Glenwood 118 Stove

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Aug 30, 2011 9:07 pm

Okay, the register plate, which is over the top of the bar grates is for the burning of wood. Get a poker and yank that thing out. The register plate is designed to just sit above the coal grates when you want to burn wood. I want you to listen to this next statement and let it soak in--You have one of the top coal stoves ever made. If you want to burn wood in this stove, you are wasting its potential. Even though it is a dual fuel stove in general, this unit was primarily designed to be a coal stove because it is equipped with an indirect back pipe. That back pipe makes all the difference in how the stove will perform. Your stove will heat your house very well for a small amount of coal per BTU produced.

But you have to get the stove back in operating condition. It is missing some critical pieces to make work properly for coal. More later.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: mastiffdude On: Tue Aug 30, 2011 9:53 pm

Steve it does have a flap cover on bottom door for the 2 triangle grates to poke thru.and only 2 ,the other 2 work in tandem with the 2 that poke through.Thanks for info. WSherrick thank you also for info and yes i knew this was a special stove from the moment i saw it.It was in a demolition place and i worked the price down over a period of 6 weeks.I just had to have it! waiting for you to tell me what all i need to burn coal thanks Jim
mastiffdude
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Stoker Early model
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: small cannon heater,1910
Baseburners & Antiques: Quick Time #5,1897
Coal Size/Type: rice,stove,nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska _Quick Time Base Burner
Stove/Furnace Model: Alaska Stoker ,Quick Time #5

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Aug 30, 2011 11:35 pm

The coal grates should be connected in pairs with gears so you can turn them. Are the gears present on your stove. On my Glenwood the gears are in the front just behind the dust cover. I think some of the Modern Oaks had the gears in the back. I don't see them in the pictures you posted. If they are there and intact, then the grates are fine.

The back pipe seems to be missing the cast iron top piece and the cast iron pipe collar that goes on the rear of the back pipe. These back pipes do not vent from the top but rather from the back. Does the exhaust pipe have a damper in it right behind the stove where the exit collar is? There are photos some where here on the Forum that I posted of a No 118 with the correct back pipe configuration. Maybe some one can find where I put them, I can't seem to find the photos.
The stove needs to be taken all apart and re done with new bolts and all the seams need to be resealed with new furnace cement. I just did that to mine over the past couple of months. You don't want to take any short cuts with your new found prize. You have a superb stove and you should treat it as such. I am looking forward to helping you with your project. There are many other helping hands here as well who will assist.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

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Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: SteveZee On: Wed Aug 31, 2011 7:47 am

William,

I was also wondering about that back pipe as I mentioned in my post to Jim. It doesn't look like the baffle and damper are in there although it's a bit hard to see in the photo. I have seen several specimens where the baffles and damper have been removed (for what reason I can't imagine?) and some where the backpipe itself is missing. You could certainly use the stove without it or with the backpipe sans internals but you loose some efficiency. You have in effect a direct vent oak stove.
While backpipes are easy to find (new), the baffles with damper are more difficult. It may be that Jim's has the pipe venting out the top like that because the internals are gone?

Jim,

Good news about the flap and the gears for the bar grates. Sounds like you are in fairly good shape there. Are the internals present in the backpipe or it's just an empty pipe?
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: mastiffdude On: Wed Aug 31, 2011 1:44 pm

Wsherrick the gears are entrained at the rear of stove each grate has a gear on its back end star pattern that engages the grate next to it so all 4 can be turned with one handle on the end of 1 grate.I dont think ill be taking it apart as it looks good and tight (must have been redone in later years).All it has is a straight pipe in rear going to bottom and connected to interior by a junction at back.I dont know what you mean by manifold and im not sure of what kind of damper. It doesnt have either. Hers a write up from one fo the bgger stove dealers in New England Maybe hes wrong?

