Pictures Of Your Boiler

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: Lightning On: Wed Dec 19, 2012 9:29 am

Rob R. wrote:I used to heat my house with a hand-fed boiler...I wouldn't considering going back to it even if I got the boiler for free and a $5,000 check just for the trouble. A stoker boiler is the only thing that will do the things you want without driving you out of the house.


Sounds like you love your stoker :D What about having the option to run other fuels like wood or bitty coal if a situation should arise? You don't think I could idle back a hand fed enough in the summer months?
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: Pacowy On: Wed Dec 19, 2012 9:45 am

Lightning wrote: Sounds like you love your stoker :D What about having the option to run other fuels like wood or bitty coal if a situation should arise? You don't think I could idle back a hand fed enough in the summer months?


You don't know the half of it. He's been dressing it up for years, but his wife still won't let him put it in the living room. :lol:

If you look in the EFM section, they have a pretty good record of being able to burn bit. Piece sizing is an issue, since the feed tube on the stoker EFM sells now is comparatively small, but that unit was certified as a biofuels burner and will run on pellets and all kinds of weird stuff. The bigger/older EFM's have bigger feed tubes. I have a test shipment of bit sitting in my front hall ( :shh: ) waiting to run through my DHW boiler when I get that going.

Mike
Pacowy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: H.B. Smith 350 Mills boiler/EFM 85R stoker
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/anthracite

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: Boots On: Wed Dec 19, 2012 7:28 pm

Here are a couple of pics of my old girl. She does me well. I picked her up for cheep on craigslist. Not much to look at but she keeps us warm! When i went to look at the Boiler the first time It was in excellent shape, it had originally been installed as a back up heat source and had only had wood burned in it a couple of times. And based on the lack of creosote build up I decided this must be true. We agreed on a price and that the seller would be responsible for removing the 1000 Lb boiler from his basement and placing it on his driveway. From there i was responsible for loading. The next day when i went to pick her up every corner of the sheet metal was bent, the pressure relief valve was damaged and it had dirt lodged in the Return water port to which my circulator pump now is attached. I was not happy but the it was still a good price even with the new damage, But I did not pay the full amount. The seller wanted me to load it right away and even tried to "help" me do this, I declined to load it immediately and suggested we re-negotiate the price before it was loaded. We settled on $250, $125 lower than the original price. If you are wondering just what in the world he did to do so much damage while moving it across his lawn, He decided that since it sank the wheels of his hand truck into his lawn that it was too hard to pull. So he drug it with his truck, over a sheet of plywood across his lawn. :bang:

Here is a link to the whole gallery of pics.
http://s1299.beta.photobucket.com/user/boots_1983/library/



Image Image
Boots
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Burnham SFB 101 (sold)

Visit Lehigh Anthracite

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: Boots On: Wed Dec 19, 2012 7:41 pm

Lightning wrote: would like a boiler to run year round

Will they operate in a power outage situation at all with just gravity circulation??



If you want to run it year round, you need a good draft, maybe a draft inducer for when it really warms up.

and yes, in a power failure you can open any zone valves in the system and let it gravity flow. This will put off some heat in the house but i think the biggest need to do this would be to ensure you do not over-temp. I have done this as an experiment with mine, I opened the zone valve and turned off the circulator that runs 24/7 to keep my oil boiler hot. I let it gravity flow for about 1 hour, the base boards throughout the house were warm, not hot, warm. and I only lost a few degrees of water temp in the boiler. My best estimate is that you will not freeze before the power comes back on. Plus you will get the radiant heat off of the boiler itself. My boiler room stays 80*f and the rest of the basement stays around 73*f. This heat will surely rise and help to keep the house more comfortable. Also If you have a natural draft unit with no fans, you could get enough power from a power inverter to run the system during power failure. In my case all i have is 2 circulators, and 2 24v transformers. that is probably less than 500 watts.
Boots
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Burnham SFB 101 (sold)

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: blrman07 On: Wed Dec 19, 2012 7:48 pm

Am I seeing that the discharge from the pressure relief valve is piped back into the boiler? :!:

Rev. Larry
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Baseburners & Antiques: rebuilding a 1906 March Brownback Double Heater, using a UMCO 1920's Pot Belly stove in the church
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: Dennis On: Wed Dec 19, 2012 8:12 pm

Lightning wrote:
Rob R. wrote:I used to heat my house with a hand-fed boiler...I wouldn't considering going back to it even if I got the boiler for free and a $5,000 check just for the trouble. A stoker boiler is the only thing that will do the things you want without driving you out of the house.


Sounds like you love your stoker :D What about having the option to run other fuels like wood or bitty coal if a situation should arise? You don't think I could idle back a hand fed enough in the summer months?


Boots wrote:If you want to run it year round, you need a good draft, maybe a draft inducer for when it really warms up.


I have a hand feed boiler and love it,but can't wait to get enough money to put a under feed stoker on it.I have no problems with draft untill around 70 degrees,can't even amanage trying to keep draft all summer.

Lightning wrote:Will they operate in a power outage situation at all with just gravity circulation?


