Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: rt42 On: Tue Aug 17, 2010 6:04 pm

Hello all,
I just recently bought myself a mobile home and it has a fireplace. It also has forced warm air electric heat. I am thinking that might be a tad expensive to heat with. Now my thought was to put a fireplace insert, probably a Hitzer 503, and use that to heat my home. The total area is just under 1000 square feet. The first question is, is this legal to do by code? I live in the great state of Massachusetts, where we like to have our own special rules for everything. :D Second question is, will this overheat the house? As in, even on low it will still be 95 degrees in the house. I have been reading up on it, and it seems that you can adjust this insert to burn really low. That wouldn't cause any other problems would it? Thanks for the help.
rt42
 

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: franco b On: Tue Aug 17, 2010 6:17 pm

I think you will need a stove specifically approved for use in a mobile home. These usually have a fitting to duct outside combustion air. Your fireplace chimney also might not be approved. Talk to your local building inspector before buying anything.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Tue Aug 17, 2010 8:57 pm

franco b wrote:I think you will need a stove specifically approved for use in a mobile home. These usually have a fitting to duct outside combustion air. Your fireplace chimney also might not be approved. Talk to your local building inspector before buying anything.


My brother put a stand alone wood burning stove in his mobile home and he had to put in a Class A chimney. Does your existing fire place have a Class A chimney? An insert is going to radiant a lot of heat out the sides and back, can your fireplace take that? What does the manufacturer say? Franco B is right - you will have to get a fire place insert or stove that is approved for use in a mobile home. That's important for your home owner's insurance. I have never seen an insert that is approved for a mobile home but there are a couple of stove companies that have stoves which are approved for a mobile homes. That's doesn't mean such an insert doesn't exist, I've just never seen one; of course I wasn't looking either. If you can't find one you may want to consider getting an appropriate sized stand alone stove and running the Class A chimney up the existing chimney. If your fireplace opening and surrounding area is non flammable, i.e. rock or tile, that will reduce your "distance to combustibles" which will reduce how far the stove extends into your room. You could further reduce that feeling of intrusion by using a pre-constructed hearth board to extend the hearth. They sit right on the floor and sort of blend in.

Check out these postings on coal stoves in mobile homes:

Coal stove in a mobile home??

whitch size

It can be done and you will be surprised at the heat it puts out.
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

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Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Tue Aug 17, 2010 9:11 pm

The Leisure Line Hearth model, while not an insert, sits right in front of the fireplace and is approved for use in mobile homes.

http://www.leisurelinestoves.com/
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: CapeCoaler On: Tue Aug 17, 2010 9:36 pm

Do you have the install information...
That would describe the type of 'fireplace' and chimney you have...
Then ask the Mfg. if you can install a coal insert in it...
There is several zero clearance enclosures rated for wood burning inserts...
So if you are lucky it may be possible...
But the insert must be rated for mobile home use...
Per Hitzer website...
Under documents...
http://www.hitzer.com/products/stove/Model-503-E_Z-Flo-Hopper-Fireplace-Insert/
Install only in a factory built fireplace that is listed per UL 127 (US) or ULC S610 (CANADA) and is approved for insert installations.
CapeCoaler
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: rt42 On: Wed Aug 18, 2010 5:04 pm

Hello all,
Thanks for all the help. I have not heard of Leisure Line before. I will have to look into them and see if there are any dealers around here. Next questions what is a Class A chimney? I know mine is metal, probably means it is stainless but I am not sure what a Class A chimney is. My fireplace is surrounded by what I believe is a non combustible. It looks like thick concrete board with a rock veneer on it with a rock hearth that extends out in front of it. I was hoping for an insert just because it would look more finished but I don't think a free standing model would offend me that badly. With a free standing stove, generally speaking, with the size of my house would it be better to go with a hand fired or a stoker? I guess the real question is, how low can they go and still remain efficient and effective. What kind of information am I looking for as regards to the fireplace install? I have some paperwork that came with the house but I am not sure what it all means. Thanks again everyone for the help.
rt42
 

