New to the coal world and need a little direction

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: dlj On: Thu Nov 24, 2011 12:48 pm

Smokeyja wrote:I would think you could weld 316Ti ok considering the Ti content is usually only .5% but it might change the properties at the weld and cause failure there first. That would be my guess. Now Titanium would be really cool to use but talk about cost! We also used Hastalloy in the AF on the F16 after burner het shields and that metal was a bear to weld and to grind but I am sure that would hold up amazing as a glue ;) not to mention a great conversation starter haha.


I'm sure you can weld it, it's the question of what happens at the weld. One major problem, is where do you get 316Ti welding rod? You'd probably have to use a 316L rod so what happens where the two materials meet in that weld? I don't know, but I'd sure research it before doing it...

Hastalloy is good stuff... Make a chimney out of that, it would outlast your building! LOL

Smokeyja wrote:I am interested to see the true longevity of this 316Ti and I am going to run a camera I have down the liner every year and see how things hold up. It would be cool to report to this site my findings every year. It is so hard to find accurate information on products these days as many people have different experiences and some companies will obviously stretch the truth to sell a product, especially for more money. But in the case of the company I am dealing with they are putting their money where their mouth is. Chimney people are wierd in VA I had one qoute that wanted 5000$ to reline my chimney and use Portland mortar and Portland based filler and they totally didn't know what they were talking about regarding the use of Portland in a lime mortar chimney... If I didn't know better they would have destroyed my chimney! It's scary how some companies are allowed to practice!


The 316Ti should work just fine. It's a good alloy. I'm sure the way they are putting it together will work out well for you. If I were building chimneys as a contractor, I wouldn't put in steel without lots of not just fine print but bold print! :D

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: CapeCoaler On: Thu Nov 24, 2011 12:55 pm

Start with the Warm Morning...
More air tight and will have longer burn times...
It will burn either hard or soft coal...
CapeCoaler
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Thu Nov 24, 2011 2:19 pm

Here are some more photos of the projects:

Warm morning 414A when I bought it from the salvage yard for $90
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After restoring it
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Pearl cannon heater before restoring it. It came out of the woods in West Virginia when a friend stumbled upon it buried under leaves and vines when his folks bought a bit of land in WV. I traded some website work to get a hold of this stove.
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After
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here is the firepot I want to line it with refractory. If anyone has any experience with that, please chime in.
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Here is the fireplace when I bought my house two years ago
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After I pulled the metal facing off, and look I found a flue!
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During the demo. I pulled the facing off brick by brick with a brick hammer. The previous owners had let someone face the chimney with some crap looking brick and Portland mortar and it was separating from the wall and needed to go.
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After starting to wall it in and the flue and liner come next.
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Neither of these stoves are the ones I will end up with in this room but for now they will do. I have become addicted to wood/coal stoves since I started restoration on my first stove that I bought.
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I just need to talk my wife into buying a cook stove to put in the kitchen :) if not I'll put it in my shop.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

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Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Nov 24, 2011 3:18 pm

You'll love a cookstove. The Glenwood 208 C in my avatar is from 1909 and has been in this house since it was new. Twenty some years ago I found it in pieces in the barn, went through it completely and set it up with wood grates and liners. Now it's been converted to coal since last winters end and its a joy to have and use. They make allot of heat due to the size and are great for baking and slowcooking in particular. I wouldn't be without mine.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: titleist1 On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 8:56 am

SteveZee wrote:Wow, 1993 is pretty good Bob! Do you wash it down with soda at the end of the season or do anything special? That's going on 20 years and is quite impressive. I guess allot of it must be individual to the specific situation?
PS: Happy Thanks giving everybody! Eat up!


I wish the internet resources and this forum was around here in '92 so I could have researched a little more effectively and just went with a masonry chimney!!
I have never washed it down with baking soda. I brush it at the end of the season and leave the cap off the bottom T where it attaches to the thimble. I have never got much ash out of it when brushing it down, it is only about 20' tall since it is on a ranch house. I disconnect the inside flue pipe and stuff plastic bags in that end to keep air from flowing into the basement. Maybe the airflow through the pipe from bottom to top (or vice versa) keeps it dry enough in the summer to prevent the excessive corrosion? I brush it again at the beginning of the season just to make sure no critters took up residence over the summer.

