Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: 63roundbadge On: Sat Oct 08, 2011 10:33 pm

Thanks for the compliments, I'm quite happy how it turned out. I drilled 2 holes in each unit as seen on the back of the heatsink and used stainless bolts and washers from the inside. I had to grind opposite flats a bit on the nuts to fit between the fins, which also then held them captive to tighten. I have a pistol infrared temp guage and will post what I find. I would imagine the fins would be the same temp as the side of the stove, after saturating. However, I hope to have a few degrees different at the tips of the fins, then I think I am transferring max heat from the firebox?

Embarrassingly, I have to admit that surrounding the fill hopper door on top of the stove I have a assortment of used computer heatsinks, having serviced for IBM. I figure the more surface area, the better. The built-in plenum with the front exit formed by the cover benefits from all these heat sinks.

It WOULD be interesting to run mine and a stock Kodiak to see if I wasted my efforts...
63roundbadge
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: dlj On: Sun Oct 09, 2011 7:54 am

I would have flipped those heat sinks 90 degrees so the air flow moving up would flow better through the fins. Did you use any kind of thermo coupling between the plates and the stove side? You might want to think about that a bit. That can make a big difference in the amount of heat gets transfered. It would have to be a high temperature material. It would take some research to find the right one. Good luck with it, nice job on the fins.

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: 63roundbadge On: Sun Oct 09, 2011 11:11 am

Actually I did use a coating of DowCorning 340 Heat Sink Compound. Forgot to mention that. I had a 5 oz. tube from my IBM days. I thought about the vertical advantage but since I'm using the box fan to give it a breeze and the fins are only 1.5" deep I opted for the more pleasing look. Ifigure anything's better than what I had.
Thanks!
63roundbadge
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak

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Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: dlj On: Sun Oct 09, 2011 11:47 am

63roundbadge wrote:Actually I did use a coating of DowCorning 340 Heat Sink Compound. Forgot to mention that. I had a 5 oz. tube from my IBM days. I thought about the vertical advantage but since I'm using the box fan to give it a breeze and the fins are only 1.5" deep I opted for the more pleasing look. Ifigure anything's better than what I had.
Thanks!


340 is rated to 200 deg C which is 392 deg F. Might work. It would be too low for my stove as 400 on the side wall is low. I'll idle down below that, but when I'm pumping out heat, I'll be up in the 500 to 600 deg F range or above sometimes. Let us know how it works for you. What they say something does and what it does do are sometimes quite different...

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: 63roundbadge On: Sun Oct 09, 2011 12:47 pm

Thanks for that info, did not know that. I shot the sides last season w/infrared, top and sides were 380, actual fire w/door open was 860 in the red glow. Stack temp is higher than my old Efel, but then they knew how to maximize the heat exchange by exiting the flue in the front and running it around the outside in a runner w/cast-in fins.
63roundbadge
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: oliver power On: Sun Oct 09, 2011 8:48 pm

That's one of the features I like about the HITZER E- Z Flow stoves. They have finned heat exchangers.
oliver power
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: KEYSTOKER Kaa-2
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93 & 30-95, Vigilant (pre-Vigilant-II)
Baseburners & Antiques: MANY (Mostly when burning wood)
Stove/Furnace Make: HITZER / KEYSTOKER
Stove/Furnace Model: 50-93 & 30-95 , Kaa-2

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: Freddy On: Mon Oct 10, 2011 7:24 am

I'm wondering how they attach also. They look good. Hope they do the trick!
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: 63roundbadge On: Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:25 pm

Freddy wrote:I'm wondering how they attach also. They look good. Hope they do the trick!


See the entry on the top of page 2. Drilled holes, SS bolts from inside out... Like I said, anything's gotta be better than flat sides, 4X the surface area.
63roundbadge
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: wsherrick On: Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:55 pm

Anything you can do to create air turbulance around the radiating surfaces of the stove will increase the stove's radiating efficiency. It also allows the air to mix better thus creating a more uniform temperature in the room.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: 63roundbadge On: Sat Oct 22, 2011 10:47 pm

