Buildings that heated with coal

Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: samhill On: Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:12 am

In the legal world it's get one of your firms partners elected so you'll have a source of inside information, anything that my instill fear is gold, they also seem to be big on medications as well. Even if they have side effects written in twenty different languages & a doctor prescribes them it's the makers fault if something happens after long term use or abuse. Then we wonder why meds cost so much & take such a long time to get approved.
samhill
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: keystoker 160
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: AA130FIREMAN On: Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:23 am

I know of an old underwear mill that was heated with coal. A bunch of lawyers aquired it with the historical society, they preserved the look of the building and turned it into an old folks, non assisted living home. It was heated by coal, as a young boy I remember the BIG piles of coal and ashes to play on. The historacle society had them retain the loading door portion of the boiler, but it was locked shut. As a side note, the historacle society wanted to retain a cement loading dock, you had to walk into the street to pass it :mad: . That idea was nixed, their were no 18 wheel trailers pulled by horses. :lol:
AA130FIREMAN
 
Stove/Furnace Make: axeman anderson
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: samhill On: Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:31 am

The delivery wagons were most likely that height, it was probably to safety factor that made them take it out.
samhill
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: keystoker 160
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: AA130FIREMAN On: Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:43 am

samhill wrote:The delivery wagons were most likely that height, it was probably to safety factor that made them take it out.
Yes, and yes, but I believe the origional loading dock was made of wood. It was dumb walking down the pavement to run into a big cement cube. Old factories made improvements over the years, and this one closed in the mid 80's. Alot of my family worked their at one point. The textile mills (mostly) closed up in this area, and the US in general. The only thing we manufacture anymore in the US is money, and they can print that at an alarming rate :(
AA130FIREMAN
 
Stove/Furnace Make: axeman anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: 130 anthratube

Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: samhill On: Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:47 am

They probably had to build extra big loading docks there. :cry: And not to forget all those one dollar coins that I believe they finally stopped stamping out. :mad:
samhill
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: keystoker 160
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: Vampiro On: Thu Feb 09, 2012 4:24 am

Duengeon master wrote:
envisage wrote:My very first memory of coal is as a child in elementary school growing up in the Bronx, NYC. I vividly remember coal (probably bit) being delivered to the school in the big truck, going down the chute, into someplace I never saw. Boy, that stuff was dirty ... however, I grew up and now I am burning coal! ;-)

NYC schools burned anthracite. I saw an article on the news there once where they were saying that there are several schools that are still burning coal. This was during the late 90's.



They burned coal up until the 2000's. I warned them that the boiler replacements would be a bad idea and actually was really involved in trying to change things and inform individuals with facts, and solutions. There was even misinformation posted about coal on a website. When I tried to engage in a civil discussion through e-mail, the responses were not so nice to say the least when I presented them with factual information and studies. It went against their coal is bad agenda, so let's waste money by replacing boilers fueled by coal in the schools. Hell, I was only about 16 at the time when I forewarned them and engaged in e-mailing and discussions about those issues. So fast forward and look at what happened.

-Billions were spent on boiler replacements.
-A one year increase in fuel costs alone could have heated 300 coal schools for 7 years.
- The savings in fuel could have went back to the taxpayers, and a portion could have even funded other well needed upgrades, more books, or increases in salaries.
- The heating plants could have had one or two boilers converted to burn oil/gas for a backup where desired eliminating the need for complete replacement, and also emission controls could have been installed for the heating plant to allay any further concerns about emissions.

Hey kid, you make too much sense and will ruin our agenda :nono: ...move along, nothing to see here. :annoyed:
Vampiro
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson S260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: #45 BAD HWH
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mk1
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite, Pea Coal
Other Heating: POS gas boiler

Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: NoSmoke On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:47 am

Interesting...I live in Maine and so there is not a whole lot heated here with coal industrially..

