viking junior clean up

viking junior clean up

PostBy: levek On: Sat Sep 10, 2011 10:33 am

hello excuse me my bad english decause im a french canadien from montreal :)
hi have a viking junior number 250 whit a aero burner model f-afc whit a .75 jet
i open my viking for the fist time today '' a sale my home i have 4 years ''
Look inside how is normal and not normal ?
the person before my put 3 brik ordinary.
the stuff around the white circule is a isolant or is a deposit and a clean all aroud the circule ?
a make little circule white in one picture i have a hook here it is possible i put a baffle here or other piece ?

Stéphane
Image

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[imghttp://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d178/levek/fournaise3.jpg][/img]

last question, what the best stuff for scealing the door for closed all after
levek
 
Stove/Furnace Make: viking junior
Stove/Furnace Model: 250

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: freetown fred On: Sat Sep 10, 2011 5:10 pm

Welcome to the FORUM my friend. What I would do first is to get a wire brush & go over the whole stove & get at the obvious slop on it--around the doors,the doors, etc. Anything that looks like it will come off without smacking it w/ a hammer & chisel--that may come later. Have you ever used the stove or was she just stored?? I'm sure you will get alot of suggestions so be patient. Again, welcome to the FORUM. Remember, the only stupid questions are the ones we don't ask ;)
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: levek On: Sat Sep 10, 2011 7:42 pm

thank's :) is not in storage it work all winter , but is very hard on the fuel :shock:
levek
 
Stove/Furnace Make: viking junior
Stove/Furnace Model: 250


Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: I'm On Fire On: Sat Sep 10, 2011 7:51 pm

Welcome to the forums!! It's slow right now, but it'll be picking up very, very soon as people hop back on from the summer and get ready for the winter fun time.
I'm On Fire
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machines DS-1600 Hot Air Circulator

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: franco b On: Sat Sep 10, 2011 8:01 pm

That looks like a very small stove. How hot does the smoke pipe get? How long can you hold your hand on it?

From the picture it looks like there is very little heat absorbing surface. I don't think you will gain much adding a baffle.

More pictures and how much house are you heating?
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: homecomfort On: Sat Sep 10, 2011 9:31 pm

that is originally a coal fired designed iron boiler, upgraded with an oil burner and a combustion chamber. It will never be efficient by today's standard of almost $4 oil. too much mass to heat up not enough surface area. at .75 firing rate, pretty small already. Seal up the doors and anywhere else you can, where air leaks in, more expensive to operate. Use Kaowool strips or furnace cement available at heating supply . Aero burner is made in Canada, not the most efficient around, but not bad . run as little excess air, and high c02 without making smoke.
homecomfort
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Franco-Belge,+ Penn Stove
Stove/Furnace Model: Normandie, + Chubby

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: Tamecrow On: Mon Sep 12, 2011 3:39 pm

I have the same boiler, mine's a 400, which has one more section than yours. Great coal boiler, but terrible oil boiler. I've seen the oil converted ones run with everything from homemade baffles to the custom oil baffle's from Shafter Brothers in Montreal. They all have one thing in common, they burn copious amounts of oil. The only way to make it run efficiently would be to convert it back to coal, the fuel it was designed to burn. I heat 2000 sq ft with a Viking Junior 400 using cast iron rads and fed by a Will-Burt 30 stoker, and couldn't be happier with it's performance.
Tamecrow
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warden King Ltd.
Stove/Furnace Model: Viking Jr. Boiler/Will-Burt 30

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: Rob R. On: Mon Sep 12, 2011 4:03 pm

levek wrote:...but is very hard on the fuel :shock:


I bet it is. It was never designed to be fired on oil. Sadly there isn't much you can do to improve the efficiency. One of the old tricks is to put bricks in the large passages to help improve efficiency...and that trick has already been done. Keep the heat exchanger clean, and start saving for a different boiler.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: Wade On: Mon Sep 26, 2011 11:12 pm

I am looking for information on my viking Junior. It is a 1982 so its an older one for sure. I am trying to put it in my garage and run underground lines to my house. The supply and return is currently and 1 1/2 inches. I would like to drop this down to 1 inch or 3/4 but my run to the house is about 100 feet. I am not sure what this stove puts out for btu or how big an area it will heat. I am planning to burn wood and not coal because i am in a residential area. Any info on this stove would be great thanks in advance.

Wade
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Wade
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warnock Hersey
Stove/Furnace Model: Viking Junior wood and coal

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: blrman07 On: Tue Sep 27, 2011 7:00 am

If it says Warden King and not Crane, the puppy has some age on it. If it ain't leaking, it's good. It is a standard construction cast iron boiler. Like it has in earlier posts, if it's been converted to oil put it back to coal because it will use oil like your pouring it on the ground.

Enjoy the information below from http://www.lib.uwo.ca/programs/companyi ... nking.html

Canadian Centennial Companies Logo

Warden King was 29 years old when, in 1852, he read in the Montreal Transcript and Commercial Advertiser an ad that said, "By auction 'he whole of the St. Mary Foundry tools and stock will be sold on the 30th June . . . the whole of the stock-in-trade of the above establishment . . . And, immediately after the above Sale, will be Sold a lease of the foundry and shops, for the Term of Three or Five years."

