Anthracite Ash

PostBy: rt42 On: Sun Sep 16, 2007 9:27 am

That was what I was thinking. And if it filled up I could wait until it was cold and then store it in trash bags. Thanks for the help everybody.
rt42
 

PostBy: JerseyCoal On: Sun Sep 16, 2007 4:38 pm

IF it filled up???? You can count on that! I only have a small hand fired stove and I fill up the can once a week during cold spells.
JerseyCoal
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Franco Belge model 10.1475

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:02 pm

Yeah, not a very big if. :)
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea


Re: Anthracite Ash

PostBy: lzaharis On: Sun Sep 16, 2007 6:58 pm

totouchantler wrote:I have a mound of Anthracite ash out back of my house.........can I use it to fertilize mulch beds and shrubs? Or is it bad for them.
Chris


I would hold off on that as the ash has a lot of heavy metals and it will leach into the ground. My two cents.
lzaharis
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Switzer
Stove/Furnace Model: CWW100 100,000 btu

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Sun Sep 16, 2007 7:57 pm

Here are three commercial products that use coal fly ash in fertilizers.

http://www.undeerc.org/carrc/BuyersGuid ... p?catid=27

Some plants do very well with it, some very poorly. Especially when overdosed.
If you use it, do some research before hand on the plants. Coal ash is like lime. Just use the ash, no clinkers or coal. And don't overdo it, you will have a concrete garden in a few years if you do. :)
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

PostBy: gaw On: Sun Sep 16, 2007 8:31 pm

Living on a 100+ year old farm I have unearthed many things. I think they buried everything they didn't want anymore. Broken glass, china, tools, buckets, nails, etc. Among the things hiding under the lawn are deposits of coal ash. It is a total surprise when I dig into ash because there is no visible sign by looking at the grass that it is growing on top of coal ash.
gaw
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice from Schuylkill County

PostBy: Berlin On: Mon Sep 17, 2007 3:08 am

"I would hold off on that as the ash has a lot of heavy metals and it will leach into the ground"

stop with the misinformation. it is generally only slightly more concentrated than the soil in general. what, exactly do you think the dirt that you stand on contains?
Berlin
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal

PostBy: JerseyCoal On: Wed Sep 26, 2007 12:57 am

Hi all:

When I had my first home built in a development in 1981, the builder went bankrupt in the middle of the job; my wife and I waited 18 months for that home to be completed. For about three years there was an unoccupied building lot right across the street from me; a real convenient place for me to dump my coal ash.

When a home was finally constructed on the empty lot, the homeowner did a lot of landscaping, including a few white pine trees on the spot I dumped my ashes. The trouble was, the pine trees kept on dying, and the fellow kept on replacing them, and they kept on dying .... Years later, I made the mental connection but, by then, the homeowner had given up on the pine trees. I never had the heart to tell him about the coal ashes. That's just one more thing to add to the list of reasons why I'm going to Hell!
JerseyCoal
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Franco Belge model 10.1475

Jersey Coal, don't feel bad.....

PostBy: drujinin On: Thu Sep 27, 2007 1:19 pm

First off, buying good rooted pine trees is hard and second they require alot of proper care to keep them from dying for the first 10 years!
Don't worry it MAY NOT have been the Ash that killed them!
drujinin
drujinin
 

PostBy: JerseyCoal On: Thu Sep 27, 2007 9:41 pm

Thank you for your kind words; I feel much better. On Judgment Day I'll be sure to raise these facts as an affirmative defense.
JerseyCoal
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Franco Belge model 10.1475

Re: Anthracite Ash

PostBy: ron54 On: Fri Sep 28, 2007 7:03 am

totouchantler wrote:I have a mound of Anthracite ash out back of my house.........can I use it to fertilize mulch beds and shrubs? Or is it bad for them.
Chris


Nothing will ever grow there again. Coal ash is high in acid.
ron54
 

PostBy: LsFarm On: Fri Sep 28, 2007 8:03 am

I have grass and weeds sprouting from my ash pile. I do use most of the accumulated ash to patch holes in farm roads. They pack down and solidify nicely.

Everything in nature goes back to dirt, the worms eat it, plants grow in it, then we eventually eat it too.

My ash pile after two years [what I didn't use on the roads] was lost in the weeds, it had 'decomposed' down to what looked like a sand/dirt mix. This pile was about 1 cubic yard. Covered in grass and weeds.

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

PostBy: Yanche On: Fri Sep 28, 2007 9:20 am

Same here. I've got two years of ash in a pile. Plenty of weeds, some with nice flowers and even a small tree. Next year it will all be used as sand replacement in a concrete mix. Interestingly my cat doesn't like it for a litter box.
Yanche
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea

Acidity Soil

PostBy: drujinin On: Fri Sep 28, 2007 9:49 am

Pine trees LOVE acidity soil!! Ever notice that grass won't grow real well under them? Do some research and I think you'll find I am right. I plant a lot of pines from bare root stock to 6 footers that are being moved. Pines are hardy true but they are very hard to get going and keep going until they develop a good root system on their own.
drujinin
 

Coal Ash

PostBy: davebehrens On: Sun Sep 30, 2007 11:37 am

I layer coal ash in winter and garden trimmings in summer in low areas in my back yard. So far, no problems. BTW, I have a lot of it under pine trees, and they are doing great.

I use it occasionally instead of salt for my driveway and walks. It washes away in the spring.

My garbage man won't take the ash. Fussy guy.
davebehrens