Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Smokey On: Sun Apr 25, 2010 5:17 am

I'm sorry, like Tamecrow said, it is model 524B that holds 200 pounds, not 520B as I mistakenly wrote.
Smokey
 

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Smokey On: Mon Apr 26, 2010 1:19 pm

This discussion seems to have stopped. I hope I didn't say anything that offended anyone. Envisage, I wasn't serious about you being jealous of the 524 model 200 pound loader. Besides, if the 524B doesn't have 4 flues, it might not be as coveted as your giant 400 model with the 4 flues.

Now I know that there are handful of models that are large enough to hold 100 pounds and therefore would work very well for me if I am lucky enough to find them. Plus, I have a record of their model numbers.

Then there is the 524B which would be like winning the lottery if I could find one. Unless of course it makes a difference if the warm morning stoves are 2 flue, 3 flue or 4 flue, because anytime I saw the model 524 it always had 2 flue or 3 flue after the model number 524. Did they make a 524(or any 200 pound loader) with a 4 flue design?

Does anyone out there know if it makes any difference, as far as the best design and efficiency, whether a warm morning stove is of the 2 flue, 3 flue or 4 flue design?

Thanks
Smokey
 

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: freetown fred On: Mon Apr 26, 2010 1:58 pm

Smokey,don't be too sensitive,it's a busy time of the year.By the way welcome :) I just got back from doin some barn fixin,it's great not to have to trudge through a crap load of snow--Later my friend :lol:
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix


Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: envisage On: Mon Apr 26, 2010 3:35 pm

LOL!!! I was not offended. Seriously though, in did not know that the 524 Model 200 held 200 pounds! :-O

Now I am jealous! That beastie must be huge. Unfortunately I do not have any experience with burning bit in a Warm Morning. I wish I did, because there is a possibility that I could get my hands on quite a bit of bit (excuse the pun), and I don't know if I should take it because I don't know how my baby will handle the soot. I have been burning Anthracite exclusively, but I understand the Warm Mornings were built primarily for bit. Mine definitely has the four flue design, which I love. I hope this thread continues because I want to know the answer too! :-)
envisage
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Werner Foundry 350a
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Warm Morning 400, Fire Boss Wood/Coal Hyrbrid
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat, Pea, Chestnut and Stove

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Smokey On: Mon Apr 26, 2010 4:21 pm

Envisage, I guess the four flue design that you have is the same thing as the "four dancing ladies" that you celebrate. So the real question would be: are 4 dancing ladies better than 3 or 2?

I bet Berlin might be able to answer the 4 flue versus less flue question because he designed his own coal stove plus he was probably already aware of the warm morning design before he made his own design. Are you out there Berlin or are you outside enjoying the warm weather?

Envisage, if you removed your beautiful enamel jacket from your 400, would it look round like the picture of the 520 in Tamecrows ad? Or is it also square underneath the jacket?
Smokey
 

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Tamecrow On: Mon Apr 26, 2010 4:35 pm

Tamecrow wrote:Thanks, so the same question still applies. Are you happy with the 520? Does it have the 4 flue system. Do you think the 420A and the 400 probably look the same as your 520 if you the jackets for the 420A and 400 were removed. Do you think that your 520 operates and has the same functional burning design as the 400?


I'm happy with the 520. It has 2 flues. I wouldn't get too hung up on the number of flues in these stoves. I had a few warm mornings over the years and they all performed great. There's no difference in the burn quality between the enameled tin models and the 'bare' 520 types. The enameled ones just look better in your living room.
Tamecrow
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warden King Ltd.
Stove/Furnace Model: Viking Jr. Boiler/Will-Burt 30

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Smokey On: Mon Apr 26, 2010 5:30 pm

Thanks for your answer Tamecrow. Thanks for telling me that the performance was the same. You say that you also have experience with the four burner types and found the performance the same. May I ask if you were comparing "apples to apples"?
That is, were you comparing your 2 flue 520 with 100 pound loading capacity with a 4 flue model that also held 100 pounds?

Please forgive me. You are a sane Canadian whereas I'm a fanatic Amercan that is used to thinking that more is better. If 2 flues are as efficient as 4 flues, then why not a model without any flues? What are those flues doing? Anything? If they aren't then why have them at all. Was it just a marketing gimic for people that like to be hypnotized by watching 4 blue flames dance out of the 4 flues(4 dancing ladies) or was that patented 4 flue system actually doing something?
Smokey
 

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Tamecrow On: Mon Apr 26, 2010 6:41 pm

Smokey, What is it you're trying to heat with this stove? Better off sizing the stove to the application rather than worrying about the number of flues. The Locke stove company designed each stove with the correct number of flues for that size and shape firebox. I've never seen a Warm Morning that didn't perform well. How many square feet are you trying to heat?
Tamecrow
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warden King Ltd.
Stove/Furnace Model: Viking Jr. Boiler/Will-Burt 30

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Smokey On: Tue Apr 27, 2010 12:08 am

OK. Time for some back round. I'm from Vermont, but I bought a farmhouse in the Smokey Mountains of Tennessee. I fell in love with the house, but I KNEW that the big ugly brown box of a heater crowding the living room was the first thing that HAD to go! It looked like an old time tube radio trying to be a heater with gaudy gold trim and old Cadillac like emblems and logos. The previous hillbilly of an owner obviously had no sense of style, proportion, aesthetics and he had certainly over estimated his BTU needs for his application. Gee, didn't he even realize he lived in the South? Oh sure, he right away started bragging on that heater saying it was "the best heater that was ever made". Of course, I was smart enough to know that he was just exaggerating the value of his goods just like a good horse trader. Either that or he was ignorant. Probably both. For goodness sake, the house was in Tennessee, not in Vermont or Nova Scotia where the real cold lives. What need did I have for a 70,000 BTU heater in the living room. Didn't the previous owner even realize he was living in the South? Oh sure, he was the nicest man around who would do anything for you. He just didn't have a clue.

Having bought the place in the middle of the summer, 80 degrees outside and crickets at night, I immediately dragged that Monster Box out of the house and drove it over to the previous owner's house with the attitude that if it really was such a great heater, he should feel grateful that I'm "giving it away" to him. Good riddance!

I immediately proceeded to civilize the house, by putting in a cute space saving base board heater. Now there was space and I would feel comfortable the whole year.

Winter rolls around and I'm freezing my butt. Probably because it was too cold at home, I spent more time at Walmart or Lowes, almost always bringing home a little plug in space heater to "fill in the gaps". After plugging in little electric fill in the gap heaters all over the house like they were Christmas tree bulbs, this Yankee finally admitted defeat. I asked around and did some serious research on that "ugly brown box" of a heater that I ejected from my abode. Turns out that ugly brown heater actually WAS the best old heater ever made. It was the kind of like the oil version of the warm morning coal stoves. It was well designed but the company went out of business as people moved on to heat pumps and propane. It's called a MONOGRAM and it has no wick, no burner to clean, no moving parts and always a delightful blue swirling flame. It's only competition was the Siegler but that was only because it was prettier and the wife had to have it. But the Siegler just produced soot when its fan went out while the MONOGRAM had a perfectly designed natural drafter that burned clean and blue everytime.

It was time to eat s-it since I had "egg on my face". So of course I call up the old geezer, cough a few times, and asked him if he'd like me to come on over an get that old heater "out of his way", cough cough. He informs me that he gave it to his sister to keep her good and warm. Pretending not to be shocked and dismayed, I hung up politely and a lot humbler than I ever had before.

I immediatley scramble to find the very same heater I had trashed only a few months earlier. After scouring old furniture stores and classifieds and old barns (this is before ebay) I finally found one, waltzed it back INTO the house. It is so perfect for the house that now, all I do is bore all my guests by bragging on that heater as being the best heater ever made. And true to the Axiom that perception of beauty follows function, since it does such a good job of keeping us warm, I am constantly amazed how I never noticed how sweetly beautiful the Monogram is as I find myself polishing the classy gold trim. What was I smoking when I called it an ugly brown box!

