Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sun Nov 27, 2011 9:59 am

mason coal burner wrote:the shaker system in the 111 and 109 are different than the others . it is a circular grate that rotates back and forth . i am heating 2700 sq ft over two floors and the stove is way off to one end . i also measure my temp on the side near the top .


Your Glenwood 111 is similar to my Star Herald in at least the grate system. They call them draw bar grates and the fork is the shaker. On my Herald, I've never had to poke up through the grates although I do have to shake allot more than my prismatic grated Glenwood Cookstove. Sometimes I've counted 100 back and forth motions before I get a nice orange glow back into the ashpan. That's the disadvantage of the drawbar type while the advantage is that you waste nothing and never spill any large pieces which is easy to do on the faster but less precise bar grates.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Nov 30, 2011 8:53 pm

stovehospital wrote:Just an" I told you so!" from Emery. For years people passed by the 109-111 Glenwoods to look at other stoves. Once they try one they are usually amazed at the efficiency and the power of the stoves. I use a Magee Vendome in my shop. You saw it when you visited. That stove can be running at 600 on the barrel and you can reach up above the damper and put you hand on the stove pipe. It is about as hot as a nice blueberry muffin. My son heats a two bedroom ranch with a Spicer base heater and burned a total of 55 Gals of oil last year. The coal is reduced to dust in most cases and the fire just keeps on going. Now I am having trouble finding enough of these base heaters for my customers. AS time goes by nyou be more and more impressed with the design and efficiency of these stoves.


I had no doubts about these stoves at all. That's why I came to you looking for one. I am really pleased with both Glenwoods. With both of these stoves I just need a bigger house now. At first when I started raving about these stoves here a few years ago, nobody believed me. I was viewed as just an eccentric crack pot, now that others are finding out about these masterpieces and how good they are. My original claims don't seem so outlandish now. ;)
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Nov 30, 2011 9:02 pm

mason coal burner wrote:i am still heating my house with just the 111 glenwood . i haven't had to fire up the hitzer yet . it hasn't been that cold . i am going threw about 40-50 lbs / day stove running 300-400 degrees that seems like alot from what others running baseburners a going threw . any thoughts or suggestions . william i was wondering if you have to poke up threw the grates after every shake down like i have to .


You need to get the extension handle that fits on the end of the shaker bar. With that you have the torque to shake out everything. You can probably fabricate an extension handle for your stove easily. It makes it a lot easier. Also get a short, straight steel rod to use as a poker. Open up the little door at the bottom of the firepot and with the straight poker you can clear out stubborn ash that way as well.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

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Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Dec 01, 2011 11:56 am

wsherrick wrote:
mason coal burner wrote:i am still heating my house with just the 111 glenwood . i haven't had to fire up the hitzer yet . it hasn't been that cold . i am going threw about 40-50 lbs / day stove running 300-400 degrees that seems like alot from what others running baseburners a going threw . any thoughts or suggestions . william i was wondering if you have to poke up threw the grates after every shake down like i have to .


You need to get the extension handle that fits on the end of the shaker bar. With that you have the torque to shake out everything. You can probably fabricate an extension handle for your stove easily. It makes it a lot easier. Also get a short, straight steel rod to use as a poker. Open up the little door at the bottom of the firepot and with the straight poker you can clear out stubborn ash that way as well.


When I made the mock up of my shaker fork (out of 1/4" plywood) to be cast at the foundry, I extended the handle about 3" for exactly that reason. Now with the fork fully pushed in no dumping mode, I have about 3" sticking out that I can grab to shake it with. More leverage and an easy motion. I try to avoid the clinker door if possible due to the mess it makes though. Ash can build up in back of it though, but I find it doesn't effect anything because it's infront of the primary air path and thus doesn't block anything.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Dec 20, 2011 7:11 pm

