Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:39 am

PJT wrote:Nortcan take a gander at this:
http://books.google.com/books?id=RDC80l ... &q&f=false
Just what the Dr ordered...


Thanks PJT
I already saw that old magazine and loved it. They have some more infos on these inserts in othe parutions. They give alot of informations on these inserts. For me these inserts would be super, well I hope, but if Will said it would be I must say :it will be.
Before deciding to adhere to the antique stove avenue, I was very uncertain of these stoves and made many conversations with William. He always tod me that about antique stoves: "you will be more than satisfied with the ant. stoves and the stove will do what you want it to do..." and the stove exactly does.
BTW, nice avatar, very refreshing on the present days :shock:
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:49 am

smithy wrote:I will say I don't have any previous experiace burning coal except in a forge however in a modern pellets stove I do.
The pellet stove heated the air as do most convection type heaters but the antique radiant heater also heats the objects in the room via infrared heating . The mica glass let's the infrared waves pass through as opposed to heating the stove body and then heating the air. I have found that when the radiant stove is all a glow this is at its most efficiency the pot is orange hot, close to 1700 degrees. The exterior walls used to be cool to touch now they are warm at 23' from the stove, like standing in the sunshine!
I don't like my stove I love my stove.


smithy,
Very nice and different comments. The walls comparison is a good demonstration and also the mica's effects.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: echos67 On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:20 am

dlj wrote:
Smokeyja wrote:Hey you base heater/burner guys- how much coal, lb wise, does your fire pots hold?
The Warm Morning I have holds 40lbs of coal and needs to be attended to no longer than every 12 hours if filled to the brim with 40lbs other wise it's bye bye fire in the morning. I'm getting tired of dumping the stove and starting over at least once a week. Just dreaming of what I can expect out of the base heater when I get one.


I didn't see anybody actually answer this question... My Glenwood #6 holds probably about 50 or 60 pounds of coal in the fire pot, maybe a bit more. I'm pretty sure I can fill it up to about 75 pounds when I want it to run longer. 12 hours is short, I'd say I can go an easy 14 hours with the stove cooking pretty hot and more like 16 hours. Now I'm talking no problems to just throw more coal in and keep on heating. At about 18 hours if I'm running hot, now then I'd have to nurse the fire back up to full running temperature. At 12 hours I'm still running with a lot of fire in the stove no matter how hot I'm running.... Well, unless I did something stupid like leave the bottom door open...

dj


DJ, I was reading an older thread awhile back and came across a story of how you aquired your stove, great story!
Something very similar happened to my with my very first 20ga single shot my parents bought me way back when.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

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Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: echos67 On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:23 am

nortcan wrote:echos, do you mean you will tear all the stove apart and seal it with rope gaskets?


Yes Sir that is the plan, the more airtight the stove the more control (I heard that before somewhere) and more efficient burns, also if I can get a better longer lasting seal that is an added bonus.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 1:11 pm

echos67 wrote:
nortcan wrote:echos, do you mean you will tear all the stove apart and seal it with rope gaskets?


Yes Sir that is the plan, the more airtight the stove the more control (I heard that before somewhere) and more efficient burns, also if I can get a better longer lasting seal that is an added bonus.


How will you do to place rope gaskets between the body parts ( I mean for the side,back long parts) and keep the gasket in place? Just curious but the idea please me very much. You may be the first one to try it on a new old stove???

Some new stoves are all gasketted seal, no cement, just gasket seals but I think they have some grooves to hold the gaskets in place, specially in the event of a blow out in the stove.
Salutations Sir
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 1:32 pm

nortcan wrote:
echos67 wrote:
nortcan wrote:echos, do you mean you will tear all the stove apart and seal it with rope gaskets?


Yes Sir that is the plan, the more airtight the stove the more control (I heard that before somewhere) and more efficient burns, also if I can get a better longer lasting seal that is an added bonus.


How will you do to place rope gaskets between the body parts ( I mean for the side,back long parts) and keep the gasket in place? Just curious but the idea please me very much. You may be the first one to try it on a new old stove???

Some new stoves are all gasketted seal, no cement, just gasket seals but I think they have some grooves to hold the gaskets in place, specially in the event of a blow out in the stove.
Salutations Sir


Pierre , the old cannon heater I have , I tore it into all it's different sections and put thin rope in the groove that they were supposed to fit together with. They fit with a tong and groove type deal but it was not meant to have rope in it. It was a tight fit but it worked. I still haven't had the chance to try it out yet.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: echos67 On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 2:04 pm

How will you do to place rope gaskets between the body parts ( I mean for the side,back long parts) and keep the gasket in place? Just curious but the idea please me very much. You may be the first one to try it on a new old stove???

Some new stoves are all gasketted seal, no cement, just gasket seals but I think they have some grooves to hold the gaskets in place, specially in the event of a blow out in the stove.
Salutations Sir[/quote]

Pierre , the old cannon heater I have , I tore it into all it's different sections and put thin rope in the groove that they were supposed to fit together with. They fit with a tong and groove type deal but it was not meant to have rope in it. It was a tight fit but it worked. I still haven't had the chance to try it out yet.[/quote]

I am thinking of some flat material used to seal glass in a door for example, it is the same material as the rope but just flat instead of round. By using flat material and taking my time and using a sealant I dont think it will slide out when puting the pieces together and compressing the gasket. I dont have access to the tools that would be required to machine a relief to hold a rope style gasket in this situation but I do agree that would be the best approach one could get.

Josh im sure your busy and all with the new addition but did you have a chance to run the stove before you resealed to be able to do a comparrison ?
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 2:26 pm

echos67 wrote:How will you do to place rope gaskets between the body parts ( I mean for the side,back long parts) and keep the gasket in place? Just curious but the idea please me very much. You may be the first one to try it on a new old stove???

