my new stove

Re: my new stove

PostBy: ramblerboy2 On: Wed Nov 16, 2011 12:08 am

Thanks for everyone's advice and encouragement. I assume that the stove will end up sitting quite a ways further out from the fireplace than it is standing in that picture, unless I want to install heat shields which would be a bit of a problem aesthetically. I don't really want to cover up the mantelpiece. We'll see. I did a lot of research on stoves before buying this one, so I feel pretty well prepared for both the good and the bad of this stove. Glad that Franco_B agrees that the stove should work well for my intended purpose.

Will need to get a lot of chimney repairs made before I can use the stove, so I am hoping it stays warm so I can get a mason out to repair/repoint/reline as necessary to make sure I have a safe chimney. Been meaning to do that anyway. May see about having vermiculite poured round the tile to insulate to help with draft. I have never burned anything in this fireplace so I have no idea what the draft is like.
ramblerboy2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac MCK 508
Other Heating: Embassy Ambassador BMS natural gas boiler

Re: my new stove

PostBy: freetown fred On: Wed Nov 16, 2011 8:50 am

Light up a piece of newspaper & hold it in the fireplace with the smoke hole damper open--that'll give you an idea of how she's drawing
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: my new stove

PostBy: franco b On: Wed Nov 16, 2011 2:55 pm

Fred's advice is good. If the draft seems good I would resist installing a liner. Buy 5 inch galvanized smoke pipe from a plumbing supply which is cheaper and better than black pipe, also easier to work with. Go straight back to the bull or center opening of a tee. Buy a plug for the bottom opening to act as a clean out. Then go up to the chimney with two 2 ft sections. If you are lucky it will go through the damper opening with the damper plate removed. Fill in the open space by stuffing fiberglass un-faced insulation into the gaps.

If it does not work you will have lost most of what you have spent for material but I think it worth the gamble to avoid the expense and hassle of a lining.

If you do need a lining then look up Olympia which sells liners with a better quality stainless for coal.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

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Re: my new stove

PostBy: ramblerboy2 On: Thu Nov 17, 2011 12:07 am

That chimney is pretty badly deteriorated. Pieces of clay liner fell down. Outside needs repointing badly and the top has lost some bricks, so I need to get some major chimney work done anyway. Thankfully this little stove was quite inexpensive (less than what I tend to see well used stoves sell for) so I am a bit ahead at the moment, and that chimney has been on the short list of $$$ repairs for a few years. Old houses keep your checkbook open!
ramblerboy2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac MCK 508
Other Heating: Embassy Ambassador BMS natural gas boiler

Re: my new stove

PostBy: musikfan6 On: Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:00 am

I'm readin the post about how to install a less expensive liner. I kinda wish that I would have looked at other options myself. I have a 20 foot stainless steel flexible liner from Chimney Depot in Scranton PA. They are super nice people to deal with and they have excellent customer service. However, my bill for my liner with the accessories ended up being about $800.00. Ouch!! But my flue pathway is curved and I had no other option. If I could have done it with the 2 foot sections, I would have!
musikfan6
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Franco Belge
Stove/Furnace Model: 1475

Re: my new stove

PostBy: ramblerboy2 On: Fri Sep 27, 2013 12:55 pm

Reviving an old post:

I never got around to getting the stove installed. Old house eats all available funds! This summer my roofer told me I needed to get on doing something about the chimneys, and a month or so later one of them actually leaked badly into the house during a storm. So I called out a mason and had two chimneys rebuilt from the roofline up and the third chimney was repointed. $$$$.

Anyway, today I got curious and used the camera on my phone to snap some pictures up the chimney which I was planning to use for the stove.

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So the flue looks pretty good; the mason said there was something collapsed in the chimney but this looks ok.