It's great thing when you can run a stove at 400 degrees for two days on about 30-40 pounds of coal at the most. This stove is extremely economical and I am very, very pleased with it. It runs constantly at the temperature output desired. Once you set the dampers and the stove is up to speed, it just stays there. There are no dead spots, unburned coal chunks, or coke that ends up in the ash pan.
The stove pipe temperatures run about the same as with the big Glenwood No 6. I can't tell which one is the most efficient yet. They both seem to perform at the same rate. The only difference is that the coal is more completely consumed at a lower temperatures in the No 9 which has the suspended fire pot. This is a most brilliant and effective design.
If you want a small to mid sized base heater, this design is the one to get. These stoves have no equal.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: SteveZee On: Tue Dec 20, 2011 7:43 pm

I agree Will, They are both superb designs. The burners were probably the simpler, easier design to manufacture due to the use of less parts. As far as the total burning of the coal, it's my guess that the big #6 would do the same thing (as the #9) with the drawbar grates. While the prismatic are sturdier and will last a couple of lifetimes, it's just easier to rock a few burning chunks through the grates. The drawbars type makes that almost impossible since it just doesn't let anything but ash get by the grate (without pulling the fork). It certainly takes allot more shaking though than the prismatics but it's only ash that falls in the pan.

I've found on my Herald, that when it's really cold and the stove has been working hard, the ash will actually fuse a bit and I'll have to push it a little from the top. Got to be careful though as the whole thing can collapse and snuff or make the fire slow to recover. It's why I always add fresh coal first and wait till it's lit before shaking.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: lobsterman On: Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:48 pm

But the prismatics I learned to shake not too hard just a very gentle rocking to drop the dust and not the embers.
lobsterman
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Base Heater No. 6

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: nortcan On: Tue Dec 20, 2011 11:04 pm

SteveZee wrote:I agree Will, They are both superb designs. The burners were probably the simpler, easier design to manufacture due to the use of less parts. As far as the total burning of the coal, it's my guess that the big #6 would do the same thing (as the #9) with the drawbar grates. While the prismatic are sturdier and will last a couple of lifetimes, it's just easier to rock a few burning chunks through the grates. The drawbars type makes that almost impossible since it just doesn't let anything but ash get by the grate (without pulling the fork). It certainly takes allot more shaking though than the prismatics but it's only ash that falls in the pan.

I've found on my Herald, that when it's really cold and the stove has been working hard, the ash will actually fuse a bit and I'll have to push it a little from the top. Got to be careful though as the whole thing can collapse and snuff or make the fire slow to recover. It's why I always add fresh coal first and wait till it's lit before shaking.


With a magazine , it helps to prevent the bridging, the load pushes on the coal bed and prepares the anthracite to burn by warming it before the burning time.
Just to be shure I understand correctly how the No 9's grate works, do the outer round grate can rotate when shaking?
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: stovehospital On: Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:56 am

I may have the extension handle for the #9 Glenwood. I had a bunch made last month but they have gone quickly.
I fired up the Houshold Peach Franklin and it was quite a trip. I got a little over enthusiastic in the beginning and the firepot turned a dull red. It took a while to calm it down. Turns out the stove needs a full firepot with everything closed down and the check open. It runs along slowly for hours and hours but the house was still 76. I will be lighting it off when it gets really cold and I can just let it run. It actually puts out more heat than my #6 Herald which is saying something.
How many people are going to coal?? I shipped 6 this week.
stovehospital
 
Stove/Furnace Make: 250 stoves in barns
Stove/Furnace Model: #6 Herald baseheater

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:00 pm

stovehospital wrote:I may have the extension handle for the #9 Glenwood. I had a bunch made last month but they have gone quickly.
I fired up the Houshold Peach Franklin and it was quite a trip. I got a little over enthusiastic in the beginning and the firepot turned a dull red. It took a while to calm it down. Turns out the stove needs a full firepot with everything closed down and the check open. It runs along slowly for hours and hours but the house was still 76. I will be lighting it off when it gets really cold and I can just let it run. It actually puts out more heat than my #6 Herald which is saying something.
How many people are going to coal?? I shipped 6 this week.