This venerable antique stove, manufactured by the acclaimed Glenwood Company in the early 1900’s is equally as lovely as it is efficient. The stately Modern Glenwood Oak, takes an 18 inch stick of wood and can heat a large area all night long. Decorative nickel ribbing encircling the stove is not just pretty, it also helps to distribute the heat. Primary and secondary draft controls, located on the ash cleanout door at the base as well as on the front wood loading door, regulate the heat output. A cooklid is hidden beneath the dome at the top. The name of the stove Modern Glenwood Oak is proudly displayed above the two mica windows on the front

Well thanks and would love to see or hear about manifold and damper that it should have
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mastiffdude
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Stoker Early model
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: small cannon heater,1910
Baseburners & Antiques: Quick Time #5,1897
Coal Size/Type: rice,stove,nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska _Quick Time Base Burner
Stove/Furnace Model: Alaska Stoker ,Quick Time #5

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Aug 31, 2011 2:06 pm

Here is a picture of a Glenwood Modern Oak 118, just like yours. This is what the back pipe should look like. Click on the link below and the picture should pop up. The back pipe makes a huge difference in the efficiency of the stove.


http://nepacrossroads.com/download/file.php?id=21438&mode=view
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Aug 31, 2011 4:27 pm

SteveZee wrote:William,

I was also wondering about that back pipe as I mentioned in my post to Jim. It doesn't look like the baffle and damper are in there although it's a bit hard to see in the photo. I have seen several specimens where the baffles and damper have been removed (for what reason I can't imagine?) and some where the backpipe itself is missing. You could certainly use the stove without it or with the backpipe sans internals but you loose some efficiency. You have in effect a direct vent oak stove.
While backpipes are easy to find (new), the baffles with damper are more difficult. It may be that Jim's has the pipe venting out the top like that because the internals are gone?

Jim,

Good news about the flap and the gears for the bar grates. Sounds like you are in fairly good shape there. Are the internals present in the backpipe or it's just an empty pipe?


Steve,
There is no end to the reasons people do damaging things to something they don't understand. Sure the stove will work fine without the back pipe as far a wood burning appliance is concerned. As you will find with your Star Hearld, the back pipe makes a world of difference when burning coal and the efficiency of the stove. Somebody had this stove, it was just an old stove to them, they didn't know exactly what the back pipe was for, they probably found the internal damper a pain when burning wood, and ripped the whole thing out and there you are.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: mastiffdude On: Wed Aug 31, 2011 4:41 pm

Ok i see .The top of the back pipe is closed off.And there is some kind of damper inside that closed pipe.Could i use mine with the back pipe closed at top and add a 6" round receiver plate at back without having that damper setup? in
mastiffdude
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Stoker Early model
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: small cannon heater,1910
Baseburners & Antiques: Quick Time #5,1897
Coal Size/Type: rice,stove,nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska _Quick Time Base Burner
Stove/Furnace Model: Alaska Stoker ,Quick Time #5

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:27 pm

mastiffdude wrote:Ok i see .The top of the back pipe is closed off.And there is some kind of damper inside that closed pipe.Could i use mine with the back pipe closed at top and add a 6" round receiver plate at back without having that damper setup? in


The purpose of the indirect back pipe is to make a longer path for the exhaust gasses to follow before they are lost up the chimney forever. This gives the stove a whole lot of extra heating surface area as well as allowing more time for the exhaust to give up its heat into the room. It also allows for a greater control over the rate of burn as well because when the stove is set in indirect draft, it slows down the draft overall.

It works like this, when the damper is open the smoke just goes out of the stove then up the chimney like every other direct draft stove. When the damper is set to indirect draft, it sends the draft downward to the bottom of the pipe where it makes a U turn and then travels back up to exit at the top. The back pipe is really two pipes in one. There is a metal divider inside the pipe that splits the pipe into two sections to create the long smoke path.
call Emery at Antique Stove Hospital. Google, "Antique Stove Hospital," and you can find his web-site. He probably has or can have the parts made to put the back pipe back into its original condition. It is worth the extra effort to do this.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Sep 01, 2011 9:15 am

Jim,
I definately agree with William that its most advantageous to have that backpipe operating with the manifold and damper inside. Also I'd say that Emery is your best bet to find those missing innerds or a replacement backpipe. Antiquestovehospital is his website but you'd be better served to phone him as he's a very busy man at this time of year.

