hf-70 keystoker

Baro Damper

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 8:39 am

mina678 wrote:anybody have any info on the slip deal that I tried to explain above

Also

How about info on stting a barometric damper

Thanks

Tim


You do need a manometer. I found that there was a difference between where I placed the weight on the baro damper and the actual draft reading. The manometer takes the guess work out of setting the draft.

See the photo of my set-up regarding the baro damper location. On the stove pipe just below the tee where the baro damper is located is the fitting where I attach the line to the manometer.

Hope this helps.

John
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Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:16 am

These are Field Controls instructions for wood and coal units with their type RC.

http://www.fieldcontrols.com/pdfs/04592700.pdf
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

PostBy: mina678 On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 3:32 pm

I have a dwyer slack tube manometer that should work for checking the draft I can't tell for sure if you are into the tee just behind the baro damper or are you in the main chimney pipe? .I will be reading the links you sent about barometric dampers later tonight

what kind of numbers would I like to see
mina678
 

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PostBy: coaledsweat On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 4:57 pm

mina678 wrote:I have a dwyer slack tube manometer that should work for checking the draft
what kind of numbers would I like to see


The slack tube won't be much help as you need to measure in the hundreths of inches. An incline manometer or a draft gauge is what you need to measure drafts in the less than a tenth range (.02-.08 range is your target).
Graingers has the Dwyer incline manometer for about $30.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 6:09 pm

The fitting for the manometer is in the vertical pipe just below the tee that the baro damper is placed in. In that position it will read the draft to the stove. If the test point was between the baro damper and the entry to the chimney, it out read the full draft that the chimney is producing.

Also remember that you should have a full fire when measuring the draft and setting the baro damper.

John
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

PostBy: mina678 On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 7:44 pm

ok the target is .02-.08 now that is the draft reading I would like to achieve ,
My pipe comes straight off my stove (6") with about a 6 in long stub which has a manual damper installed and on top of that is the baro tee. On top of that 30 inches of 6 " black iron flue pipe to probably 30 feet of 8 stainless flue pipe.

So when I measure the draft ( I will order the right manometer in the AM)
I will have to drill a hole and have some sort of way to plug or cap it of when I take the tube out right . What do you use to go in the flue copper tube or something?
The way I'm thinking about this wouldnt the draft change with weather conditions, Do you leave the manometer hooked up all the time so you can monitor the draft and fiddle with the vents to maintain the .02 -.08 target

I want the port in the part of the baro tee that is vertical Right???

This will tell me the Chimney draft is that correct ??
My thought is if I get the draft zeroed in good it should limit my coal use correct ??

I just put my pipe together tonight and check around with a lighter By the ash door vent and the spring damper on the stove it seems like there is a lot of draft,Maybe that is why I burned what I thought was a lot of wood over the years.
Wouldn't the draft increase once the stove is warmed up ??
Thanks for all you time I hope I'm not to vague in what I'm trying to say

Tim
mina678
 

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 8:01 pm

mina678 wrote:I will have to drill a hole and have some sort of way to plug or cap it of when I take the tube out right . What do you use to go in the flue copper tube or something?

The way I'm thinking about this wouldnt the draft change with weather conditions, Do you leave the manometer hooked up all the time so you can monitor the draft and fiddle with the vents to maintain the .02 -.08 target.


.02-.08 is the range you need to read in. Most handfired stoves and boilers you want to limit the draft to .06. On some stokers it may be lower.

I put the hole in an elbow prior to the baro. I used a piece of automotive brake tubing for the probe. When I'm done testing the draft, I just stick a probe thermometer in the hole, that works out well.

Once it is set your done pretty much as the baros only purpose is to limit the draft at a setpoint. The draft may go up and down as conditions change, but the maximum draft will be fixed at your setpoint.
You need to zero a mano before each use too.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

PostBy: mina678 On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 8:26 pm

Once it is set your done pretty much as the baros only purpose is to limit the draft at a setpoint. The draft may go up and down as conditions change, but the maximum draft will be fixed at your setpoint.