I'm happy to say I can really tell a difference with the heat sinks! If I did it again though, I would mount them lower on the sides, as they really do radiate the heat available to them. Burning at a low rate now, the coal bed is not visible, and the walls are hottest below the heat sinks. The burn is so low, I can't even see any red. Once it's running hotter, and the bed is high, the heat sinks will of course be closer to the hot spot. The temp gauge really tells the story---when I turn up the box fan in back they lower in temp due to giving up heat. If I turn the fan off, they saturate and are the same temp as the wall. I figure this is good, as they are giving up heat to the air. Can't wait to throttle up and see what happens.
63roundbadge
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: 63roundbadge On: Wed Nov 02, 2011 8:53 pm

An update-When the stove is throttled up, the placement of the heat sinks is perfect. The hottest area is where they're installed, and I can really see how much heat they give up relative to the speed and volume of the box fan. Stack temperature is lower, so I must be sending more heat to the room? My next venture is to mount a heat sink vertically on the back where the thermostatic air control would mount. The fan blows directly on that area, more free heat to send into the room instead of up the chimney. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND this alteration if possible.
63roundbadge
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: 2001Sierra On: Wed Nov 02, 2011 10:06 pm

I feel sorry for that plant in the pot on the top of the stove. :lol: Kidding aside I think you have a good idea. Proper placement as well as good looks are a good idea. Your installation is something I and others I am sure would be interested in installing if the materials are obtainable.Would a vertical installation contribute to better heat flow due the venturi effect? Just a thought.
2001Sierra
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90 Chimney vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Buderus Oil Boiler 3115-34
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker 90 Chimney Vent

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: 63roundbadge On: Thu Nov 03, 2011 6:27 am

2001Sierra wrote:Would a vertical installation contribute to better heat flow due the venturi effect? Just a thought.


Vertical would of course be better, going from radiation to convection. I'm going to install the rear sink that way, as it's out of view. In order to pass the aesthetic test from my roommate, I opted for the horizontal sides. Also entering into that decision was that heat sinks seem to be extruded longer rather than wider, so I would have had to mount 4 shorter units vs 2 long ones. Still better than the slab sides with 4X the surface area. Check ebay if you're looking for some, they really are available and affordable.

The plastic plant is safely behind it now on the mantle. It's been replaced by my clothing warming up presently to get dressed for work. Nothing like warm socks to start the day now that I have power back after 5 days of candlelight and warm beer!
63roundbadge
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: 63roundbadge On: Sat Nov 05, 2011 10:10 am

Ashcat wrote:Very nice job. It'll be interesting to see if you see differences in heat output, coal usage and oil usage this winter.



I am seeing MUCH LESS coal usage after installing heat sinks on the slab sides of my stove. I'm using 1 less bucket for every 5 that I normally used at the same burn rate. Stack temperature is proportionately lower also, which means more heat is given off to the room in my estimation. I'm also emptying the ash bin less frequently. Without much calculation that's either 20 or 25% less coal being used?

I'm now trying to find a heat sink to fit the rear slab where the optional automatic air control would be installed. It's another area 15 x 6" that is untapped for heat, right next to the flue exit. The balance of the rear wall is covered by a welded plenum for the optional blower. That is always cool due to the fan blowing on it and through it exiting under the cover and out the front.

We haven't had the oil burner on since I started the stove, and even through the 6 days w/o electricity we've been as warm as usual. Even had others staying overnight until their electric came back.

ALSO, 6 years ago I found by accident when my old furnace leaked and was without domestic hot water that a electric water heater only cost me $15 per month for hot water, 2 people. I borrowed a unused 115v 20 gallon hot water heater from a friend's barn for the summer until my new furnace was installed. After this revelation I installed a 220v permanent 30 gallon water heater, perfect for 2 showers at the same time. I piped it in like a water softener w/ball gate valves so that I can cut off either furnace or water heater so I can use either. I have the water trickling through the furnace first to take the chill off it when the furnace is on.

In a cross-post here's what I did to extend the life of the glass:

Extending life of Door Glass

I love GRIZZLY2's quote and agree that in addition to beating the energy system that "The only redeeming value of winter is that I can have a fire in my stove."
63roundbadge
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiak

Re: Anyone attach aluminum or steel heat sinks to your stove?

PostBy: Vinmaker On: Mon Dec 12, 2011 7:44 pm

I love your mod. After seeing this post I just might try this also. :)

Vin.
Vinmaker
 
Stove/Furnace Make: HARMAN
Stove/Furnace Model: SF-250

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