There is no sense in adding the top plate and outlet flange unless you can get the inside divider and damper. It will make no difference and still direct draft out of the pipe. Try and find those first or a complete backpipe with the internals.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: mastiffdude On: Thu Sep 01, 2011 9:53 pm

oK THANK YOU MEN.learned a lot.i will call emery.Big question,, I have an old alaska stoker,,,
I use it to heat all winter ,whole house.If i get the glenwood working like it should would you swap out the alaska and use the glenwood? :idea:
mastiffdude
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Stoker Early model
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: small cannon heater,1910
Baseburners & Antiques: Quick Time #5,1897
Coal Size/Type: rice,stove,nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska _Quick Time Base Burner
Stove/Furnace Model: Alaska Stoker ,Quick Time #5

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: wsherrick On: Thu Sep 01, 2011 11:43 pm

mastiffdude wrote:oK THANK YOU MEN.learned a lot.i will call emery.Big question,, I have an old alaska stoker,,,
I use it to heat all winter ,whole house.If i get the glenwood working like it should would you swap out the alaska and use the glenwood? :idea:


Eveyone here who has a Glenwood is completely satisfied, if not estatic, with their performamce, economy and reliability. I depend on mine for 100% of my heating needs and wouldn't think of ever getting another stove, unless it was another base heater of similiar design. These stoves are remarkable. If it were me, yes, I wouldn't think twice about swapping out stoves. If you don't like how the Glenwood works, then you could put the stoker back in. Honestly, once you learn how to run the Glenwood you will be quite happy with it, I'm pretty sure of that. The Glenwood can burn wood and various sizes of coal, doesn't need electricity, fans or forced draft to make it work. It will need attention at most twice a day, even less once you learn how operate it on warmer days. It will provide volumes of even, efficient, quiet heat for a minimum of coal used. The choice is up to you.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: SteveZee On: Fri Sep 02, 2011 7:52 am

Same here Jim, I would not hesitate either and fora few reasons. The first is the fact that it needs no electricity (if you have outages) and second, aesthetics wise I just feel they are a good looking stove. I've never used a stoker so I can't speak to the ease of operating one of those but it's hard for me to imagine that the radiant heat could compare? After all, in winter when things are a bit slower, people are always congregating round the stove. ;)
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: mastiffdude On: Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:17 pm

OK you almost got me sold on trading stoves..By the way ive been trying to get Emery unsuccesfully.What coal would the glenwood use? stove?Thanks Jim
mastiffdude
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Stoker Early model
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: small cannon heater,1910
Baseburners & Antiques: Quick Time #5,1897
Coal Size/Type: rice,stove,nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska _Quick Time Base Burner
Stove/Furnace Model: Alaska Stoker ,Quick Time #5

Re: Glenwood 118 Stove

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:22 pm

mastiffdude wrote:OK you almost got me sold on trading stoves..By the way ive been trying to get Emery unsuccesfully.What coal would the glenwood use? stove?Thanks Jim


If you can't get Emery, try Doug at Barnstable Stove Shop and try Ginger Creek Antique Stoves. The folks at Ginger Creek are friendly and helpful. Those parts should not be that hard to get.

I think once you use that Glenwood and you become comfortable with it you will wonder why you didn't get one of these years ago. Oh, to answer your question, you can burn either Nut size or Stove Size in it equally well. It depends on your preference. I use both in my Glenwood No 6 Base Heater. Your stove has an 18" fire pot so it's a big stove with a giant range of capacity, either will work.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Visit Hitzer Stoves