Get a generator. I agree with Boots,the gravity feed only makes the radiators warm and not enough to remove the rising boiler temps and blowing the PRV.
When the elec. goes out and no generator, the difference between a boiler and furnace is a furnace can over fire with out much damage,but when a boiler over fires it will blow the PRV and loose it's water and without water make make up boiler will be damaged.
Dennis
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: AHS/WOC55-multi-fuel/wood,oil,coal
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/stove size

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: crazy4coal On: Wed Dec 19, 2012 8:25 pm

[quote="blrman07"]Am I seeing that the discharge from the pressure relief valve is piped back into the boiler? :!:

Yes, Some of the hand fired boilers are piped that way so if the valve opens it dumps water on the fire put it out. (old school safety). Makes a hella mess but better than kaboom! If I remember right EFM's have a plug that melts if the temps get to high and sprays water on the fire.
crazy4coal
 
Stove/Furnace Make: buderus
Stove/Furnace Model: logana

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: Boots On: Wed Dec 19, 2012 9:10 pm

blrman07 wrote:Am I seeing that the discharge from the pressure relief valve is piped back into the boiler? :!:

Rev. Larry


crazy4 coal beat me to it. it does plumb into the firebox. Burnham calls it an extinguishing valve. originally it was a 27 psi valve but i could not find one at any supply house i called so it got replaced with a 30 psi valve. there is another relief valve on the oppisite side that drains into the floor, plus my oil boiler has one as well. I guess over pressure is not something i have to worry about.
Boots
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Burnham SFB 101 (sold)

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: strez123 On: Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:30 am

I am posting these pics for someone I work with. Here are pictures of his new leisure line WL 110 .
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strez123
 
Stove/Furnace Make: keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: koker 105

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: Dennis On: Tue Dec 25, 2012 8:34 am

strez123 wrote:I am posting these pics for someone I work with. Here are pictures of his new leisure line WL 110 .

That's a nice small boiler with a small footprint and will fit into many smaller homes.Yes,I said it's small,but many people don't need a larger boiler.Oh,and forgot very affordable. :clap:
Dennis
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: AHS/WOC55-multi-fuel/wood,oil,coal
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/stove size

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: dalimama On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 3:55 am

Seeing that pic... would a boiler of that size be able to heat a 100 year old Victorian house with a basement and three floors, approx 1800 square feet?

Just curious. Our very old dynatherm is on it's last leg and we are limited as to what can go into our basement and how since the previous owners built a shoddy kitchen addition over the outside entrance to the basement (idiots). The heater guy who was at our house earlier today felt that a propane
boiler is all that would fit down our narrow basement steps without having to take out either a part of the floor or the steps themselves.

I'm also curious about options that could be placed outside, or even in a junk room off of my kitchen.

thanks for any and all input.

and, we will have to go with something new because we need to attain financing.
dalimama
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM
Stove/Furnace Model: 350

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: Lightning On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 5:10 am

dalimama wrote:and, we will have to go with something new because we need to attain financing.
I think if you are going all out then do what you gotta do to get a nice coal boiler into the basement. It would be the best place since any heat loss from it would help warm the floor above it. Once its done it shouldn't need to come out for a while (like 200 years or so :lol: ) and you will be happy with your arrangement 8-) Thats my opinion..
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: strez123 On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 8:46 am

A propane boiler would be the worst think you could put in for cost effectiveness. It takes 290 gallons on propane to make the same btu.s as one ton of coal. My friend who has the leisure line 110 bought it because his friend up the street has one running all of last year he never shut it down even threw the summer he kept it going for his domestic hot water the two of them are very pleased with their ll 110. My friend is heating an old 2 story about 2200 square feet, he likes also the extra heat he get in the basement now also from it. My personal opinion from what I seen of this boiler and the cost a lot of happy customers .
strez123
 
Stove/Furnace Make: keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: koker 105

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: Rob R. On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 8:56 am

dalimama wrote:Seeing that pic... would a boiler of that size be able to heat a 100 year old Victorian house with a basement and three floors, approx 1800 square feet?

Just curious. Our very old dynatherm is on it's last leg and we are limited as to what can go into our basement and how since the previous owners built a shoddy kitchen addition over the outside entrance to the basement (idiots). The heater guy who was at our house earlier today felt that a propane
boiler is all that would fit down our narrow basement steps without having to take out either a part of the floor or the steps themselves.

I'm also curious about options that could be placed outside, or even in a junk room off of my kitchen.

thanks for any and all input.

and, we will have to go with something new because we need to attain financing.


I suggest you start a new thread with these specific questions. Or restart your old one: Newb interested in alternative energy i.e. coal
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Pictures Of Your Boiler

PostBy: dh1200s On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 1:28 pm

strez123 wrote: My personal opinion from what I seen of this boiler and the cost a lot of happy customers .


Ditto for me.....slow to self-install (rookie) but I wanted to do it. This was an upgrade from my HS Tarm 202 hand fired boiler that I installed in 82. I have saved mucho $,$$$ over the years with the Tarm boiler. The WL110K was a 65th birthday present for me to reduce trips to the basement. I also run a Harman TLC 2K in the family room. Painters tape on the piping was for IR temp gun readings. Still need to move out the 79 WM boiler, cleaning up load center wiring and and my messy basement......I need to focus as the better half reminds me.

LL Customer Service :D

My install post http://nepacrossroads.com/about24010.html.
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dh1200s
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL-110
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: HS-Tarm 202
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman TLC 2000

Visit Lehigh Anthracite