Is this Bituminous coal?

Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: NJJoe On: Sun Oct 23, 2011 2:17 pm

Hello, I ran into a deal, an offer for me to pick up some free coal. The homeowner, whose basement it is in, does not know the quality or type it is. Perhaps someone here could help me out please? All she knows it that it is "low-grade" as told to her by someone else who came by to pick some up. Anybody?
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NJJoe
 

Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: david78 On: Sun Oct 23, 2011 2:22 pm

Looks like bit to me.
david78
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Fuller & Warren Splendid Oak 27
Coal Size/Type: Nut

Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: mdtatter On: Sun Oct 23, 2011 5:16 pm

Around my area of Western Md, "low grade" is redstone -- a high sulfur bituminous coal. To me your sample looks nice and lumpy, which is typically a good sign around my locale. Depends on your area, though. If you're in NJ, I'd almost believe it might be anthracite. Light a match and hold it at the sharp edge of a lump. Take a whiff. If it smells pretty good, you've got the best. Also, shatter a piece and bounce some little chunks on a sidewalk. If it clatters like gravel, it's anthracite. If you can draw nice thick lines on the sidewalk like with chalk, it's more likely bituminous.

Mdtatter
mdtatter
 
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Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: NJJoe On: Sun Oct 23, 2011 6:42 pm

Thanks mdtatter for the tips. I'm supposed to go over and look at this coal soon. The locale is Massachusetts.
NJJoe
 

Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: 2001Sierra On: Sun Oct 23, 2011 8:27 pm

Not shiney I suspect Bit also.
2001Sierra
 
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Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: Duengeon master On: Sun Oct 23, 2011 10:32 pm

It looks like cannel coal to me.
Duengeon master
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harmon Mark III
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite pea and nut mix. Bituminous lump

Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: NJJoe On: Sun Oct 23, 2011 11:35 pm

Duengeon master wrote:It looks like cannel coal to me.


I really hope so. if it is cannel coal, then I plan to use this in an outside burn, a firepit setup for the fall.
NJJoe
 

Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: Berlin On: Mon Oct 24, 2011 12:00 am

That coal is not could go either way. There's no way to tell without handling it or, as was mentioned, taking a lighter to a small sharp end of one of the pieces for about 30 seconds. If the corner of the coal catches fire while the lighter is under it and burns bright reddish orange, you have bituminous or cannel. Cannel it might be if it has a dull grey waxy appearance even when dusted off. I would recommend against burning cannel in a firepit but, you can try it. Cannel is best for a fireplace indoors.
Berlin
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
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Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: NJJoe On: Tue Oct 25, 2011 11:22 am

I went to visit the coal yesterday and the lady was nice enough for me to inspect and get a feel on what I will be hauling out of her basement. I'm not sure of the exact differences between Bit and Cannel coal, but one thing for sure is that it did not light the easiest. I picked a sharp corner, relatively thin and lit it with a lighter. Had to hold the lighter there for 30 seconds or so before the corner of the coal ignited on its on. Extinguished itself after a few seconds and it smelled like bit coal (I have other bit coal from a steam locomotive to compare it to and the smell was identical), def that sulfur bit coal smell. Not bad but definitely there. (Does cannel coal have a bit like smell?)

It was hard to break, I could even not break it by slamming it on the ground. It did not feel dense like gravel, I would say, one thing for sure that this is NOT anthracite. Not glassy, just a dull grayish black with some shiny waxy deposits on it. I was able to use it as chalk and mark up a concrete floor when I drew with it. I figure I can take it off of her hands anyway...it is difficult to get bit coal up here in New England and I can always use it in conjunction with an outdoor wood fire or for camping purposes. A few pounds of coal thrown in an open wood fire could go a long way in extending the fire a bit and is cheaper and cleaner than hauling firewood in the car. Even if not cannel coal, I could find some use for it in those ways.
NJJoe
 

Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: Berlin On: Tue Oct 25, 2011 1:57 pm

after taking a second look, it appears to be cannel. it is similar to bit coal with the volatiles and carbon percentage switched (60% volatile vs. bituminous 30%/60% carbon)

That coal is hard to find and would be excellent for a fireplace, i'd hate to waste it on an outdoor firepit.
Berlin
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal

Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: NJJoe On: Tue Oct 25, 2011 2:55 pm

Berlin wrote:That coal is hard to find and would be excellent for a fireplace, i'd hate to waste it on an outdoor firepit.


Berlin:
Any reason why this coal would not work or is a bad idea in a firepit or campfire? I'd like to use it to go camping. Hauling firewood is such a pain as well as foraging for good logs in the woods. Having a load of easy to light cannel coal in the trunk of a car for a firepit/campfire seems to be an easier and more convenient fuel than logs.
NJJoe
 

Re: Is this Bituminous coal?

PostBy: steamup On: Wed Oct 26, 2011 9:34 am

NJJoe wrote:
Berlin wrote:That coal is hard to find and would be excellent for a fireplace, i'd hate to waste it on an outdoor firepit.


Berlin:
Any reason why this coal would not work or is a bad idea in a firepit or campfire? I'd like to use it to go camping. Hauling firewood is such a pain as well as foraging for good logs in the woods. Having a load of easy to light cannel coal in the trunk of a car for a firepit/campfire seems to be an easier and more convenient fuel than logs.



And you don't have to worry about some invasive instect such as the emerald ash borer or asian long horned beetle.

Could make your marshmellows tast funny however.
steamup
 
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