Any experiences with coal in a wood insert not made for coal

Any experiences with coal in a wood insert not made for coal

PostBy: garybial On: Fri Nov 26, 2010 12:04 pm

Hello, Ive had a nagging question for some time and was wondering if anyone has done the following of what I'd liker to do so here goes: I have a wood burning insert (Osburn 2200) is there anyway to burn coal in it with either making a "fixture" for the coal or using it on an established wood fire bed? My goal is to have an overnight fire maintained and to help stretch the wood supply as I have to haul it from my source some distance. The fireplace does have a firebrick lining but has large glass doors, it has the secondary air to burn off gases. I don't want to damage my insert by experimenting and if this is not very practicable I will try a plan B with adding equipment elsewhere to my heating system. Thanks
Last edited by garybial on Fri Nov 26, 2010 12:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
garybial
 
Other Heating: Pellet stove
Stove/Furnace Make: Osburn 2200 Insert

Re: Any experiences with coal in a wood insert not made for coal

PostBy: AA130FIREMAN On: Fri Nov 26, 2010 12:26 pm

Do you have access to anthracite coal ? Coal needs air supply under the fire bed and a way to damper down the air supply.
AA130FIREMAN
 
Stove/Furnace Make: axeman anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: 130 anthratube

Re: Any experiences with coal in a wood insert not made for coal

PostBy: garybial On: Fri Nov 26, 2010 12:36 pm

I can get bagged coal, but haven't yet, and the stove does have a damper (draft). Anthracite is the route I though might work best.
garybial
 
Other Heating: Pellet stove
Stove/Furnace Make: Osburn 2200 Insert


Re: Any experiences with coal in a wood insert not made for coal

PostBy: AA130FIREMAN On: Fri Nov 26, 2010 1:02 pm

You would have to modify the insert with a damper below the fire and a shaker grade. Look at a stove like a harman sf250, they can burn either wood or coal (not rated to because of EPA regulations.) They have dampers above and below the fire and a shaker grate. This is not an insert, possably you could remove the insert and set one on the hearth using the existing chimney.
AA130FIREMAN
 
Stove/Furnace Make: axeman anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: 130 anthratube

Re: Any experiences with coal in a wood insert not made for coal

PostBy: CapeCoaler On: Sat Nov 27, 2010 2:03 pm

Hitzer 503...
http://www.hitzer.com/products/stove/Model-503-E_Z-Flo-Hopper-Fireplace-Insert/
The 'rents love it...
Copy the design or just buy a coal insert...
The hopper pulls out if you want to burn some wood...
But you want to run it as a coal stove...
Much less work... :D
CapeCoaler
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Re: Any experiences with coal in a wood insert not made for coal

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Sat Nov 27, 2010 6:10 pm

garybial wrote: I don't want to damage my insert by experimenting and if this is not very practicable I will try a plan B with adding equipment elsewhere to my heating system. Thanks


You are going to get very frustrated with trying to burn coal in an insert designed for burning wood. As the guys have told you a coal stove or insert needs a set of shakable grates to facilitate the removal of ash and a dedicated source of under fire draft. A coal fire burns from the bottom up and you control the heat production by how much air you allow to move through the coal bed. Yes, some stoves claim to burn either fuel but they mostly don't. You need to get the appliance designed for the fuel you plan to burn. If it were me I'd look for a coal stove which could be installed using the existing chimney or a coal burning insert which would set right in the fireplace. There are many types of coal appliances available that can either completely replace you current heating system or greatly reduce your heating bills as a supplemental heating source.

Having said that, I remember reading on the forum a posting from someone who placed a handful of coal on his wood fire prior to going to bed. In this way he was able to extend the length of burn of the wood fire. He apparently didn't care about keeping the coal burning but cleaned the ashes out and started over each night. That doesn't take advantage of the benefits of coal but it apparently fit his needs. Good luck, Lisa
lowfog01
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Mark II & Mark I

Re: Any experiences with coal in a wood insert not made for coal

PostBy: Josh H On: Wed Dec 08, 2010 9:59 pm

You CANNOT keep up with the ash generated by coal without a shaker grate and an ashpan as big as the firebox. I do encourage you to try it though, it won't hurt anything, you will just be frustrated when you have to let the fire burn out to deal with the ash.
lowfog01 wrote:You are going to get very frustrated with trying to burn coal in an insert designed for burning wood. As the guys have told you a coal stove or insert needs a set of shakable grates to facilitate the removal of ash and a dedicated source of under fire draft. A coal fire burns from the bottom up and you control the heat production by how much air you allow to move through the coal bed. Yes, some stoves claim
Josh H
 
Stove/Furnace Make: dutch west medium Hitzer 354
Stove/Furnace Model: Farm & Fleet style wood