I was wondering if you had lit the Peach yet? That is one of the most beautiful and elegant stoves I have ever seen. All of those mica windows really let out the radiant heat. Mason Coal Burner here needs an extension handle for his Glenwood No 111. The handle you gave me works perfectly.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: nortcan On: Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:28 pm

stovehospital wrote:I may have the extension handle for the #9 Glenwood. I had a bunch made last month but they have gone quickly.
I fired up the Houshold Peach Franklin and it was quite a trip. I got a little over enthusiastic in the beginning and the firepot turned a dull red. It took a while to calm it down. Turns out the stove needs a full firepot with everything closed down and the check open. It runs along slowly for hours and hours but the house was still 76. I will be lighting it off when it gets really cold and I can just let it run. It actually puts out more heat than my #6 Herald which is saying something.
How many people are going to coal?? I shipped 6 this week.


Hi, I would like to know if the Household Peach franklin is a stove or a sort of """insert"""( I don't know the good word for it) to place in a fireplace alcove? I really like that ""stove"".
For the heat output, with what stove model would you compare it? What is the fire pot size? Are you planning to keep it for yourself or sell it?
If you have some more photos of it, I would greatly appreciate it.
Thanks.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: stovehospital On: Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:22 pm

I have a line on another Peach. The two of them came from one home and they are the only two I have ever seen. This one has a good firpot and I have new grates here. I will probably be able to pick it up in a week or two. I also plan to pick up an Our Glenwood 113 at the same time. That is a serious heater.
stovehospital
 
Stove/Furnace Make: 250 stoves in barns
Stove/Furnace Model: #6 Herald baseheater

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: echos67 On: Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:29 pm

Will, are you running both stoves now ?
It has been unusally warm here for the last several days and even into this weekend it is going to stay that way, gave me some down time to make some adjustments though.

Emery, What was the model of the little Glenwood you have refurbished that sits next to the old car on the lift and did you sell it yet ? That little stove has stuck in my mind, it sure was purty.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: wsherrick On: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:06 am

echos67 wrote:Will, are you running both stoves now ?
It has been unusally warm here for the last several days and even into this weekend it is going to stay that way, gave me some down time to make some adjustments though.

Emery, What was the model of the little Glenwood you have refurbished that sits next to the old car on the lift and did you sell it yet ? That little stove has stuck in my mind, it sure was purty.

It was a reasonably chilly weekend here at my house where the lows got down into the mid teens. I had both stoves working but I let the No 9 go out yesterday. It is less work believe it or not to run two highly efficient stoves at moderate temperatures during really cold weather than running one at a much higher rate.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood No 9 Base Burner-(hopefully) a few photos

PostBy: wsherrick On: Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:07 am

nortcan wrote:
SteveZee wrote:I agree Will, They are both superb designs. The burners were probably the simpler, easier design to manufacture due to the use of less parts. As far as the total burning of the coal, it's my guess that the big #6 would do the same thing (as the #9) with the drawbar grates. While the prismatic are sturdier and will last a couple of lifetimes, it's just easier to rock a few burning chunks through the grates. The drawbars type makes that almost impossible since it just doesn't let anything but ash get by the grate (without pulling the fork). It certainly takes allot more shaking though than the prismatics but it's only ash that falls in the pan.

I've found on my Herald, that when it's really cold and the stove has been working hard, the ash will actually fuse a bit and I'll have to push it a little from the top. Got to be careful though as the whole thing can collapse and snuff or make the fire slow to recover. It's why I always add fresh coal first and wait till it's lit before shaking.


With a magazine , it helps to prevent the bridging, the load pushes on the coal bed and prepares the anthracite to burn by warming it before the burning time.
Just to be shure I understand correctly how the No 9's grate works, do the outer round grate can rotate when shaking?


Yes, the entire round portion of the grate rotates back and forth when you shake it.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Visit Hitzer Stoves