outside combustion air

outside combustion air

PostBy: gambler On: Wed Oct 31, 2007 2:08 pm

How many of you use outside combustion air for your stokers?
gambler
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer

PostBy: Matthaus On: Wed Oct 31, 2007 2:29 pm

Not yet, I bought all the pipe last year at the same time as the stove install. Still waiting to get the time, probably some time this winter it will go in! :lol:
Matthaus
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110 Dual Fuel, natural gas
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Lil' Heater (rental house)
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Buckwheat Anthracite

PostBy: stokerstove On: Wed Oct 31, 2007 4:13 pm

I use outside air for combustion. Last year was the first. I ran about 20' of 4" flexible hose from a window to the combustion blower and it worked well. This year I cut thru the siding above the stove, installed a hooded vent w/ a screen and I'm only using 10' of hose. Haven't started the stove yet to try it out....soon though!
stokerstove
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Kodiak Stokerstove 1

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PostBy: spc On: Wed Oct 31, 2007 4:43 pm

What is the advantage of using outside air for combustion?
spc
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer

PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed Oct 31, 2007 4:51 pm

Hi spc. The air that is used for combustion and goes up the chimney has to come from somewhere. If the combustion fan pulls from the house without an outside vent, then the house is under a slight vacuum.

The slight vacuum pulls in cold outside air through cracks around doors, windows, foundations etc. This cold air mixes with the air in the house, cooling it and creating cold drafts.

If you have a newer or really tight house with good windows, sealed doors etc, then when the stove is running it has to pull pretty hard to get combustion air. If a bathroom vent fan, a clothes dryer or kitchen vent fan is turned on, then the combustion fan in the stove may not be able to provide enough air for the fire, or worse the airflow in the chimney may reverse, and fumes get into the house.

So when you provide a small duct from the outside to the inlet of the combustion fan, you provide a decicated source of outside air that does not cool the house, create drafts, or has to compete against other exhaust fans.

Hope this makes sense.

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

PostBy: spc On: Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:12 pm

Thanks Greg, I have a LL Poineer on order & wonder if this will be needed? The room where the stove is go is a well insulated addition but the rest of the house has solid brick walls, 3 courses thick, but all the windows are double pane.
spc
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer

PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed Oct 31, 2007 7:40 pm

I would guess that 99% of stoves do not use a dedicated outside air duct. But it is a nice thing to add to your stove installation if you have time and access to a place to put an outside vent. And a way to run a duct to behind the stove.

The biggest gain in my mind is the reduction of drafts in the house.

Greg L

.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

PostBy: bksaun On: Wed Oct 31, 2007 8:50 pm

I have used it With my Alaska Channing for 2 years now. Works fine, plus I am not sucking heated air out of my house. If I go outside and hold my hand over the intake, it is suprising how much air is actually moving through the pipe.

BK
bksaun
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Hybrid, Gentleman Janitor GJ-6RSU/ EFM 700
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 503
Coal Size/Type: Pea Stoker/Bit, Pea or Nut Anthracite
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer/ EFM-Gentleman Janitor
Stove/Furnace Model: 503 Insert/ 700/GJ-62

PostBy: gambler On: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:56 pm

spc wrote:What is the advantage of using outside air for combustion?


As Greg stated it does not draw cold air into the house from all of the little cracks and openings but I also feel that it will create a better burn because as air gets colder and denser it holds more oxygen and as you give a fire more oxygen it gives a better more complete burn. Just a thought that I have and I don't have any proof that this is true.
gambler
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer

PostBy: JeepJunky On: Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:02 pm

Any ideas on how to mount a inlet pipe to a Harman Magnum Stoker? My cumbustion fan has a small plate about half covering it. The service guy said that plate had somthing to do with the draft?? Can I remove that plate? If so I'm sre I could mount some type of flange.
JeepJunky
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harmon Magnum Stoker

PostBy: Matthaus On: Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:05 pm

JeepJunky, don't remove the plate, you will over pressurize the stove.

I found a slick little flange at Lowes in the fireplace accessories section that will screw right into the sheet metal on the combustion fan. The flange can go over the plate. Just make sure you don't put any screws into the squirrel cage, could be kinda noisy! :lol:
Matthaus
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110 Dual Fuel, natural gas
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Lil' Heater (rental house)
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Buckwheat Anthracite

PostBy: Ed.A On: Fri Nov 02, 2007 7:19 am

bksaun wrote:I have used it With my Alaska Channing for 2 years now. Works fine, plus I am not sucking heated air out of my house. If I go outside and hold my hand over the intake, it is suprising how much air is actually moving through the pipe.

BK


BK, do you have pics of your set-up?
I have an air tube already in place, it's actually my old outlet for my exhaust fan in the dart room for when I used to smoke. I can just disconnect that hose ( 4" flex) and bring it 'round to the stove. I'm going to reverse the poliarty on the exhaust fan in place to blow hot air from the stove in the room now instead.

Any info would be great, thanks.
Ed.A
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Channing III/ '94 Stoker II
Coal Size/Type: Rice

PostBy: heatwithcoal On: Fri Nov 02, 2007 5:38 pm

I have my Magnum setup to outside air. I am sharing my house with a pellet stove upstairs and the magnum in the basement, both have fresh air. Both stoves burn bright and if you think about it, fire loves cold dense, oxygen rich air. Before i installed the fresh air inlet on the pellet stove i could feel cold air moving across the living room floor from the top of the basement stairs towards thepellet stove. I do not feel that anymore.
Also in the past I could smell a sulfur odor from my old coal stove until I installed the outside air inlet. I just went ahead an hooked up this inlet when I got the Magnum.

My wife is out with the camera now but I will post a picture when she gets back.
heatwithcoal
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: AK-110
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: AK-110

Re: outside combustion air

PostBy: ginski On: Mon Nov 05, 2007 3:45 am

i also have had intentions of using outside combustion air for my mag since last season, but the job & kids put a damper on these projects.

since i already have 2" pvc running thru the wall behind the stove (which my propane furnace used to power vent), it should be a snap.

it's worth noting that when i removed the pvc cap from the outside line, cold air was rushing in thru the 2" pipe (the combustion blower was creating a negative pressure in the basement) as greg/lsfarm had mentioned. i unplugged the combustion blower for a couple of minutes and the air virtually died down to nothing coming thru the pipe from the outside. good insight/information greg!

perhaps thursday or definately friday i'll hook it up and tell you what my findings are.

tom
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ginski
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman
Stove/Furnace Model: magnum stoker

Re: outside combustion air

PostBy: jimbo970 On: Mon Nov 05, 2007 9:06 pm

Hey Ginski ,

I would def like to know what you find out when you hook up to fresh air. I noticed from your pic, your stove is in a basement area with cinder walls. Are you ducting the stove to upstairs and if so how many outlets are you connecting to and distance. Last year I ran 1 6" duct to upstairs about 11' run. This year I move stove to other side of wall and want to run 2 ducts after coming off of a T using 6" then after T convert to 4" to upstairs. I am thinking that there should not be a problem doing this.

Any input before I do this from experience would be appreciated.

Jimbo
jimbo970
 

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