Is direct-vent exaust clean?

Is direct-vent exaust clean?

PostBy: MaryFranky On: Sat Jul 07, 2007 9:51 pm

Hi guys. I'm from Quebec in Canada and I'm looking to get an automatic stove like the Keystone Stove 90. The vent would be on the side wall and this wall is made of acrylic (like stuco). I would like to know if this may affect the color of the wall?
MaryFranky
 

PostBy: cheapheat On: Sat Jul 07, 2007 10:47 pm

My Alaska Channing 3came with a really nice stainless double wall exhaust vent that I was very happy with after installation. But now after 2 years of burning coal several square feet of my siding (painted wood ship lap) is discolored some. I havent tried to clean it yet.... Jim
cheapheat
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska Channing 3
Stove/Furnace Model: Bagging my own rice coal

PostBy: LsFarm On: Sun Jul 08, 2007 9:09 am

If you install a shield on the siding around the vent, say about 16" square, then most if not all of the staining would be eliminated. There is not much other than fly ash [dust] in the exhaust gasses. Maybe the small amount of sulphur could react with paint or the 'stucco'. ?

Greg L

.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

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PostBy: Jerry & Karen On: Sun Jul 08, 2007 11:55 am

Hi Mary,
If you have everything set properly, barometric damper and power vent rheostat you shouldn't have a problem. The mix of the exaust with the barometric air and the louvers directing the gases away from your siding should help. One thing for sure, the acidity from the fly ash will kill any bushes directly under the vent.
Jerry LLS
Jerry & Karen
 

PostBy: coal_kid On: Mon Jul 09, 2007 8:23 pm

With the money you'll save, you'll be able to hire someone to re-paint your entire house.
coal_kid
 

PostBy: Richard S. On: Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:47 am

coal_kid wrote:With the money you'll save, you'll be able to hire someone to re-paint your entire house.


:lol: ... Good point, maybe not so much in Canada but still true .
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

PostBy: europachris On: Tue Jul 10, 2007 7:55 am

Leisure Line wrote:One thing for sure, the acidity from the fly ash will kill any bushes directly under the vent.
Jerry LLS


Oh-oh. That's not good. I don't think the wife is going to be happy when I kill the bushes under the vent this winter after I get our stove installed. Might have to run the vent up the side of the house several feet before I direct it outward.

Or maybe I could just trim them well back in the fall and cover with some burlap?

The wife already takes a dim view on this entire coal project, and I don't need that as added fuel to the fire. Hopefully she'll appreciate the toasty warm basement and lower gas bills this winter.....

chris
europachris
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM 350/Iron Fireman
Stove/Furnace Model: Custom bituminous burner

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Tue Jul 10, 2007 10:03 am

europachris wrote:Or maybe I could just trim them well back in the fall and cover with some burlap?

The wife already takes a dim view on this entire coal project, and I don't need that as added fuel to the fire. Hopefully she'll appreciate the toasty warm basement and lower gas bills this winter..... chris


They will still die, get a chimney. You won't enjoy it if the wife doesn't.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

PostBy: Yanche On: Tue Jul 10, 2007 10:56 am

The combustion of coal produces sulfur dioxide. It's a result of the burning of the sulfur present in the coal combining with the oxygen in the air. When the flue gases are directed outside your home the sulfur dioxide will have an effect on the immediate environment. How much of an effect depends on many factors. Proximity is the greatest factor. Sulfur dioxide has a bleaching effect on many objects. Sulfur dioxide contributes to the formation of acid rain, which damages trees, crops and certain building materials. It also make soils, lakes and streams acidic. Generally a chimney provides enough distance between its outlet and any building materials it could damage. The small amount of sulfur dioxide in the flue gases mix with the surrounding air and cause no harm. For direct vent coal appliances the effects of are less predictable. It all depends on how quickly the sulfur dioxide can mix with and be carried away by the hopefully moving air. Plants directly under a direct vent will be damaged. Building materials in close proximity can be bleached. If the direct vent exits where the surrounding air is frequently stagnant the effects will be greater. Be sure to follow the specific building code recommendations for location of the vents. In general you must stay away from doors or windows which could allow the combustion products to re-enter the building.

Now, all that being said do not hesitate to burn coal. A properly installed stove or central heating system will provide very good economical heat. How economical will depend on your local coal cost. Convince the wife first.
Yanche
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea

PostBy: europachris On: Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:09 pm

coaledsweat wrote:They will still die, get a chimney. You won't enjoy it if the wife doesn't.


Unfortunately not possible due to location of the stove. It has to be a direct vent. However, if I run the direct vent pipe (I'll be using PelletPro pipe, 4" size) up the wall about 3' from where it exits and then terminate, the exhaust will be up high enough from the surrounding area to not be a big issue.

I'd LOVE to put in a real chimney, but with the design of our house, there is no way to go through two floors without hitting something, and every outside wall has a door or window in the way.

Chris
europachris
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM 350/Iron Fireman
Stove/Furnace Model: Custom bituminous burner

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