We did build a new high school in 2010 and they were smart enough to build a new boiler that used biomass instead of oil. They said this new boiler uses half the heating budget that the old school used, but because of all the smart boards and computer-everything gizmos...the electrical consumption is also double of the old school. The boiler does have enough capacity however to not only heat the school, but also the radiant loops imbedded in the sidewalks. The groundskeepers do not have to shovel snow at all, it simply melts. The boiler consumes about 1 truck load of clean chips per week during the heating system and is a K-12 with about 1500 kids. I think that is roughly 20 cords of wood chips per week.

This school sits on top of a high hill and they were going to put in a 1 million dollar windmill but the cost was too high and they were already over budget.

The one thing this school gets high accolades for though, is in feeding the kids. They are the only school in the nation that uses locally raised food for the school lunch program. A lot of schools do raise veggies and stuff locally, but this school uses all their food, including the beef that comes from the beef farm across the road. It does not get any more local then that. It is all USDA inspected and professionally raised, but it is locally produced. Even the high school football scoreboard is different, it says "Got Milk?" instead of being a Pepsi or Coke sign, and was raised by locally dairy farmers who coughed up $2 per cow for ever one they milked on this one particular morning. They get national awards for their nutrition programs.
NoSmoke
 
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: lsayre On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 8:18 am

Many of the buildings in Cleveland's prestigious and expansive "University Circle" area were (as late as 2010 at least) still being heated by steam generation from burning coal. But that may have already changed. I'll have to see if I can find any updates to the below 2010 news clips. They may still be heating these buildings with coal.

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index ... still.html

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index ... sit_3.html
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (if I ever get it fixed)

Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: samhill On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 9:03 am

I ran across this article & it made sense to me but besides strip mines & even being a member of the UCM union for awhile I have never been in a mine. I think many of us forget that they could be mining right beneath us in many areas. Those here with actual experience will probably know better, not looking for an argument here just some opinion just because stuff doesn't affect our way of life directly doesn't mean someone else isn't affected. http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/bl ... l-20110928
samhill
 
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: lsayre On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 9:29 am

Similar arguments can be made for oil and natural gas. The easy to get (and thereby economical) stuff within the 48 consecutive States is well past peak. Oil production in the USA is currently only 50% of what it was in 1970, though there is a blip of a resurgence due to the technology of horizontal drilling opening up the Bakken oilfield to production (albeit expensive production). Natural gas is seeing a brief (perhaps a decade or two at best) resurgence due to fracking. Perhaps coal mining could see a similar resurgence if some new methods of extraction come along and the government stays out of the way. Or perhaps the government will step in and spoil the fracking party and take away our decade or two resurgence in NG output.

So why kiss coal goodbye just because it is past peak? It's almost like the author is reveling and gloating in its demise, with a smirky smile of pompousness and importance upon his face while he is typing. It's like hitting and kicking a man when he is down instead of helping him get back up on his feet again. It is the mob mentality of the collective (I.E., the gang). This is how I see our government functioning today. What becomes of democracy (mob rule) if collective wisdom does not arise from a pool of individual ignorance, but rather something more dark and ominous akin to the gleeful evil of a street gang on the prowl for some innocent and unaware victim to knock out arises instead? Are we benefiting from the collective, or are we merely trying to remain hidden among the rest of the masses who cower beneath its radar screens in the hope of not becoming victims of its gang like tentacle reach?
Last edited by lsayre on Sun Oct 28, 2012 10:04 am, edited 2 times in total.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (if I ever get it fixed)

Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: I'm On Fire On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 9:40 am

steamup wrote:You can't judge a book by the cover. This is not the orginal boiler in the building you are looking at. I believe the breeching was abated and re-covered with a calcium silicate product in the 1990's. The covering is a painted cloth. In any case, a independent agency is hired to test all suspect materials for asbestos and the asbestos is abated prior to construction. There were over 3000 products that used asbestos. Not only insulation, but caulk, gaskets, adhesives, roof products, siding, floor tile and the list goes on. You can't tell by looking at it, it has to be tested.