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Wed Aug 18, 2010 7:40 pm

rt42 wrote:Hello all,
Thanks for all the help. I have not heard of Leisure Line before. I will have to look into them and see if there are any dealers around here. Next questions what is a Class A chimney? I know mine is metal, probably means it is stainless but I am not sure what a Class A chimney is. My fireplace is surrounded by what I believe is a non combustible. It looks like thick concrete board with a rock veneer on it with a rock hearth that extends out in front of it. I was hoping for an insert just because it would look more finished but I don't think a free standing model would offend me that badly. With a free standing stove, generally speaking, with the size of my house would it be better to go with a hand fired or a stoker? I guess the real question is, how low can they go and still remain efficient and effective. What kind of information am I looking for as regards to the fireplace install? I have some paperwork that came with the house but I am not sure what it all means. Thanks again everyone for the help.


This is a link to a site the explains what a Class A chimney is.

http://hartshearth.com/chimney/chimneys.htm

Check out this posting I did early this summer. It explains the piping of a fire place insert using an existing chimney. It would be the same if you were hooking up a stand alone stove placed in front of the fireplace except the stove chimney connector pipe will be longer. Have you been able to determine what your existing chimney is constructed out of? If its tile or brick/block and meets local code you shouldn't need a Class A chimney. In that case you'd just do what's outlined in the posting on installing an stove insert. If it looks like it is a stainless steel tube with a thimble (a joint where the horizontal stove chimney connector pipe joins the vertical chimney) you may already have a Class A chimney. If so, confirm that with the County Office of Code compliance. Hopefully, someone pulled the permit. Once you determine what kind of chimney setup you have you can decide what you need to do to put a stove of some kind there. Just make sure whatever you get is approved for a mobile home. Can you send pictures? We like pictures.

pipe configuration of a fireplace insert

The decision of hand fed vs stoker depends on how much time and effort you want to spend on operating the stove. A hand fed will require tending morning and night while a stoker can run for several days with little or no attention. The heat output will be the same. A stoker will be bigger because of the hopper. Stoker also tend to be cleaner since you don't open the door for loading the coal. Good luck, Lisa
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: cabinover On: Thu Aug 19, 2010 6:31 am

Before even calling your local building inspector I'd make a few calls to insurance agencies, starting with yours. When I wanted to put a pellet stove in my double wide (which doesn't have a fireplace) I was told they would drop my insurance, didn't matter if I had a masonry chimney, or if the stove was approved for mobile home use.

The only thing that would have allowed me to use a solid fuel appliance is if it was installed into an addition. No size, or anything else to describe the addition so I guess a 6'X6' addition would suffice but would look really stupid.
cabinover
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Hybrid Axeman Anderson 130
Baseburners & Antiques: Sparkle #12
Coal Size/Type: Pea, Buckwheat, Nut
Other Heating: LP Hot air. WA TX for coal use.

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Thu Aug 19, 2010 8:34 am

pgfireplaces wrote:Hi I just read your post.I have not much experience about fireplace insert but I think wood burning stoves stoves are more effective.wood burning stove is often used for heating rooms or cooking food. Different types of wood stoves are used for different purposes as per the user's requirements. Wood stoves are primarily made up of iron or other kinds of metals and use wood as their main source of bio-fuel.


From looking at your links and your chosen "name" I can see why you'd feel that wood burning stoves are more effective but you are going to get an argument from the majority of members here. Wood burning stoves do have their place in this world but overall they are not more effective or efficient. In my opinion, wood stoves come in a distance second behind coal for home heating, domestic hot water production (can wood stoves even produce domestic hot water) or cooking. The primary reason folks go with wood over coal is the lack of availability and lack of knowledge of coal - if you can't get coal cheaper then you can get wood then go with wood but if a reliable source of coal is readily available informed, knowledgeable folks tend to go with coal; even if the wood is "free." In fact, a favorite saying on the forum is "sell the wood and buy coal with the money."

