Coal Bin Plans

Coal Bin Plans

PostBy: BillK On: Thu Jul 12, 2007 7:37 pm

This is my 2nd winter with my keystoker. Last year was a hastle with running to the coal distributor in Scranton and unloading my pick-up 5 gallons at a time. I need help with coal bin plans this year. I can't seem to find any on the internet.

Bill
BillK
 

PostBy: Richard S. On: Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:51 am

Welcome to the forum Bill, where do you want to put your bin? Inside or outside? How many ton do you want it to hold?

There's all kinds of ways to do it depending on the material you want to use, space avaialable etc. . My two big suggestions concern making sure you have easy access. If for example you build it outside make the roof removeable, on hinges etc. As long as you can prop it up somehow is fine. Build a access door with slats like a guillotine on the side of the bin, as the coal is removed from the top of the bin you remove the slats one by one. Once you get them low enough you can go right into the bin to get to the coal that is not acessible instead of climbing over the top.

I just put a knowledge base online and I have been meaning to make up some basic plans for the last century now, maybe I'll get to it one of these days.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

PostBy: Rex On: Fri Jul 13, 2007 6:38 am

Rex
 
Stove/Furnace Make: D.S. Machine
Stove/Furnace Model: Circulator 1500


PostBy: BillK On: Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:19 am

I would like to place the coal bin on a concrete patio located at the end of my driveway allowing ease of delivery. I have been told by my local stove dealer 4X4X8 bin will hold 2 tons of rice coal? Last year I used just over 2 tons for the entire season. Thanks for the link.
BillK
 

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:30 am

I think a ton is about 40 cubic feet, so that is around 3.2 tons?
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

PostBy: BillK On: Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:44 am

Great!!, 4 X 4 X 8 is just what the doctor ordered. I am using 2 old army tent crates with an oversized ratchet strap holding the sides from busting out. This was great for last year but with mama staying home with a new born I'll need to make something more perminate and user friendly. I wanted to use 3/4" plywood 4 x 4" base and 2 X 6" frame. I can't believe there are no plans for a coal bin on the internet.
BillK
 

PostBy: Richard S. On: Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:46 am

coaledsweat wrote:I think a ton is about 40 cubic feet, so that is around 3.2 tons?


Correct, 3 tons usually tops it off nicely. Keep in mind it varies slightly depending on the size and even the coal. The stove dealer should be qualifying that because people will be thinking they are getting ripped off.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

PostBy: Richard S. On: Fri Jul 13, 2007 7:52 am

BillK wrote: I can't believe there are no plans for a coal bin on the internet.


The only place they would be is here, hence the reason you can't find them. There's really no other forum or information except maybe at http://www.hearth.com but they deal mostly with wood.


Basically you just build a box, the access door I mentioned and making sure there is access to the top is whats important. You need access to the top if you want to get it delivered.

Besides that building it sturdy enough, 3/4 is preferable. Those ratchet straps can come in handy, put eyebolts on the inside of the bin in the center on each side. then use the ratchet strap to keep it from bowing out. The reason for the ratchet straps is once you get the coal out you can take the straps out and they won't be in your way.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

PostBy: ktm rider On: Fri Jul 13, 2007 10:51 am

I have my boiler out in my detached garge and I just put down a full sheet of 1/2" plywood and then I used cinderblocks around it and then another sheet of plywood for the top .
I get my coal with my dump trailer . SO, I pull the dumper into the garage and just dump it into the bin.
it works great because in the spring I just take it apart and it doesn't take up space in the garage in the summer time....
ktm rider
 
Stove/Furnace Make: AHS Multifuel
Stove/Furnace Model: CO 55 with oil backup

PostBy: WNY On: Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:16 pm

Another link, I put dim's and sizes/Capacities

http://nepacrossroads.com/viewtopic.php?t=1505
WNY
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90K, Leisure Line Hyfire I
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, LL & CoalTrol
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Hyfire I, VF3000 Soon

PostBy: gambler On: Sat Jul 14, 2007 9:54 am

ktm rider wrote:I have my boiler out in my detached garge and I just put down a full sheet of 1/2" plywood and then I used cinderblocks around it and then another sheet of plywood for the top .
I get my coal with my dump trailer . SO, I pull the dumper into the garage and just dump it into the bin.
it works great because in the spring I just take it apart and it doesn't take up space in the garage in the summer time....


KTM, how do you keep the blocks in place with the pressure from the coal pushing outward? I was thinking of doing the same thing but figured I would need a way to keep the blocks from moving.
gambler
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer

PostBy: Yanche On: Sat Jul 14, 2007 12:27 pm

gambler wrote:KTM, how do you keep the blocks in place with the pressure from the coal pushing outward? I was thinking of doing the same thing but figured I would need a way to keep the blocks from moving.

I've got 12-inch wide hollow core blocks stacked three high on concrete with no push out problems. You could always use retaining wall blocks that interlock one course into the next for higher walls. However, they are considerably more expensive than standard block.
Yanche
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea

PostBy: ktm rider On: Sat Jul 14, 2007 2:25 pm

Yanche wrote:
gambler wrote:KTM, how do you keep the blocks in place with the pressure from the coal pushing outward? I was thinking of doing the same thing but figured I would need a way to keep the blocks from moving.

I've got 12-inch wide hollow core blocks stacked three high on concrete with no push out problems. You could always use retaining wall blocks that interlock one course into the next for higher walls. However, they are considerably more expensive than standard block.


Ditto,


I don't have any pushing problem. I only usually put 2 ton at the most in it though....
ktm rider
 
Stove/Furnace Make: AHS Multifuel
Stove/Furnace Model: CO 55 with oil backup

PostBy: gambler On: Sat Jul 14, 2007 10:13 pm

I would like to stack them 7 high and I can see push out being a problem. I will just have to go buy some wood for a bin wall which is too bad because I have a bunch of used,cleaned 10 inch block around.
gambler
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer

PostBy: ktm rider On: Sat Jul 14, 2007 10:53 pm

If the bin you are planning to build is goign to be permanent, why not just go buy a bag of motar?
ktm rider
 
Stove/Furnace Make: AHS Multifuel
Stove/Furnace Model: CO 55 with oil backup


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