St. Mary's foundry in old MontrealWarden King and his friend George Rogers, a foreman at the St. Mary Foundry, decided to seize the opportunity. Six weeks later the firm of Rogers and King was born.

In 1855, as the lease to the foundry was running out, Warden King purchased building lots for 100 pounds in the "St. Lawrence suburb". This modest advertisement appeared in the Montreal Directory of 1856-57: "Rogers & King have Removed Their Foundry to No. 85 Craig Street Where All Kinds of Castings are done At Reasonble Prices."

The young company specialized in the potash trade, turning out heavy, cast-iron potash kettles, 45-gallon sugar coolers for farmers making maple syrup, cast-iron railings for cemeteries and private estates, and circular iron stairs. Since the potash trade was conducted almost exclusively by Rogers & King, their name became widely known.

Rogers & King began experimenting in boilers. By 1866, with the help of one of their employees, Archibald Spence, they were ready to market their first hot water heater, the Beehive. This was followed by the Gem and, in 1874, Spence's Hot Water Boiler. The Warden King slogan, "The Grand Old Name In Heating", was inspired by these years of pioneering.

In 1870 George Rogers retired and sold out his Interest in the business. The name Rogers & King survived until 1887 when it was changed to Warden King. At about that time Mr. King's young son, James Cochrane King, went into the foundry to learn the moulder's craft, as his father had done before him.

Warden King successfully weathered the economic storms of the time, and 1886 marks a memorable date in their story: a new domestic boiler was patented, the "Daisy". Thousands were thus introduced to the comforts of central heating. The advertising was calculated to allay the fears of those to whom the word boiler meant a threat. "Hot water is the only absolutely safe system," they announced, "it is as harmless as the tea kettle on the kitchen stove." By 1904, thousands of "Daisies" were in use in Canada, the United States, Great Britain, Germany, France, Australia, and South Africa. More than 45,000 of these boilers, some converted to oil, still give dependable service today.

In 1888 the name of the firm became Warden King & Son. It was turning out boilers, soil pipe and fittings, feed boxes for horses, wrought iron stall guards, whip racks, hitching posts, dumb waiters, and coil screens for radiators.

Warden King died in 1895 at the age of 72. The old name of the firm remained until 1901 when it obtained a Quebec Charter under the name Warden King & Son Ltd. In 1907, a federal charter was obtained under the name Warden King Ltd., with James Cochrane King as president.

In the early 1900's, the new president bought land in the growing industrial suburb of Maisonneuve. By 1907 the move was completed. The making of soil pipe and fittings was the "bread and butter" of the business. They made new refinements and introduced the "continuous pouring process."

Minor depressions throughout the years gave James Cochrane King many troubles. After much thought, and his own lack of a son to take some of the responsibility, King discussed the future of his business with J. Austin Murphy, vice-president of Crane Limited. This led, in 1926, to the purchase of the company by Crane Limited. Warden King Ltd. retained its name and its identity, and concentrated its production in boilers, soil pipe and fittings, and radiators.
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Baseburners & Antiques: rebuilding a 1906 March Brownback Double Heater, using a UMCO 1920's Pot Belly stove in the church
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: Wade On: Tue Sep 27, 2011 7:44 am

Hey thanks for the info. It has not been converted and has seen very little fire in its life time. The boiler just has Warden King Limited on it. I am trying to find out what this unit puts out for BTU. Would anyone have any idea?

Thanks
Wade
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warnock Hersey
Stove/Furnace Model: Viking Junior wood and coal

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: Rob R. On: Tue Sep 27, 2011 8:12 am

That information plate doesn't say anything about btu output? How big is the firebox and grate area?

Wade wrote:I am planning to burn wood and not coal because i am in a residential area.


That doesn't make much sense to me. Firewood is usually scarce & expensive in residential areas, and anthracite burns with no smoke...more than likely no one would even know if you were burning anthracite.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: Wade On: Tue Sep 27, 2011 1:17 pm

Hey Again
Wood is not scarce in my area that is for sure, but coal is. The plate on the front of my boiler does not say anything about BTU"s but the dimensions of the burner box are 29" high by 17 1/2 " wide and 24" deep. If that helps anyone to figure out the Btu's I would appreciate it for sure. Also do you think it would mater if I was to run 1" inch supply and return for the distance of 100 feet. Opinion please and thank you.

Wade
Wade
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Warnock Hersey
Stove/Furnace Model: Viking Junior wood and coal

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: blrman07 On: Wed Sep 28, 2011 7:55 am

Can you post a photo with all three doors open? I am not seeing how this beast is fired.
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Baseburners & Antiques: rebuilding a 1906 March Brownback Double Heater, using a UMCO 1920's Pot Belly stove in the church
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: viking junior clean up

PostBy: franco b On: Wed Sep 28, 2011 4:59 pm

Wade wrote:Also do you think it would mater if I was to run 1" inch supply and return for the distance of 100 feet. Opinion please and thank you.


The size of the pipe will depend on the ability of the circulator to push an adequate amount of water.

Try the web sites of Bell & Gosset and Taco. There will be tables to figure what you need. I assume you will insulate the pipes.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea