"Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: jrn8265 On: Wed Jul 22, 2009 12:36 pm

I also keep a lightbulb on in it with a bucket of damprid as well as diconnecting the flue and covering the hole.
jrn8265
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker Koker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker 160

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: traderfjp On: Wed Jul 22, 2009 2:26 pm

I find if I clean out my stove right after I shut er down the ash is dry and powdery but if I wait it collects moisture and the job becomes more difficult. Also, if I simply clean it out I usually get the metal flaking that occurs. I know it's not a huge deal but I just wish these stoves came with a protective coating from the factory. My friend just bought a DVC500 and he said the inside of his firebox was painted so maybe they are listening. How about a teflon surface so I can cook an egg in there if I wanted :D
traderfjp
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: europachris On: Mon Jul 27, 2009 8:53 am

jrn8265 wrote:I also keep a lightbulb on in it with a bucket of damprid as well as diconnecting the flue and covering the hole.


+1 on the DampRid. I'm on my second summer with my refurbed Keystoker and all I do for shutdown is vacuum out every last bit of ash and that white residue that builds up, plug up all the holes (disconnect and remove the flue also) and then put a bucket of DampRid in the ashpit.

We have a dry basement, dehumidifier as well as central A/C that has return vents in the finished part of the basement (where the stove is), and even with the stove basically sealed up, I still have to empty the DampRid 2 or 3 times over the summer and refill it with 'stuff'. But, it pays off because I don't get a single speck of rust inside the stove during the summer.

chris
europachris
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM 350/Iron Fireman
Stove/Furnace Model: Custom bituminous burner


Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: jrn8265 On: Wed Aug 19, 2009 8:50 am

I am really debating the whole baking soda wash thing if your stoker is in a "normal" not very high humidity basement.

I performed a test on metal that had the ash wiped and then washed 4 months ago compared to metal that had the ash and just wiped no baking soda wash done on it.

Today the non-baking soda washed metal has NO rust. The Baking soda washed metal does.

So, I am going to just vacume and wipe down my koker real good inside from this point on and forget the wash.

Just sharing my experiences here with this.
jrn8265
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker Koker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker 160

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: brckwlt On: Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:10 pm

jrn8265 wrote:I am really debating the whole baking soda wash thing if your stoker is in a "normal" not very high humidity basement.

I performed a test on metal that had the ash wiped and then washed 4 months ago compared to metal that had the ash and just wiped no baking soda wash done on it.

Today the non-baking soda washed metal has NO rust. The Baking soda washed metal does.

So, I am going to just vacume and wipe down my koker real good inside from this point on and forget the wash.

Just sharing my experiences here with this.


In the next week or so im going to "summerize" if that is a word my father in laws stove and want to do it right.

what are the benefits of cleaning out the inside of the stove with baking soda?

couldnt i just vacuum out the inside of the stove and coat it with lps 3 and be done with it?

if there is rust inside the stove is it alright to wire brush the rust off?

Also i saw mentioned earlier about removing the fire brick from the stove? is it necessary and why?

instead of taking the chimney pipe off the stove could i just jam insulation in the baro opening if i take the baro off?

his basement has a lot of humidity in it and he runs a de humidifier that doesnt seem to do the trick

thanx for any and all help
brckwlt
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Axeman-Anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: Rebuilt 1953 AA-130

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Sat Apr 03, 2010 8:27 am

brckwlt wrote:[


what are the benefits of cleaning out the inside of the stove with baking soda?

****I'm told the baking soda detoxes the acid found in the coal ash. When I did my stove with the baking soda the first time it foamed. I don't know that it stops the rust but it stops the pitting that the ash creates.

couldnt i just vacuum out the inside of the stove and coat it with lps 3 and be done with it?

****yes, you can whether you do anything or not the stove is going to have a life span of 25 or 30 years. The problem with just vacuuming it out and coating it with the lps3 is that you haven't done anything to stop the existing rust. I went to the Auto parts store and got some Rust Stop, which kills the rust and turns black. It will burn off in the fall but in the meantime, I've stopped the rust from spreading or getting worse.

if there is rust inside the stove is it alright to wire brush the rust off?

***Sure, why not? It's just awkward and has many nooks and crannies.

Also i saw mentioned earlier about removing the fire brick from the stove? is it necessary and why?

****You may find deposits of ash behind the bricks which in time could eat through the metal. Obviously, you'd want to avoid that. Also some of your fire bricks maybe cracked and need to be replaced. I replaced six of mine this year because I didn't want to have to deal with them breaking all the way during the heat season.

instead of taking the chimney pipe off the stove could i just jam insulation in the baro opening if i take the baro off?

****How much humidity does the basement have. I always disconnect my chimney connector pipe from the stove and thimble and put a pipe end cap on the thimble. That keeps the outside air out of the house. I also put a pipe end cap on the stove's pipe exit. That keeps any humidity from the room out. I take the barro off the pipe and clean it really well in baking soda wash. Then I put all the stove equipment, gloves, barro, pipes, etc, inside the stove with a damp rid and close the door. It works for me; i know where everything is in the fall and I've had no new rust since I started doing this 3 years ago.

his basement has a lot of humidity in it and he runs a de humidifier that doesnt seem to do the trick My o

****All the more reason to clean everything, do something to stop and control the rust and then shut everything up in the air tight stove with a damp rid. You may also want to check the outside for signs of rusts and treat them as well and be sure to check the door gaskets. Good Luck, Lisa

thanx for any and all help
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: traderfjp On: Sat Apr 03, 2010 10:40 am

From readng all the post I think your best bet is to wire brush and vaccum, spray interior with an LP3 type product, close all ducts, flue, etc., add a 50 watt bulb and be done with it. This will be my summerizing method. I will go one step further and clean out all my motors, outside DV flange, etc. Also, check out all your seals and pull your grate so you can clean under that too.
Last edited by traderfjp on Sat Apr 03, 2010 4:22 pm, edited 2 times in total.
traderfjp
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: brckwlt On: Sat Apr 03, 2010 1:08 pm

thanx for all the help lisa and traderfjp ...

what is damp rid?
brckwlt
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Axeman-Anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: Rebuilt 1953 AA-130

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: brckwlt On: Sat Apr 03, 2010 1:59 pm

i went to the auto store and bought duplicolor rust fix
http://www.duplicolor.com/products/rustfix.html
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.
. Is this the same as you were describing earlier. the can says ... Rust Fix® rust treatment destroys rust on contact. It sprays on clear and turns to a black metal-protecting coating to fight future rust from forming.

I just want to be clear on this. should i first vacuum out the inside of the stove,take out the fire brick and inspect it, wire brush off the rust, then wash it down with the baking soda mix ( what ratio of water to baking soda?) then coat it with the duplicolor rust fix?

do i also want to be careful not to get any of the duplicolor rust fix on the burn pot?


what should be done to clean the motors? the stove is a harman magnum
brckwlt
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Axeman-Anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: Rebuilt 1953 AA-130

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Sat Apr 03, 2010 5:11 pm

brckwlt wrote:i went to the auto store and bought duplicolor rust fix
http://www.duplicolor.com/products/rustfix.html
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.
. Is this the same as you were describing earlier. the can says ... Rust Fix® rust treatment destroys rust on contact. It sprays on clear and turns to a black metal-protecting coating to fight future rust from forming.

****That's the stuff I used. I used it last year too and did not have any additional rust form over this past summer.

I just want to be clear on this. should i first vacuum out the inside of the stove,take out the fire brick and inspect it, wire brush off the rust, then wash it down with the baking soda mix ( what ratio of water to baking soda?) then coat it with the duplicolor rust fix?

****I vacuumed really well, removed the fire bricks, vacuumed some more, didn't do any wire brushing or sanding. The Rust Fix is supposed to penetrate and kill the rust without it. If it looked ugly I might have done some sanding/brushing but I caught it early so there wasn't any surface roughness in my stove. Then I washed it down with baking soda mix/water mix - 1 cup to 1 gallon is the ratio I heard. After that is dry, I use a damp rag and vacuum again to get up any residual baking soda. Then I spray Rust Fix on the fire box walls where the rust is starting or had been in the past. Replace the fire bricks. This year I notice the loading door was getting some rust so I treated that, too, but general I don't treat things I can replace easily, like the grates or the black pipes.

do i also want to be careful not to get any of the duplicolor rust fix on the burn pot?

***I asked my husband who works with a similar product in his job and he said that it shouldn't matter. It is all going to burn off the first time it is fired in the fall anyway. Supposedly, rust won't form in the hot stove so it's the humid summer air you are worried about. When it burns off in the fall it will have already done its job. I usually lite my stove in early Oct so I can have the windows open to eliminate the any fumes.

what should be done to clean the motors? the stove is a harman magnum


*** I have no idea about the motors because I have a Mark II.

****One thing to check for is does the Magnum have a top baffle? With my Mark II I can slide my hand inside the load door and up to the ceiling of the stove. There is a "false ceiling" or baffle there that directs the air flow to the rear exit. Flyash gathers on this "shelf." If you find one in the Magnum you'll have to vacuum it the best that you can. I'm unable to wash it down with the baking soda mix so vacuuming has to do. You'll also want to check for an ash build up behind the rear baffle, in front of the exit hole if the magnum has one.