Some new stoves are all gasketted seal, no cement, just gasket seals but I think they have some grooves to hold the gaskets in place, specially in the event of a blow out in the stove.
Salutations Sir


Pierre , the old cannon heater I have , I tore it into all it's different sections and put thin rope in the groove that they were supposed to fit together with. They fit with a tong and groove type deal but it was not meant to have rope in it. It was a tight fit but it worked. I still haven't had the chance to try it out yet.


I am thinking of some flat material used to seal glass in a door for example, it is the same material as the rope but just flat instead of round. By using flat material and taking my time and using a sealant I dont think it will slide out when puting the pieces together and compressing the gasket. I dont have access to the tools that would be required to machine a relief to hold a rope style gasket in this situation but I do agree that would be the best approach one could get.

Josh im sure your busy and all with the new addition but did you have a chance to run the stove before you resealed to be able to do a comparrison ?


I never did Keith . I was afraid to hook it up without extending the hearth first an I keep meaning to swap it out for a night and try but the chance of the Baby at any time kept me wanting to stick with the WM because I'm familiar with it. I did burn wood in it hot enough to cook an egg on a skillet and when it was smokey, even without a chimney , it didn't leak anywhere as far as I saw. The other down side is the grate looks like it wants to take stove size rather than nut.
Here it is cranking up the heat.
Image

If I get another stove anytime soon that needs a restore I will do the same thing and take photos this time. It's easier than it sounds Pierre. Keith has the right idea on this one. When you do this Keith, take lots of photos I always make the mistake of not documenting well enough.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: david78 On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 3:04 pm

nortcan wrote:David, your liner seems very thin 16" to 15" = about 1/2". Does it still intact from the heat? Mine is 1.25", maybe thinner would have been good?
Amazing to be able to control a so big stove that way. Very good.

I tapered the cement in at the top of the firepot so I wouldn't have a 1" lip of cement around the top. I thought it might chip off too easy. So the liner is around 1" thick everywhere except right at the top.
david78
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Fuller & Warren Splendid Oak 27
Coal Size/Type: Nut

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: dlj On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 3:12 pm

echos67 wrote:DJ, I was reading an older thread awhile back and came across a story of how you aquired your stove, great story!
Something very similar happened to my with my very first 20ga single shot my parents bought me way back when.


Like the price huh? I sure did! You'll have to post your 20ga story....

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 7:01 pm

echos67 wrote:
nortcan wrote:echos, do you mean you will tear all the stove apart and seal it with rope gaskets?


Yes Sir that is the plan, the more airtight the stove the more control (I heard that before somewhere) and more efficient burns, also if I can get a better longer lasting seal that is an added bonus.


Echos, I don't mean to pop your bubble, but; listen to me. You don't want to attempt to seal your stove with gasket material. I asked others such as Doug at Barnstable and Emery about it last year. I already knew the answer before I asked them and the answer from both was an emphactic, "NO." A high quality base heater is engineered to high tolerances. The gasket won't fit and if it does then the adjoining pieces won't fit together right. Some stoves had their big seams such as fire pot and base seams sealed with asbestos rope. Stoves that were made that way can substitute the old asbestos rope with fiberglass rope gasket. Not the Glenwood, it wasn't made that way.
You can't make the stove better than it already is with gaskets. You need a good quality cement to start with (not Rutland) along with clean, dirt and oil free seams to put together. A stove that has been properly sealed with good cement and good workmanship should last 10-15 years. That's 10 to 15 years of constant use.
Spare yourself the expense and trouble of trying to seal your Glenwood with any kind of stove gasket. Listen to your Uncle William.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: smithy On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 7:40 pm

Yep listen to Mr Will the first couple parts I put together on my radiant stove I did not use enough cement and took things apart. Practice dry fitting together first and you will get the order of operations down. I sandblasted all of my parts b4 assembly and practiced first then use lots of good cement nice and thick then tighten things up after its all fit together if the cement is oozing out you can clean up later my $2.00 worth :)
smithy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Columbia
Baseburners & Antiques: Chicago Stove Works home perfect 214
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Model: Home perfect 214

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: david78 On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 7:50 pm

Same here. When I put mine back together, everything fit tight enough that there's no way I could have gotten any gasket material in the joints.
david78
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Fuller & Warren Splendid Oak 27
Coal Size/Type: Nut

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 8:56 pm

Same with the Star Herald. A good clean joint and the best quality cement you can find. Take your time and let each piece set up a little. I like Smithy's idea of a practice run first for proper order.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: echos67 On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:34 pm

Uncle William, pointed out a couple items I did not take into account, those being dirt creating a not as clean a surface as can be when I did seal my base quickly this winter to get it into operation. Plus the fact I did use a cheaper style cement, I can handle a seal lasting as long as 10+ years. Thanks Uncle you havent steered me wrong yet!
Your nephew Keith :lol:

Nortcan, we will see what the areas to be sealed look like when the spring thaw arrives and we have warmer temps to study them.

All items will be sandblasted during the refurbish, sans the nickel parts that will get sent out for the new nickel plating.
Thanks for all the input Everyone.

Josh I will try and take alot of pictures for reference and if anyone may be interested to view them. Do you think you will get your cannon heater installed this year, Nortcan has a nice solution and a picture of what he used to decrease the size of the openings of his grates that may work so you can burn nut sized coal.

DJ I think the price you got is only second to the history you have with your stove, you should share your story again for others that may have not seen it.

Edit to include David and Steve, thanks guys.

Keith
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

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