First off there is no "free wood." You pay for that wood with your labor; it has to be cut, stacked, and moved at least 3 times before it ever gets into the stove. With coal that labor and the amount of movement is reduced. Even if you buy wood already in cords, to produce the same BTUs, coal is still less expensive to buy and you can have it put right into your coal bin. It doesn't attract bugs and other vermin like wood does. Coal is easy to store outside, too, because it doesn't attract vermin and will burn wet. The only reason you have to cover coal is insure it doesn't freeze into a solid mass; one blow of a big hammer takes care of that. Coal is also considerably cleaner to use then wood both in the actual burning and area surrounding the stove. Coal doesn't create creosote so there is no fear of a chimney fire and it doesn't leave a trail of bits and pieces between the stove and the door. All these are true and valid reasons to use coal over wood but the biggest factor is BTU production. Coal wins hands down. It also doesn't require constant tending. I can load my coal stove and forget about it for 15 hours or more. You can't say that about a wood stove.

No, I'm sorry but your belief that wood stoves are more effective then coal stoves is wrong and won't stand up in a side by side comparison. Wood stoves have a place but they aren't more effective or user friendly than coal. I hope you have a good day, Lisa
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: rt42 On: Thu Aug 19, 2010 6:27 pm

Hello all,
Thanks again for all the help. I am including a picture of the fireplace and the outside portion of the chimney. It looks like it is a metal chimney 8" in diameter. I am not sure if it is considered a Class A or not though. I have done some more investigating, and from what I can see there are no hand fed stoves, free standing or insert, approved for mobile homes. However, free standing stokers generally speaking are. I know Harman makes one and so does Leisure Line. They usually also have some special requirements too, like outside combustion air and it has to be grounded to the metal frame of the house. I guess it comes down to is, do you think my existing chimney will work for a free standing stoker? Or am I going to have to either replace/reline the chimney or go for a power venter out the side? Thanks again for all the help everyone.
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rt42
 

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Thu Aug 19, 2010 8:17 pm

Hey check this out

http://www.mygreathome.com/fix-it_guide/woodstove.htm Found this while surfing the web. It's about a wood stove installation but in my county it's the same for coal as long as the stove is approved for use in a mobile home. Some one at the county inspector office should be able to tell you that the fireplace met code; they had to inspect it for the occupancy permit. Or you can have a chimney guy out and he can tell you. Anyway, I hope this helps. Lisa
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: rt42 On: Wed Aug 25, 2010 7:37 pm

Hello All,
Thanks again for all the tips and advice. I have been doing some more research and have come up with another idea. I have looked into pellet stove inserts which are approved for a mobile home. They seem to have a lower BTU rating than most coal inserts which is my guess for they are approved. They seem to be around 32K BTUs, which according to some charts for my heating zone would be enough for around 900 sq ft. Any opinions on this? I am still leaning towards getting a free standing coal stoker but just wondered if anyone out there had any opinions on this. Thanks again.
rt42
 

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Wed Aug 25, 2010 9:01 pm

I don't think you are going to be happy with a pellet stove. There are reasons you don't see coal burners jumping at the chance to use pellets. Pellets are more expensive then coal for the same BTU creation; it takes more pounds of pellets to heat your house to the desired temperature then it takes using coal. Pellets must be stored under cover and can't burn wet; if it does get wet it dissolves in a mass of wood waste particles. Unless you have a large indoor storage area you will be reluctant to buy pellets for the long term. Pellets are often unavailable when you need them due to problems in the supply chain. Coal burns wet so it doesn't matter how it's stored. Pellets attract vermin and insects. Coal doesn't. The list of coal positives goes on and on. I encourage you to prepare a side by side comparison of the plus and minuses of the two fuels. Go with the one that you feel has the fewer drawbacks. Good luck, Lisa
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: wsherrick On: Thu Aug 26, 2010 11:21 am

Do yourself a BIG favor and listen to Lisa. Buying a Pellet Stove is big mistake! You'll regret it if you do. Pellets are nothing but sawdust and wax made into little balls. They cost a whole lot more per BTU than coal does and as has been said the supply is very iffy. Pellet stoves are a trendy thing which will run it course in due time. Don't buy an Edsel.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Fireplace Insert in a Mobile Home

PostBy: rt42 On: Thu Aug 26, 2010 4:20 pm

Those were the thoughts I was thinking. Although I did not know that pellets attract rodents. That is good to know. The only reason I thought of it is because I do have a small home and that I might not need a all the heat of a coal stove. I have seen last year where people were trying to get pellets in the winter and they just were not available around here. And I looked at the prices of pellets around here as well. The good ones seem to be quite expensive. Thanks for input everyone.
rt42
 

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