So, yes, I need a coal stove that really gives out the BTU's. I think the Warm Morning is under appreciated like the Chubby was and my oil MONOGRAM was. And it might be the best for Bit which happens to be nearby me. I know that a hundred pound loader like the 400 will work for me and it would not be too powerful. One poster, said that their 60 pound loader was short on some BTU's on the really cold days. And unlike wood, coal heaters don't have the problem of creating creosote when you turn them way down. So I would rather have too large a heater than too small. Plus, my wife is from the Tropics, so she enjoys cranking it up to 80 degrees in the winter, sometimes. The model 400 would be enough and I probably can't find the 200 pound loader(524) anyway. I am only interested in the 524 because it should last even longer between fillings since it holds 200 pounds. I can always turn it way down if it got too hot.

You may be right that Warm Morning always had the correct number of flues per unit. I just thought I remember an ad bragging in the "new improved version with the 4 flues". I am not a Physicist, but it seems counter intuitive that the largest Warm Morning(200 pound load model 524) would be more efficient with less flues than the smaller Warm Morning models. But what do I know? I already exposed how I learned some humility the hard way.

Smokey


















orning is under appreciated like the Chubby was
Smokey
 

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Apr 27, 2010 1:04 am

Smokey wrote:OK. Time for some back round. I'm from Vermont, but I bought a farmhouse in the Smokey Mountains of Tennessee. I fell in love with the house, but I KNEW that the big ugly brown box of a heater crowding the living room was the first thing that HAD to go! It looked like an old time tube radio trying to be a heater with gaudy gold trim and old Cadillac like emblems and logos. The previous hillbilly of an owner obviously had no sense of style, proportion, aesthetics and he had certainly over estimated his BTU needs for his application. Gee, didn't he even realize he lived in the South? Oh sure, he right away started bragging on that heater saying it was "the best heater that was ever made". Of course, I was smart enough to know that he was just exaggerating the value of his goods just like a good horse trader. Either that or he was ignorant. Probably both. For goodness sake, the house was in Tennessee, not in Vermont or Nova Scotia where the real cold lives. What need did I have for a 70,000 BTU heater in the living room. Didn't the previous owner even realize he was living in the South? Oh sure, he was the nicest man around who would do anything for you. He just didn't have a clue.

Having bought the place in the middle of the summer, 80 degrees outside and crickets at night, I immediately dragged that Monster Box out of the house and drove it over to the previous owner's house with the attitude that if it really was such a great heater, he should feel grateful that I'm "giving it away" to him. Good riddance!

I immediately proceeded to civilize the house, by putting in a cute space saving base board heater. Now there was space and I would feel comfortable the whole year.

Winter rolls around and I'm freezing my butt. Probably because it was too cold at home, I spent more time at Walmart or Lowes, almost always bringing home a little plug in space heater to "fill in the gaps". After plugging in little electric fill in the gap heaters all over the house like they were Christmas tree bulbs, this Yankee finally admitted defeat. I asked around and did some serious research on that "ugly brown box" of a heater that I ejected from my abode. Turns out that ugly brown heater actually WAS the best old heater ever made. It was the kind of like the oil version of the warm morning coal stoves. It was well designed but the company went out of business as people moved on to heat pumps and propane. It's called a MONOGRAM and it has no wick, no burner to clean, no moving parts and always a delightful blue swirling flame. It's only competition was the Siegler but that was only because it was prettier and the wife had to have it. But the Siegler just produced soot when its fan went out while the MONOGRAM had a perfectly designed natural drafter that burned clean and blue everytime.

It was time to eat s-it since I had "egg on my face". So of course I call up the old geezer, cough a few times, and asked him if he'd like me to come on over an get that old heater "out of his way", cough cough. He informs me that he gave it to his sister to keep her good and warm. Pretending not to be shocked and dismayed, I hung up politely and a lot humbler than I ever had before.

I immediatley scramble to find the very same heater I had trashed only a few months earlier. After scouring old furniture stores and classifieds and old barns (this is before ebay) I finally found one, waltzed it back INTO the house. It is so perfect for the house that now, all I do is bore all my guests by bragging on that heater as being the best heater ever made. And true to the Axiom that perception of beauty follows function, since it does such a good job of keeping us warm, I am constantly amazed how I never noticed how sweetly beautiful the Monogram is as I find myself polishing the classy gold trim. What was I smoking when I called it an ugly brown box!

So, yes, I need a coal stove that really gives out the BTU's. I think the Warm Morning is under appreciated like the Chubby was and my oil MONOGRAM was. And it might be the best for Bit which happens to be nearby me. I know that a hundred pound loader like the 400 will work for me and it would not be too powerful. One poster, said that their 60 pound loader was short on some BTU's on the really cold days. And unlike wood, coal heaters don't have the problem of creating creosote when you turn them way down. So I would rather have too large a heater than too small. Plus, my wife is from the Tropics, so she enjoys cranking it up to 80 degrees in the winter, sometimes. The model 400 would be enough and I probably can't find the 200 pound loader(524) anyway. I am only interested in the 524 because it should last even longer between fillings since it holds 200 pounds. I can always turn it way down if it got too hot.

You may be right that Warm Morning always had the correct number of flues per unit. I just thought I remember an ad bragging in the "new improved version with the 4 flues". I am not a Physicist, but it seems counter intuitive that the largest Warm Morning(200 pound load model 524) would be more efficient with less flues than the smaller Warm Morning models. But what do I know? I already exposed how I learned some humility the hard way.

Smokey

A good story. Since I am originally down from them thar hills. It can get pretty darn cold. In fact Knoxville TN had the coldest temps in the nation in January of 1985. It got to minus 24 on my birthday. I have been familiar with Warm Mornings since childhood and they are specially made to burn soft coal exceptionally well. A great stove for a good price. They should still be fairly common back home in Tennessee. At least now you know better.


















orning is under appreciated like the Chubby was
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Stephen in Soky On: Tue Apr 27, 2010 1:35 pm

If you want a 200 pounder, start asking around about the old general stores, feed mills, hatcheries, local farrowing houses, sewing factories, dance halls, you know, big commercial/agricultural spaces. Down here (And I'm a little north of you) a 400 was considered a powerhouse for home heating. Anything larger would have been much more likely used commercially than in the home.
Stephen in Soky
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warm Morning
Stove/Furnace Model: 500

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Smokey On: Tue Apr 27, 2010 3:11 pm

Thanks Stephen n Sokey,

That pretty well settles the size issue. I surrender. I'll narrow my search to the 100 pound loaders like the model 400 and a few others. I'll just consider the model 524B 200 pound loader as a kind of novelty. I won't even think about it again unless I want to start a circus.

Speaking of others, even though the 100 pound loader like the model 400 would be the one to look for, if I can't find that then there are a few other 100 pound loaders that have narrower bodies and the jacket is designed differently. Anyone know if the skinnier 100 pound loaders give out the same amount of heat as the fatter 100 pound loaders like the 400? I'm not talking about the model 520's because I was already told that those give out the same amount of heat.

If I can find a 400, was there a BEST YEARS of build for the model 400's, kind of like best years for a certain model of car?
Smokey
 

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: envisage On: Tue Apr 27, 2010 3:35 pm

Hey Smokey, thanks a bunch for sharing that story. I am now reminded of all the research I did before getting my Warm Morning. Me needs to find some bit to play wit! :-)
envisage
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Werner Foundry 350a
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Warm Morning 400, Fire Boss Wood/Coal Hyrbrid
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat, Pea, Chestnut and Stove

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Stephen in Soky On: Tue Apr 27, 2010 7:40 pm

Smokey, Come to think of it, there was a person trying hard to get rid of a 400 on Nashville's Craigslist back a couple months ago. I'm not sure how long they keep the posts, but search for "Coal" & it may come up. If not, try a want to buy add on there. IIRC, the photos looked darned good.

ETA: They seem to come up on Knoxville Craigslist fairly often as well. Or, just use Search Tempest and cover the whole area: http://www.searchtempest.com/
Stephen in Soky
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warm Morning
Stove/Furnace Model: 500

Re: Best Warm Morning for Burning Bit.

PostBy: Smokey On: Tue Apr 27, 2010 11:39 pm

Thanks Stephen n sokey for the craigslist heads up. Glad you liked the story. Glad I wasn't around for that minus 24 degree weather on your Birthday. Speaking of cold temperatures where you wouldn't expect them, I'm reminded of the famous quote from Robert Frost where he said: "The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco"

Envisage. Must feel good to already have a 400 in the bag and being king of the hill again. Maybe I'm wasting my time looking for dates on the Warm Mornings. Please tell me if you find any date written on your 400. What year was your 400 made?
Smokey