Anyone know much about these boilers...?

Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: pura vida On: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:20 pm

Trying to find a boiler that is going to work for me but i'm having hard time. as the title says, anyone know any good or bad about these two. they are made in poland, here is the site where they can be found.

kotly.com

these are the two boilers,
Per-Eko or Ling

thanks

cory
pura vida
 

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: freetown fred On: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:25 pm

you get what you pay for my friend ;)
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: lsayre On: Wed Jun 01, 2011 8:41 pm

Since they are European boilers, parts and service may prove to be a nightmare.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (if I ever get it fixed)


Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: rockwood On: Wed Jun 01, 2011 9:46 pm

Don't know about those boilers at all but how much would it cost just for shipping to AK?
rockwood
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Stokermatic coal furnace
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Rockwood Stoveworks Circulator
Baseburners & Antiques: Malleable/Monarch Range
Coal Size/Type: Soft coal: Lump and stoker (slack coal)

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: pura vida On: Thu Jun 02, 2011 1:48 pm

freetown fred wrote:you get what you pay for my friend ;)



couldn't agree more, but why are these bad? what's wrong with them? please, please give me some better options that will burn sub-bit and are underfed. i'm not having much luck getting suggestions and everything i can find says to burn just anthracite (sp?). and are usually gravity fed, which seems to be concern with sub-bit. shipping would be expensive and parts would obviously be a bitch, but everything i've found up here are the outdoor boilers in a dog house. which will be $15-20K so i would still be way ahead even with the shipping. i want an inside underfed stoker boiler for new construction. i know what i want is out there, am i just looking in the wrong places?? thanks

pv
pura vida
 

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Thu Jun 02, 2011 3:04 pm

Not sure if they are available but EFM was testing a boiler with a modified design that used soft coal:

Testing of Nova Scotia Bituminous

One very important thing I will point out, be sure it's been tested with the coal you want to use. If you get a coal that is going to klinker a lot it's going to be a nightmare.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: freetown fred On: Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:17 pm

You pointed out the only bad aspects that I can think of--if one of those stoves prove to be the ONE--go for it--just be sure you're comfortable with the manufacturer--hell, sometimes people have problems here in the States with the manufacturers :( --to give you an idea of my geographical knowledge up your way--for all I know, you may be closer to Poland then you are to Pa/NY :clap: toothy
pura vida wrote:
freetown fred wrote:you get what you pay for my friend ;)



couldn't agree more, but why are these bad? what's wrong with them? please, please give me some better options that will burn sub-bit and are underfed. i'm not having much luck getting suggestions and everything i can find says to burn just anthracite (sp?). and are usually gravity fed, which seems to be concern with sub-bit. shipping would be expensive and parts would obviously be a bitch, but everything i've found up here are the outdoor boilers in a dog house. which will be $15-20K so i would still be way ahead even with the shipping. i want an inside underfed stoker boiler for new construction. i know what i want is out there, am i just looking in the wrong places?? thanks

pv
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: pura vida On: Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:29 pm

i know of a couple per-eko boilers that are being used up here with the coal we have and in a colder area that i live in. they bought from the site i listed above. i haven't had a chance to talk to the owner directly yet, although i'm hoping to soon, just the coal distributor that supplies coal to them. i'm a little frustrated b/c i'm having a harder time than i expected finding different options that will work for me.

i am building new, have no access to nat gas and oil is over $4/gallon now. if i can get the details figured out i want an underfed stoker in my dedicated mechanical room with an excavated and lined (cement, wood, ??) 10-20 ton storage bin on the outside of the building with the coal being augured through the wall. it would be really nice if i could also add an ash augur and send the ash back through the wall someplace outside.

so i was under the impression, from reading other post here, people preferred klinkers to ash? is this wrong? or does it depend on the boiler and setup?

thanks

pv
pura vida
 

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: Berlin On: Thu Jun 02, 2011 4:47 pm

loose ash is nice if you want to have an ash auger. If you don't want/can't do an ash auger setup, a clinkering type stoker is nice because it substantially reduces the volume of ash that you have to cart out of the basement. The only other downside to a clinkering type stoker is that, depending on the size of the ash pan with a non-clinkering stoker, you may have more frequent clinker removal; generally once/day in cold weather and once every other day in mild weather. If you have a non-clinkering type stoker, the volume of ash removed may be much higher, but with a large ash pan you may be able to go a few days in cold weather without ash removal; if you're using high ash, low btu alaska coal, chances are you won't be able to go more than a day between ash removal with either type of stoker.
Berlin
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: pura vida On: Thu Jun 02, 2011 6:58 pm

thanks for the info berlin, that lined me out. the search continues...
pura vida
 

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Thu Jun 02, 2011 8:31 pm

pura vida wrote:so i was under the impression, from reading other post here, people preferred klinkers to ash? is this wrong? or does it depend on the boiler and setup?


My advice was specific to the efm, should have made that clear. Anthracite white ash doesn't clinker at all, the red ash has a tendency to clinker a little especially if fired really hot. The efm is designed for for coal with those characteristics and the internals can't accommodate large clinkers, simply not enough space and/or obstructions for it to fall into the ash tub if it's large. I know one thing, if the efm is suitable I'd consider it over any European stoker especially if the European model is going to exceed the cost of the efm. That's a once in lifetime purchase. ;)

Here is some videos from testing with coal from Wyoming, that coal would be very suitable, As you can see it's powder. The major modifications they made is larger auger and they used a prill pot which apparently grinds the clinkers up.



Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: pura vida On: Fri Jun 03, 2011 1:59 am

thanks for the info and vids. i'll try to call efm directly and see if it would work for me. thanks again.

pv
pura vida
 

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: coalnewbie On: Fri Jun 03, 2011 3:52 am

Here comes that EFM pitch again. Massive infrastructure costs in hydronics and chimneys and it's just not necessary. That's all I will say, my posts say the rest. Giving specific stove advice without seeing the actual location and money available is a troublesome position to me. EFM won't work for me and my solutions worked GREAT last winter. Look before you leap.
coalnewbie
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL AnthraKing 180K, Pocono110K,KStokr 90K, DVC
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93,
Baseburners & Antiques: Invader 2 Wings Best, Glenwood #8 + Herald 116x
Coal Size/Type: Rice, Chestnut
Other Heating: Heating Oil CH, Toyotomi OM 22

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: pura vida On: Fri Jun 03, 2011 11:28 pm

i'm definitely not set on any specific boiler yet. just looking for suggestions so i can hopefully make an informed decision. what type of boiler are you using?

pv
pura vida
 

Re: Anyone know much about these boilers...?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Sat Jun 04, 2011 3:02 am

coalnewbie wrote: Massive infrastructure costs in hydronics and chimneys and it's just not necessary.


In some cases it isn't, you may already have the baseboard. Having said that baseboard heating can't be beat if you want to make the investment. ;)

Chimney? You need a chimney or you can cut costs short term by power venting but that doesn't save money long term.

coalnewbie wrote:Giving specific stove advice without seeing the actual location and money available is a troublesome position to me.


The OP was asking about boilers and in this case soft coal boilers. There is a very limited amount of products available whether it's a boiler of hot air furnace.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite