Insulated vs. Non-Insulated Stoker Furnaces

Insulated vs. Non-Insulated Stoker Furnaces

PostBy: szembek On: Mon Jun 04, 2007 2:53 pm

I'm closing in on my decision for a coal burner, and I've pretty much decided on installing one of the following warm air furnaces:
http://www.keystoker.com/koker120.html
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.
(A120 or Koker). I think I like the non-insulated Koker a little bit more, but was looking for any experience some of you may have with either of these furnaces. I like the idea of having a central 'hot-spot' in the basement for drying wet boots, gloves, etc... plus the glass window is nice. Also the Koker has a much larger hopper, and costs a small amount less. Thanks for any advice you can offer.
szembek
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: A120

PostBy: MrP57 On: Mon Jun 04, 2007 7:24 pm

I bought a Koker and had my first fire 12-2-06. Mine is in the bacement. Hooked into the cold air return and there is a fan in our gas furnace that is always on low. The bacement stayed 70*, the rest of the house stayed 68\69*. Our living room is right above the Koker, we have wood floors there. The floors were always sooo nice and warm, it was the most comfortable heat we have ever had, love it. We got a couple racks for drying cloths, in the bacement, saved $20/30 a month on elect. I am thinking about installing a water coil in the Koker this sumer to help heat the water when the stove is running. The glass is too much of a pain to keep clean, did it once, I don't mine not seing the fire. That's my 2 cents.
Gary
MrP57
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystroker
Stove/Furnace Model: Koker

PostBy: Richard S. On: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:13 am

A lot of people run the larger furnaces year round, hence the need for insulation. You obviously don't want it pumping heat into the basement in the summer. :wink: You still get some amount of heat in the winter even with the insulation. You could just take a panels off if you wanted, it won't have that finished look though.

If you have a hot water jacket that more than offsets the cost, plus it will add many years to the lifetime of the unit.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Visit Lehigh Anthracite

PostBy: Richard S. On: Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:19 am

Unrelated Comment regarding spellcheck moved here:

http://nepacrossroads.com/viewtopic.php?t=1762
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

PostBy: szembek On: Tue Jun 05, 2007 8:21 am

I see what your saying about not overheating the basement in warmer weather, that's a valid point. The cost difference is very small, I think the koker is only like $200 less, not really significant with this kind of purchase. I wish the A120 had a bigger hopper, the non-insulated koker has a 240lb hopper compared to the A120's 140. Not a huge deal, but the bigger the better as far as hoppers are concerned. Do they make larger hoppers that can be added on to these systems down the road if I see the need?
szembek
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: A120

PostBy: Richard S. On: Tue Jun 05, 2007 2:15 pm

I don't know for sure but the size of the hopper is probably limited by the design of the furnace. To make it bigger you can only go up which would most like require a stepping stool or ladder. You could just add some plywood providing the mounts for the hopper are strong enough.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Visit Lehigh Anthracite