Damp Rid is a product you find at HD Depot or Ace hardware that draws moisture from the air. When put in an air tight stove it helps control the humidity and stop rust from forming. If you decide to get Damp Rid you will need to get a pipe end cap to seal off the stove and maintain the air tight seal.

Go for it, Lisa
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: traderfjp On: Sat Apr 03, 2010 5:40 pm

You're talking about rust reformer. It turns rust into a paintable surface. I think the water and baking soda will neutralized the acid from the flyash but it also activates the rusting action. My stove always looked worse the two times I did this. I think if you just vacuum your stove and keep the moisture out you'll be ahead of the game. I painted the inside of my stove with high heat paint and it peeled off. It's a messy job and if you decide to do this please use a respirator or you'll destroy your lungs. I myself like breathing. I've done enough stupid stunts without a mask when I was younger.
traderfjp
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: SMITTY On: Sun Apr 04, 2010 8:16 am

From talking with autobody people, once rust forms there's no stopping it -- your just slowing the inevitable. Painting over it just slows the process. Removal is a better way, but a pain in the ass with all the inaccessible parts in a coal stove. Stopping rust dead is pure marketing hype, although it's better than doing nothing.

I disassembled my stove as soon as the fire went out, while it was still warm. I removed the grates, doors, the metal firebrick supports, & chimney connector pipe, & brought it all upstairs where it's dry (only due to the swampy conditions in my basement -- for most this is unnecessary). I ran a 6" round wire chimney brush through the connector pipe & tapped it out outside. I left the firebrick in the basement, as there is no corrosion danger there. I then wire-wheeled all accessible sections inside the stove, wire-brushed what I could reach, & vacuumed everywhere else. Then used about 3/4 of a can of LPS-3 inside & out, & smeared it around with a paper towel. I also removed & cleaned my stainless hot water coils to avoid a repeat of last year: My HW coils are looking rough after summer in damp basement

It's a cold, wet, & lonely place down there now! :lol:
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SMITTY
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Patriot Coal - custom built by Jim Dorsey
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III (not currently in use)
Coal Size/Type: Rice / Blaschak anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired Burnham boiler

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: Rex On: Sat May 08, 2010 6:59 am

I will spray the inside with Pam cooking oil...
Rex
 
Stove/Furnace Make: D.S. Machine
Stove/Furnace Model: Circulator 1500

Re: "Summer" storage- Cleaning Coal Stove

PostBy: freetown fred On: Sat May 08, 2010 8:53 am

Rex,being econonically screwed,that PAM idea sounds real good--if worse comes to worse rust wise--we can always cook & eat the old 50-93 :lol: Thanx
Rex wrote:I will spray the inside with Pam cooking oil...
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re:

PostBy: Hunlock On: Mon May 10, 2010 10:21 am

LsFarm wrote:H Iggy, welcome to the forum.

In addition to the washing with baking soda, a thorough wire-brushing, vacuuming, there is another idea that I heard just last night.

Member EuropaChris was here picking up a Keystoker stove I brought partway home to him. We were discussing summertime corrosion. He suggested buying some of the small buckets of moisture absorbant from Home Depot or Lowes, And sealing the flue with plastic and tape, the inlets to the blower motors, and seal the doors real well: make sure the door gaskets are complete, with no gaps.

I think the surface of the steel gets impregnated with the acidic ash when it is hot, and the summer humidity is enough to activate it. The Baking soda wash helps, but doesn't stick around long enough.

If you want to coat the surfaces with an oil, WD40 is not the product to use. WD is a very good product for lots of uses, but months-long rust prevention is not one of them. WD leaves a very thin layer of silicone, and this doesn't block oxygen from getting to the steel.

Check out the LPS-3 product, it leaves a thicker, slightly sticky layer of oil that will stick on th esteel for months. It is designed for long term protection of ferrous metals.

There are other products available, hopefully several other members can add to a list of good rust preventative products and proceeedures.

Hope this helps,, Greg L

.


This is great info, and is what I currently do. The moisture absorbant works really well, but if you have a damp basement, you need to remember to change out the water-filled absorbant with dry stuff. In addition, that stuff is pretty cheap, so I put a few cans around the stove on the floor and such....Works really well!

Lots of really, really good info in this thread!
Hunlock
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Hyfire II