Help identifying what coal I have

Help identifying what coal I have

PostBy: lobsterman On: Fri Jan 07, 2011 8:38 am

I got from the basement of an old house in Boston, a mix of coal briquets and stove/egg-size anthracite. The briquets look exactly like wood charcoal except they are bigger, maybe twice the size. They burn well in the mix and make a lot of dirty smelly smoke out the chimney. What is this stuff, is it coke? I have never seen coal processed into briquets before. Thanks in advance for your help.
lobsterman
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Base Heater No. 6

Re: Help identifying what coal I have

PostBy: lobsterman On: Fri Jan 07, 2011 9:04 am

I found this neat article from 1903 showing coal briquettes were in use in New England at that time. They are made from hard and soft coal dust with a binder. This must be what I have.
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-fr ... 5B838CF1D3
lobsterman
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Base Heater No. 6

Re: Help identifying what coal I have

PostBy: titleist1 On: Fri Jan 07, 2011 9:42 am

A few years back I came across something similar, it appeared to be coal dust formed into cylinders and wrapped in cellophane. The cylinders were about the size of two large soup cans laid end to end. They smelled a little like kerosene, but not too strong. We ended up with about 3/4 of a pallet of them. I would throw a few in with the wood or coal that I was burning at the time. They burned more like wood with a yellowish flame for a while but seemed to have a longer burn time. I haven't seen anything like them since.
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite


Re: Help identifying what coal I have

PostBy: wsherrick On: Fri Jan 07, 2011 2:09 pm

lobsterman wrote:I found this neat article from 1903 showing coal briquettes were in use in New England at that time. They are made from hard and soft coal dust with a binder. This must be what I have.
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-fr ... 5B838CF1D3


It seems like our Ancestors were even thinking about and experimenting with recycling and even making wood pellets. That's just one more thing we can give them credit for.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size