It has lasted long enough for me that last winter when installing the stoker in the garage workshop I went with a SS chimney from Olympia. Although one of the reasons there was not being sure that the stoker wouldn't be moved to a different spot some time later. If I get 20 years out of that I'll be happy.
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 2:13 pm

Image

The chimney people came back today and finished up the job... It just dawned on me, perlite is the same stuff I use when planting saplings. Gonna be burning tonight :)
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: freetown fred On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 2:32 pm

By God, I hope so. ;) I musta missed it, you gonna hook up the warm morning or that cute way less functional who-za-ma-wotz??
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 3:05 pm

freetown fred wrote:By God, I hope so. ;) I musta missed it, you gonna hook up the warm morning or that cute way less functional who-za-ma-wotz??


I'm going to hook up the pearl cannon heater. I just finished putting another coat of polish on it today. Eventually I will find another coal stove to put in there but for now this should work great. I need to find some refractory mortar first though. I want to line the firepot with it. The little parlour stove is going upstairs in one of the bedrooms to burn in if ever needed or just for fun. It's neat to watch it burn through the mica. The warm morning was going to burn in the kitchen but I need to build a heat shield on the wall for it to pass code first. If I don't hook it up there it's going to be a Heater in the blacksmith shop.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 4:12 pm

Well I had forgotten about this but my hearth needs to be extended to support the cannon heater so the warm morning will be the heater for now.

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Do you guys suggest anything other than bricking out the hearth or I have hear people laying down a steel plate.
Last edited by Smokeyja on Fri Nov 25, 2011 4:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: franco b On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 4:16 pm

Rutland makes castable refractory. The only time I used a similar product I made a sheet metal form inside the fire pot and a piece of sheet metal over the grate. I have since learned on this forum that a better way is to use a stiff cardboard for the mold and just let it burn away.

http://www.rutland.com/productinfo/castable-refractory-cement.html
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: franco b On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 4:23 pm

freetown fred wrote:By God, I hope so. ;) I musta missed it, you gonna hook up the warm morning or that cute way less functional who-za-ma-wotz??

I know it probably is your military training , but not everyone understands technical terms
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 4:27 pm

franco b wrote:Rutland makes castable refractory. The only time I used a similar product I made a sheet metal form inside the fire pot and a piece of sheet metal over the grate. I have since learned on this forum that a better way is to use a stiff cardboard for the mold and just let it burn away.

http://www.rutland.com/productinfo/castable-refractory-cement.html
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.


Now exactly how do you use the cardboard for a mold? Cover the grate only with it or cover the entire firepot with it? Or do you smear the stuff right on the sides of the cast iron and use the cardboard on the bottom to keep it from the grate?
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: freetown fred On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 5:25 pm

The WM looks like she belongs right there my friend. :)
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: grizzly2 On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 6:48 pm

:nice: Very interesting. Also some nice stove restoration smokey :)
grizzly2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 30 - 95
Coal Size/Type: pea and nut/ anthracite
Other Heating: Jotul #3 wood stove in garage. Oil backup in house. Electric backup in house.

Re: New to the coal world and need a little direction

PostBy: franco b On: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:50 pm

Smokeyja wrote:
franco b wrote:Rutland makes castable refractory. The only time I used a similar product I made a sheet metal form inside the fire pot and a piece of sheet metal over the grate. I have since learned on this forum that a better way is to use a stiff cardboard for the mold and just let it burn away.

http://www.rutland.com/productinfo/castable-refractory-cement.html
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.


Now exactly how do you use the cardboard for a mold? Cover the grate only with it or cover the entire firepot with it? Or do you smear the stuff right on the sides of the cast iron and use the cardboard on the bottom to keep it from the grate?

You make a cone shaped piece that is the same taper as the fire pot and smaller by the thickness you want the wall of refractory. Stand this on another piece that covers the grate. Slowly and uniformly add the cement so it stays centered. If you are skilled in figuring you can lay it out in the flat and hold it together with an overlap with tape. Or you can do as I did and just form the cone and cut off the top and bottom to be level. As I said I used metal and fastened it from the inside with a few sheet metal screws. The bottom I made in two pieces in order to get it out when the cement hardened. I don't know the best paper board to use, I imagine a heavy piece like that used for posters. It has to be strong enough to not buckle from the cement. Mix the cement so it is not too watery, use care so it is just workable and work it around the mold.

Steve Zee used a refractory with the consistency of clay that could be pounded in place. It looked very neat.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

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