy: voterone On: Wed Jan 06, 2010 3:12 pm

europachris wrote:
voterone wrote:Understood, Chris.

That's why I want to go the anthracite route.

From where I sit, fuel prices (electric and gas) and taxes will go up dramatically over time. I'm willing to buy coal in quantity now, store it and use it over time. I see buying coal now as less of a hedge and more of an investment, the payoff being significantly lower heating costs over time.


The upside of that idea (which is a good one) is that anthracite will not degrade when stored like bituminous and especially like the Western coals. The lower grade coals loose heating value and some of the sub-bituminous and definitely the lignite coals literally fall apart on exposure to air (and spontaneously combust when kept in very large piles). Anthracite is a rock, literally. If you had the room, you could easily store 20, 40, even 60 tons of anthracite and keep you warm for a decade.


Europachris:

Would you buy bagged or unbagged coal for long term storage? Does it make a difference?
voterone
 

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