This weird damper is at the bottom: feels very sturdy so will be a job to get it out:

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I took the shot up the flue by putting the lens and flash up in the little crevice between the damper and the fireplace back (sorta) visible on the upper left of the photo. I've never seen a damper like this and am not sure what it's for. Looks like it slides open leaving open slots like a ventilator. This fireplace and flue definitely don't look like they were designed to use as a regular fireplace. There is no smoke shelf and the fireplace is quite small.

So looking up this flue I'm wondering if I should bother with any kind of lining at all. Since it looks like a nice straight shot down I may see if the mason can slide terracotta liners down it. This is not a terribly tall chimney; I think it's 16 feet from the top of the fireplace to the top of the chimney. It's a three flue chimney but I only plan to use this one.

I burned a piece of newspaper in the fireplace and after a moment it did seem to suck up the smoke and flame into the crack between the back and the damper.
ramblerboy2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac MCK 508
Other Heating: Embassy Ambassador BMS natural gas boiler

Re: my new stove

PostBy: stovepipemike On: Sat Sep 28, 2013 8:26 am

That is an impressive piece of chimney construction,tip of the hat to the original mason.There is a relationship between the size [volume],the height of a chimney and the appliance's ability to create enough heat to warm the chimney thoroughly to get a steady good draft. I have a Surdiac Southport [similar in appearance to yours but longer] and that stove design with the rear heat exchange chamber does not send very much heat up the chimney. Do yourself a favor and discuss the situation with someone knowledgeable at a liner manufacturer company before you spend penny one.Draft is critical to proper working of this stove if it has the revertible flue gas chamber [exchanger]on the back like mine.The stove is a great stove, providing you give it what is needed to meet the design criteria of the draft. One more item,if yours has the cleanout pockets in the lower portion of the rear heat exchanger,be aware that should the wing nuts on that cleanout door get corroded on the stud [from the acids], you will turn the square shank stud in the thin enameled sheet metal.You will not like that and you will not be able to clean out the flyash easily. Clean them out often and keep the wingnuts working smoothly.You have a great stove and a beautiful place to display and enjoy it. Just my $.02 worth . Mike
stovepipemike
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: KAA-2

Re: my new stove

PostBy: dcrane On: Sat Sep 28, 2013 9:27 am

rip that damper out (its gotta be done)... here a vid of a pretty ingenious method of obtaining a terra cotta liner...
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: my new stove

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Sun Sep 29, 2013 9:03 pm

Second time I've seen someone curious about the damper in a old fireplace. As far as I know thier the original dampers. All three of my original untouched fireplaces have the slide dampers. Circa 1880. Keeps a little more of the heat in the room. Hah. You can either flip the whole assembly up or slide it sideways. To remove you just flip it up and remove it from the locating tabs. Although you might have to remove the whole assembly and some bricks to get a liner through the fireplace throat. Matt
DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40, Stanley Argand No. 30, Glenwood Modern Oak 114, Stanley Argand No. 20 missing parts.
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite. Stove and nut size.
Other Heating: Oil hot water.

Re: my new stove

PostBy: dcrane On: Sun Sep 29, 2013 10:02 pm

DePippo79 wrote:Second time I've seen someone curious about the damper in a old fireplace. As far as I know thier the original dampers. All three of my original untouched fireplaces have the slide dampers. Circa 1880. Keeps a little more of the heat in the room. Hah. You can either flip the whole assembly up or slide it sideways. To remove you just flip it up and remove it from the locating tabs. Although you might have to remove the whole assembly and some bricks to get a liner through the fireplace throat. Matt


You don't need the liner to go through the fireplace throat so much as you need to get your stove pipe up through the throat of that damper (and that damper looks awfully narrow :cry: ), having a strait shot up certainly helps this cause, imagine having to get through a damper opening like that and then curve over >>>> and then up^^^^ :shock:

Open that damper and see if a 6" stove pipe can get through it nice (I wouldn't mind a lil' bending of it as long as it can get up into the chimney at least 3-4 feet), ideally that pipe would make it into a nice 8" terra cotta liner :punk: (mainly because of the C0 fears of an unlined chimney).
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

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