not doing so good :(

not doing so good :(

PostBy: Tnguy On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 11:04 am

cant seem to get a even fire that will last, ive adjusted the draft (over and under) till im blue in the face, i have a good hot fire and everything is going good, i have the draft set and all is good, then i go to bed at 11pm and by 5am the house is cool (74 at bed time and 65 in the am) there is a big pile of cola in there in the am still and its glowing but its just not putting out enough heat, if i shake it down then it fires up and does good, ive broken it to golf ball size and left in in softball size same end results,if i open the draft to get hotter fire going then when the blowers shut off it feels like the furnace is going to melt :( gets very hot, and i dont think thats right, anyway im lost again :(
Tnguy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: United States Stove company
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557M

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: freetown fred On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 11:11 am

Be patient my friend--people w/ more knowledge about bit & your stove will get you through this little set back ;)
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: Willis On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 11:13 am

First , dont get discouraged. With enough patience and info the great knowledge of our members here can get you through this. Can you please post a pic of your set up . I read in one of you posts that you furnace was outside. Give us pics and details, what size flue pipe, chimney, where and how do you have furnace plumbed into ducts. more info the better. Hang in there buddy. Willis
Willis
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Combustioneer 24 FA w/ Will-Burt s-30
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Combustioneer 77, Stokermatic
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Warm Morning 520,521
Coal Size/Type: Washed stoker- Bituminous


Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: Stephen in Soky On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 11:44 am

MPD or Barometric damper? FWIW I picked up a ton of egg size last fall thinking it would be so much easier to handle (And it was) but never again. Lumps, big lumps, are what gets me through the night. Our low this morning was 1.4 F yet the stove was still cranking pretty good & the house was only down to 70 after an 8 hour burn. With egg, I'm reloading almost as often as wood. Also, on the big lump I can't damper my exhaust down like with wood. Coal exhaust is cooler by nature and personally I need it flowing fairly fast to pull air up through the coal. Much faster than with wood. That's why I asked about MPD or Baro damper.
Stephen in Soky
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warm Morning
Stove/Furnace Model: 500

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: Tnguy On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 12:19 pm

Willis wrote:First , dont get discouraged. With enough patience and info the great knowledge of our members here can get you through this. Can you please post a pic of your set up . I read in one of you posts that you furnace was outside. Give us pics and details, what size flue pipe, chimney, where and how do you have furnace plumbed into ducts. more info the better. Hang in there buddy. Willis


yes my stove is outside in a tin shed, its a store bought furnace but a homemade hook up, i live in a double wide and cant hook to the register vents so i came through a spare bedroom window at the end of the house (so the air is blown/forced all down the house) all i have is a 6" chimney pipe (what stove calls for) and a isolated 6" duct pipe bringing the hot air into the house, the return air is outside air, i know this sounds jury rigged and it is BUT ive been burning wood like this for years (new stove this year but same set up) and its always worked fine. but this coal is giving me fits :( the thermostat in the house shut off the blowers this morning and about 1/2 hr latter the inside temp in the tin shed was over 200* the top of the stove above the firebox was way over 350* and it smells like the stove is burning up :( below are some pictures of what i got...

also the air coming out of the duct pipe in the house is over 250*

before install
Image

Image


fire with door open
Image

this is the top of the stove above the fire box, this is where the blower blows the air between the fire box and the tin outer cover the thermometer tip is at least 2 1/2 to 3" above the fire box and it went right over 350* in less than a minute, (the fan had just shut off at the time) PS the rusty pipe you see behind it is the hot air not chimney
Image
Tnguy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: United States Stove company
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557M

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: Tnguy On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 12:21 pm

Stephen in Soky wrote:MPD or Barometric damper? FWIW I picked up a ton of egg size last fall thinking it would be so much easier to handle (And it was) but never again. Lumps, big lumps, are what gets me through the night. Our low this morning was 1.4 F yet the stove was still cranking pretty good & the house was only down to 70 after an 8 hour burn. With egg, I'm reloading almost as often as wood. Also, on the big lump I can't damper my exhaust down like with wood. Coal exhaust is cooler by nature and personally I need it flowing fairly fast to pull air up through the coal. Much faster than with wood. That's why I asked about MPD or Baro damper.



i have a mpd BUT its wide open all the time because they(here) said to leave it open/get rid of it..

ive tried breaking this lup up and leaving it whole not much difference here :( thanks
Tnguy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: United States Stove company
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557M

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: oros35 On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 1:00 pm

What does your chimney look like, what's it made out of? Insulated pipe? Sounds like a draft issue to me.

