Look what I found...

Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: Rick 386 On: Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:02 am

crazy4coal wrote: Shotgun!



Exactly. however I strongly suggest the 12 ga. with full choke. Aim for the branch. Fire and then run like hell :out:

Then tomorrow night a stick with a rag soaked in kero should finish the project. And don't forget that even if you burn their little wings off, they can still sting. And if I remember correctly, hornets and yellow jackets sting and sting again. They do not lose their stinger after the first shot.



Rick

or you could locate some of these: Dragon's Breath shotgun shells. And don't forget to video it for us !!!!

Rick 386
 
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Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Sep 06, 2011 7:37 pm

You are correct. Hornets and Yellow Jackets are cousins. Yellow Jackets may be smaller but they are extremely aggresive and you can be swarmed by 100's of them in seconds. Plus if you run, they chase you. Yes, they are not like bees that die after they sting. Members of the Hornet family can sting repeatedly and live to sting again.
Anybody who has ever operated a bulldozer clearing land has been attacked by Yellow Jackets. Down South they can grow into huge hives. They don't like bulldozers very much.
wsherrick
 
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Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: VigIIPeaBurner On: Tue Sep 06, 2011 8:55 pm

If you have an allergic reaction to stings, call a pro. Never mess with them. Anaphylatic Shock can be deadly in a short amount of time.

Generally, leave'm alone, stay away during bad weather and give'm a little more room when it starts to turn fall. The really do eat a tremendous amount of insects. Baldfaced Hornets be thay. Yellow Jacket Hornets are more of a PIA in September 'cause they get all excited about sweets and meats this time of year - their last big picnic is right around the corner. They'll be gone after a few frosts. Most of the time the winter weather beats them up pretty bad. The only critter that makes it through the winter is a few queens that hatch out to start new colonies next spring. That is if the nest make it through in tact. If if falls to the ground, something generally will rip it apart to get to those few protein rich pupa that are waiting for spring.

I've had a few hives start on the garage door header. Got stung once when I closed the door to the old shop when a thunder storm was near - hurt like ... but not too bad. Other than that, they'd just look at me as I opend and closed the overhead door - they get use to patterns that aren't threats. They'd just fly around me. I've had hives in bushes that I mowed by all summer long and never even got chased. This isn't to say William's storys aren't on the mark - these hives were use to me but I'd never want to surprize one - never.

Hornet/wasp stingers aren't barbed so when they sting, they shoot a little venom into you. Again and again if you don't stop them. Painful. They run low after a few stings but keep on trying like the clip is still loaded. Honeybee stingers are barbed and they leave the venom sack behind hooked to the sting and the venom sack mussels pump a little at a time until either you scrape it out, scraping from under the sack to lift the sting/sack out or it pumps dry. Do it soon after you see the sting/sack but never pinch it - you just inject it. Honeybees die soon after they depart without their sting but Hornets/Wasps live to recharge and sting another day.

Again, it's a whole different story if you have an allergy to stings - it's a very serious event if you're allergic.

Signed,
former sideline beekeeper.
Last edited by VigIIPeaBurner on Tue Sep 06, 2011 9:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
VigIIPeaBurner
 
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Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: lsayre On: Tue Sep 06, 2011 9:08 pm

wsherrick wrote:
samhill wrote:If they aren't bothering anything I would leave it alone, soon either a storm or winter will take care of it. In the meantime wasps actually eat a lot of other insects & I'm pretty sure they don't return to the same nest.


Um, I hate to tell you that those are not Wasps. That's a giant HORNETS nest. Hornets are not your friends and you can die from just a few stings from them. Even if you don't die you might wish you had after they get done with you. Trust me on this one. Growing up in the Country teaches inquisitive little boys hard and painful lessons.