I'm beginning to catch on
mina678
 

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 8:33 pm

Coaledsweat is exactly right as far as the installation and setting.
I used a 1/4" MPT X 1/4" compression fitting to go into the pipe with a legnth of 1/4" copper tubing to dissipate heat, then connected that to the tubing to the manometer (because that's what I had on hand).
I found that the draft on the chimney varies quite a bit, as the baro damper will move a lot when it's windy out, etc. Yes, the draft does increase when the chimney warms up.

Draft is less critical when burning wood. My chimney was originally built for a coal kitchen stove, I burned wood with it for years without a baro damper.

John
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

PostBy: mina678 On: Thu Oct 11, 2007 8:47 pm

I thought I was getting the hang of this but I just sat down and was looikng at the stove and was wondering how do the ash door vents and spring vent work if the draft is already limited by the baro.

I guess the ash door vent and spring vent only work within the .02-.08 range ???

My wife is wondering if there will ever be a fire in this thing

Tim
mina678
 

PostBy: mina678 On: Sat Oct 13, 2007 4:36 am

I ordered the manoneter directly from dwyer it should be here by tuesday I will let you know how it goes

I guess the ash door vent and spring vent only work within the .02-.08 range ??? Anybody

Tim
mina678
 

PostBy: LsFarm On: Sat Oct 13, 2007 10:42 am

Hi Tim, the ash door vent should be your main control letting air in under the coal bed, providing combustion air to the coal.

The spring vent... I'm not sure what you mean, this may be an item on Keystokers. Can you post a photo or scan in a drawing from the owners manual of this 'spring vent' ??

The baro just takes the irregularities out of the chimney's draft. If the wind is blowing real hard, the chimney's draft can double. I've watched my Manometer go from .05" up to .12" with wind gusts. I don't have a baro on my chimney, but will for the 'new AA boiler'

The other variable is outside temperature. The chimney draft is cause by the warm [less dense, therfore lighter] coal-heated air rising to the top of the chimney and expanding into the cooler denser air. If the outside temps are warm, the temp differential is less, and therfore the chimney draft is less.

Once you have the baro set, you will see the flapper working on gusty windy days, and not move at all on calm warm days.

Hope this helps. Looking forward to a photo or two.

Greg L

l
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

PostBy: mina678 On: Sat Oct 13, 2007 4:36 pm

I will take some photo's and see if I can post them here. The spring deal is on the back of the stove and it lets air in as well it has a dial on it for more heat or less heat .
The spring is not really a spring but works kinda like one it's flat and changes it's tension from the heat in the stove to act as a thermostat kinda .
There is a flap hooked to a small chain and it opens and closes over a 2x2 hole in the ash area under the coal that allows air in under the coal as well for combustion.
Do you think that I will have to leave the vents open on the ash door as well as the chain flap.
I'm going to TRY andstart it up later tonight it's getting chilly in New York But I will not be filling it beacuse I dont want it to hot

Do you know what i mean now it's kinda hard to explain

Tim














do
mina678
 

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Sat Oct 13, 2007 6:33 pm

mina678 wrote:or less heat .
The spring is not really a spring but works kinda like one it's flat and changes it's tension from the heat in the stove to act as a thermostat kinda .
There is a flap hooked to a small chain and it opens and closes over a 2x2 hole in the ash area under the coal that allows air in under the coal as well for combustion.


This sounds like the old style draft regulators, they work with a bi-metal spring.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

PostBy: LsFarm On: Sat Oct 13, 2007 7:00 pm

The spring vent is a 'poor man's thermostat'. Like coaledsweat said it is a bimetal string that will open and close the vent to attempt to keep the temperature where the spring is located constant.

I think you will be making the large adjustments with the air vent on the ash pan door, and let the thermostat-spring control the find adjustments. I'm not sure about this, since I've never played with a thermostaticly controled vent.

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

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