I was just going to say that. You definitely can't tell asbestos from any other material. I've always been told if you aren't sure, don't touch it. Hell, I've also learned that if I'm not sure of an area don't enter it.
I'm On Fire
 
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: coalnewbie On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 9:57 am

OTOH in England after WWII our house was destroyed and we lived on a 75' MTB with the engines ripped out. The exhausts etc.were covered in think asbestos and as a 7 year old I spent the summer in the bilges ripping out the rest of that stuff and yes definitely asbestos and knee deep for weeks. You see only the good die young. Yes, it is evil stuff.
coalnewbie
 
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: Duengeon master On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 10:11 am

My Oldest son goes to Bloomsburg University. He stays in the Montour house Dorm. His room overlooks the powerhouse. Everyday they receive a tri axle of coal. Lately they have received more than one a day on certain days of the week.
Duengeon master
 
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: KLook On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 10:20 am

The boiler consumes about 1 truck load of clean chips per week during the heating system and is a K-12 with about 1500 kids. I think that is roughly 20 cords of wood chips per week.


Now take a ride up to Washington County and see what this mentality has created. Don't be fooled by the expanses of forest in the distance. Get out in it and see what it looks like close up. Now ride through any region from Bangor, ME down to Chattanooga, Tenn. and see what a forest looks like. Renewable my ass and its better done if its out of sight and out of mind up in the parts of the state that don't matter. No one lives there you know.

Kevin

When the built the Ultrapower plant in Jonesboro, ME, it was going to burn only trash wood. Limbs, alders, pallets, whatever locals could bring in and grind up, etc. As soon as it opened it was subsidized and they only took premium hardwood. Contracts were awarded and reneged on, only big time operators could supply them with TT loads of premium wood. Junk species "plugged up" the Euro design boiler. Like they didn't know it beforehand. Bottom line, it only operates when your tax dollar subsidizes it. they can't make money with out a subsidy, just like wind.

To be at least a little on topic, that room and setup look like the one in the old Calais middle school where I got my first coal to use. Bit also.
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
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Re: Buildings that heated with coal

PostBy: NoSmoke On: Mon Oct 29, 2012 7:36 am

I hear you.

What irks me is the pellet manufactures in Maine. Up until a few years ago there was none in the state, but then they claimed if they came in...with tax incentives of course...they industry would jump start hundreds of jobs. They made those claims based on wood coming from loggers harvesting trees. After they were funded however, what they did was take the easy road, instead of using wood that loggers supplied, and that entire chain of employment...from logger to pellet truck driver delivery man...they simply started buying sawdust from existing sawmills.

As dairy farmers, we saw our bedding costs quadruple overnight. No kidding there my friend...no kidding at all. Last year our bedding costs for 1200 cows was $100,000 dollars. It was not like that before because the sawdust was either sold to farmers, or burned in their own sawmill boilers to make steam and electricity. Now that the pellet makers cannot get enough of it, simply put, supply and demand has made sawdust a valuable commodity. As I said on another thread in here, the price of milk is already low and we are struggling to get by...high bedding costs do not help!

Bedding costs are so bad, that dairy farms have resorted to buying dehydrators for their manure. What they do is take the cow manure, dehydrate it and then mix it with sawdust to make it stretch farther. For those that do not have dehydrators, the low cost solution to high bedding costs is to buy a cheap product that is dehydrated human manure. Yep human poop...no joke there. These waste water treatment plants cannot process 1% of the human waste they take in, they call it sludge and so they haul it to a plant in Unity Plantation, Maine, compost it, then dehydrate it and sell it to dairy farmers cheap. On our farm we do not use it, it is messy (black ooze) and just plain wrong to have human poop in so close proximity to a product (milk) that people ingest for nutrition. But some dairy farmers in Maine are in no position to buy high priced pure sawdust bedding like we do. It is the same issue we have faced for years...make something we need, out of something someone cannot get rid of.

I am not making any of this up, and then my Dad wonders why I am so disappointed with his new pellet boiler. The pellet manufactures in Maine really have fleeced the Maine people on many different levels and it is downright sickening how dairy farms have had to compete against them. It is a sad chain of events that has led to some poor policy making regarding heat, jobs, human waste and milk.
NoSmoke
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: New Yoker WC90
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vogelzang Pot Bellied Stove
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