I thought about doing something similar at my house with an outside room for the fire, but after looking into it, it was more complicated than I thought and just put the stove in the basement.
oros35
 
Baseburners & Antiques: 1912 Smith & Anthony Hub Heater #215
Stove/Furnace Make: Smith & Anthony Co.
Stove/Furnace Model: #215 Hub Heater

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: Tnguy On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 1:18 pm

oros35 wrote:What does your chimney look like, what's it made out of? Insulated pipe? Sounds like a draft issue to me.

I thought about doing something similar at my house with an outside room for the fire, but after looking into it, it was more complicated than I thought and just put the stove in the basement.



Its not insulated chimney pipe, the outside room worked great for years with the old stove and wood and worked great with wood with the new stove but the caol is getting the best of me :(

i would put a different kind of stove IN the house if the ins company wouldn't raise the rates so hi, or cancel me if i had a fire :(
Tnguy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: United States Stove company
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557M

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: Berlin On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 3:03 pm

sounds like a draft issue. I wouldn't doubt that your small pipe especially where the MPD is located is choked with soot. the mpd even being open will cause a surprising amount of soot to accumulate on it and the pipe where it is. Remove it entirely and BTW use an 8" chimney and you won't have to worry again. It doesn't matter what the stove "calls for"; the mfg'r doesn't know what they're doing. 8" flue makes all the difference in the world.
Berlin
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: rockwood On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 3:34 pm

How much coal are you loading at night?
rockwood
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Stokermatic coal furnace
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Rockwood Stoveworks Circulator
Baseburners & Antiques: Malleable/Monarch Range
Coal Size/Type: Soft coal: Lump and stoker (slack coal)

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: Tnguy On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:27 pm

Berlin wrote:sounds like a draft issue. I wouldn't doubt that your small pipe especially where the MPD is located is choked with soot. the mpd even being open will cause a surprising amount of soot to accumulate on it and the pipe where it is. Remove it entirely and BTW use an 8" chimney and you won't have to worry again. It doesn't matter what the stove "calls for"; the mfg'r doesn't know what they're doing. 8" flue makes all the difference in the world.



il see if i got any 8" laying around still. thanks
Tnguy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: United States Stove company
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557M

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: Tnguy On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:28 pm

rockwood wrote:How much coal are you loading at night?


well i dont know by weight how much but that pile in the picture is what i had in there last night, and its mounded up higher than the fire brick,
Tnguy
 
Stove/Furnace Make: United States Stove company
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557M

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: Freddy On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 6:05 pm

A Forum Member named Macdabs is having very similar issues. Here's a copy & paste of what I wrote for him:

I was reading through your posts and found one that mentioned the coal is Bituminous. Most of us here are burning Anthracite. Bit coal has a longer learning curve than Anthracite and personally, I have no idea how it's done! I do know that it's tricky and if not done right, it's very frustrating. "Done right" means not only done correctly, but done in a proper device. My gut it telling me that your boiler, while advertised to burn coal, isn't a great coal burner. Coal stoves burn coal. Wood stoves burn wood. You can usually burn wood in a coal stove, but most combination stoves (or boilers) are not all that great at burning coal. Add that to burning Bit, and I think therein lies a lot of the problem. That being said, I'm sure there are people here that can get you burning far better than you are now. In order to do that they will need some information, such as:

Good pictures of the boiler outside and more importantly, inside, the grates, the walls, the shape. A description of the dimensions of the firebox.
Description of the chimney, type, size, height.
Does it have a barometric damper?
Does it have a Manometer?
What controls the incoming air, and does the air come in over or under the coal? Or both?
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: paulfun On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 6:24 pm

The pic of the front of your stove tells the story for me! The hot blast is designed for burning wood, but will burn coal also. Problem here being that they dont tell you you need to install an additional fan to the front of the furnace to properly burn coal in it! I learned this while looking at a Hot Blast that was for sale at a very reduced rate and when I opened it and realised that it had been fired I asked "why it was returned?" The salesman then explained that without the fan to help it burn coal it was not going to burn it effectively! He told me he recomended the first buyer order and install the "Kit" as he called it but they thought it would do fine without it. about 2 weeks later they returned the stove saying it wouldnt burn right.

I would recomend you get in touch with the manufacturer and inquire about this Kit or fan as it sounds like it is a known problem when tryin to burn coal in that stove.

Sorry I dont have the specifics on it for you.
paulfun
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman/Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: magnum/koker

Re: not doing so good :(

PostBy: paulfun On: Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:01 pm

Ok a quick phone call got me some better info for you

Its called a forced air draft kit and needs to be installed in order to properly burn coal in the model 1557 and 1600 stove.

For the 1557 the part number for the kit is 11dikl
for the 1600 the part number is 16dikl

A quick search on the US stove web site shows both for just over $200.bucks

Hope this helps.
paulfun
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman/Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: magnum/koker