I watched a dog die from hornet stings when I was a child.
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Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: SMITTY On: Tue Sep 06, 2011 9:17 pm

Baldfaced ... or whitefaced as we call them here ... hornets are the worst of the worst. THE most aggressive stinging insect out there. They'll chase you for miles ... wait until your tired, then sting the *censored* out of you! Only thing worse is the african killer bees out west. Plus they hurt worse than any of them. My buddy just got nailed by 100 of them yesterday. I haven't been stung by one in probably 30 years ... but I remember it vividly.

Seems to be more bees around this year than I've ever seen. I've killed about 30 nests around the property over the past few months. All around the eves of the house, the barn, metal shed, and several underground. One was right in front of my house, less than 5' from the entrance. All of them I killed at 11pm with a can of bee killer. Works great. I'd use gas like we used to, but the well is pretty close to all of them. ;)

I just got stung for the first time in almost 20 years while weedwacking. Turns out I went over an underground yellow jackets nest (95% of all underground, & above ground hives at my place are yellow jackets). I got hit right opposite the elbow, right on a vein. Thought it was a rock kicked up, but then the pain got progressively worse ... so I turned around, & saw the swarm behind me.

John I'd cut that tree down & run! :D I'm not a fan of stinging insects, & they all must die. I'd kill that by any & all means possible. ;)
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SMITTY
 
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Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: wsherrick On: Fri Sep 09, 2011 1:52 pm

By the way, it is an old saying that the height of Hornet's nests are an indicator of how hard the Winter will be. This one is way up there, so let's see how accurate the Hornets are.
wsherrick
 
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Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: freetown fred On: Fri Sep 09, 2011 3:34 pm

Yea, I was thinking that when I saw the height on that one--30 feet-???? Holy crap, wait for that to happen & then snowshoe on up there & obliterate the little bastards :clap: toothy
wsherrick wrote:By the way, it is an old saying that the height of Hornet's nests are an indicator of how hard the Winter will be. This one is way up there, so let's see how accurate the Hornets are.
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Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: Dann757 On: Fri Sep 09, 2011 4:23 pm

They had a couple old nests on display in the office of Chenango Valley State Park this year. when we were in high school, one had got started right in the upper corner of my friend's garage door. The one they never used. It was pretty big, like melon size. My friend coated it with UNDERCOATING! Then he took gumout carb cleaner with the little red straw, and injected the nest over and over :shock: I think his father threw a brick at him for that one. They were Slovak. Nicest people in the world, they took me in and gave me a job in a steel yard in Jersey City, when I was down on my luck. But they had some very serious tempers!

I had to take out a nest of little yellow jacket types last week before the hurricane, took two cans of bug spray. Felt bad, I really don't think they were stinging insects.

Worst I ever got hit was powerwashing a doctor's house in Princeton. We were prepping for paint. I was just going around the house and stepped on a nest that was in a mulch bed. I was so not ready. They got me 23 times on the legs mostly. I'm tellin ya, a wave of pain came over my whole body I had to sit down :lol:
Passed quickly tho.

A hornet got in our gazebo this year, I shuffled it out with a broom and let it live. They're like giant yellow jackets. I'm just getting over the worst case of poison ivy I ever had, that was no fun either.
Dann757
 

Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: EarthWindandFire On: Fri Sep 09, 2011 6:40 pm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornets

Nasty little buggers!

They can sting you multiple times, unlike a typical honey bee and you have about 700 stinging adults inside that pumpkin of a hive.
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Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: Cap On: Wed Sep 14, 2011 8:21 pm

Some interesting stuff here I never knew about hornets. For that matter, I thought wasps & hornets were the same insect. Thanks.
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Re: Look what I found...

PostBy: VigIIPeaBurner On: Wed Sep 14, 2011 10:07 pm

EarthWindandFire wrote:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornets

Nasty little buggers!

They can sting you multiple times, unlike a typical honey bee and you have about 700 stinging adults inside that pumpkin of a hive.


Good thig honey bees are docile - there's 50,000 to 100,000 in a healthy colony during the summer!
VigIIPeaBurner
 
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