Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:05 pm

nortcan wrote:
PJT wrote:Nortcan take a gander at this:
http://books.google.com/books?id=RDC80l ... &q&f=false
Just what the Dr ordered...


Thanks PJT
I already saw that old magazine and loved it. They have some more infos on these inserts in othe parutions. They give alot of informations on these inserts. For me these inserts would be super, well I hope, but if Will said it would be I must say :it will be.
Before deciding to adhere to the antique stove avenue, I was very uncertain of these stoves and made many conversations with William. He always tod me that about antique stoves: "you will be more than satisfied with the ant. stoves and the stove will do what you want it to do..." and the stove exactly does.
BTW, nice avatar, very refreshing on the present days :shock:


PTJ, I must apologize for my first answer. I just took time to read the acticle and realized that it was not the one I already saw from that magazine.
Thanks again
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: PJT On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:38 pm

Welcome. Amazing that a heating system like that was still being used in Brooklyn NY of all places in 1976...wonder if its still intact?
PJT
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: PJT On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:42 pm

[/quote]You need a good quality cement to start with (not Rutland) along with clean, dirt and oil free seams to put together.[/quote]

What are good cements to use?
PJT
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane

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Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: echos67 On: Wed Feb 01, 2012 6:16 pm

The last couple days have been very much out of the ordinary, yesterday was 66 and today we hit 70. Just for gp I wanted to see how the Glenwood No 6 would do since we are still getting in the 30's at night. The stove has been out of base burner mode and in direct draft mode, the mpd has been full open and just a slit in the primary air controls. Today at 70 outside the stove was 175 when I got home and running fine, the basement is warm where the stove is but the first floor is 75, not as bad as I thought it would be.

I like a lot of different stoves new and old and I am really happy with buying this antique stove this year.
I may let it go out for a few days now and burn some wood to satisfy my primitive side during the warmer weather.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: stovehospital On: Wed Feb 01, 2012 8:31 pm

Lets face the truth. Modern stoves are being reduced to appliances. In 1900 you could take one look at a stove and know who made it. They all reflected the design and culture of a company. Certain designers like Osborn of the Hub company did things that still amaze people. Today stoves all look very similar and most share parts as well. The same process is happening to cars and even cities. Everywhere you go there is the same set of burger joints, box stores etc. Homo0genization across the nation.
stovehospital
 
Stove/Furnace Make: 250 stoves in barns
Stove/Furnace Model: #6 Herald baseheater

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: LsFarm On: Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:01 pm

stovehospital wrote:Lets face the truth. Modern stoves are being reduced to appliances. In 1900 you could take one look at a stove and know who made it. They all reflected the design and culture of a company. Certain designers like Osborn of the Hub company did things that still amaze people. Today stoves all look very similar and most share parts as well. The same process is happening to cars and even cities. Everywhere you go there is the same set of burger joints, box stores etc. Homo0genization across the nation.


I have to respectfully disagree. The old cylindrical stoves, except for the fancy wood-burning parlor stoves, all look the same..
It is only through knowledge and experience that you and slowly I am able to tell a standard direct draft stove from a base burner, or one with a room heater duct on the back.

Example: 30 years ago, all 'old cars' from the teens and '20's, all looked the same to me,, then I bought a '27 car and soon, I could recognise many different makes and models from across a parking lot or show field..
I have a nephew who is very interested in a lot of modern cars, he can do the same, recognise the make and model from a hundred yards, to me, because I have zero interest, they all pretty much look the same..

I can recognise many of the box stoves because of certain design cues, and other than the stoker stoves, I don't think there are many interchangeable parts between most stoves..
Leisureline sells stoker units that Hitzer uses, and the antique Tri-burner stoker is still used by Reading.

You just have an intimate knowledge of all the stoves, stove types, and minor variations.. I'm slowly getting to recognise some differences.. but there is a lot to learn..

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:14 pm

Throughout time usually only a few have great ideas, a handful have good ideas, and the rest follow. In the 50's everyone had fins on their cars, now cars all look like rolling turds painted pretty colors, ready for their plastic shells to be metled by the sun. The guys with the great ideas died, the handful sold out, and the rest still follow... Welcome to 2012 :D Enjoy!
Last edited by Smokeyja on Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:30 pm

All the same?????????????????I was looking for infos for the Pearl to replace the Vigll, an insert like the Baltimore Heater.... and found a catalog. And curiously the stoves were made in Hamilton, Ontario.
It was from Gurney Stove 1892 and has more than 150 pages. I didn't add the number of stoves and models but I can tell you that: they were not all the same. Antique stoves made in Canada, I learned a new thing on stoves again!
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: LsFarm On: Thu Feb 02, 2012 12:39 am

:lol: :shock: :D

Yep to most of the 'general public' all those stoves are just 'old smelly, dirty, 'POTBELLY' stoves.. I'll bet if you took a photo of your beautiful 'Bride' out on the street and asked 100 people what it was, 98 would say a pretty 'potbelly stove'...

Piere, it's your knowledge that allows you to differentiate between all the details.

Once the interest and knowledge are internalized,,you will be able to recognize a Hub Heater from a Golden Bride, from A Gleenwood when driving by at 50 mph.. :shock:

Greg
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:11 am

LsFarm wrote::lol: :shock: :D

Yep to most of the 'general public' all those stoves are just 'old smelly, dirty, 'POTBELLY' stoves.. I'll bet if you took a photo of your beautiful 'Bride' out on the street and asked 100 people what it was, 98 would say a pretty 'potbelly stove'...

Piere, it's your knowledge that allows you to differentiate between all the details.

Once the interest and knowledge are internalized,,you will be able to recognize a Hub Heater from a Golden Bride, from A Gleenwood when driving by at 50 mph.. :shock:

Greg


You forgot to add through the window of a house as he passes it by at 50mph

Do you guys think the EPA regulations are what hinders the looks of stoves these days? I would be curious to see how the Base heaters/burners match the new stoves emissions ratings. I really have no idea of the restrictions or liberties that are given to the stove manufacturers. And maybe I am wrong about all of what I just said and it's all due to supply, demand, and cost of manufacturing. Sand molds aren't horribly hard to make and foundries aren't that scarce anymore that it couldn't be done again. I also wonder what happend to all of the tooling, molds, machinary that came from some of these stove manufactuerers. I know we collect stoves here but where is all of the stuff that made the stoves? The blueprints, drawings, designs. Wouldn't it be just awesome to get a hold of the details to make a stove like the glenwood #6 or even Pierre's Bride. I am sure there are some details on the US Patten offices website but that only goes so far. I think that if a company could gather this information and the legal rights to produce some of the Big HItter stoves that they would make one hell of a name for themselves.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: LsFarm On: Thu Feb 02, 2012 9:48 am

To take the 'all look the same' comment one step further:

I collect examples of one of the finest automobiles ever made: the Pierce Arrow. I often will fire one up and use it to run a simple errand into town..
And since they are an attractive automobile, they often get 'sight seeers' and gawkers.. and often many questions..

The MOST ANNOYING question or comment is: It's a Ford model T isn't it?? I want to PUKE.. :shock: :mad:
My '25 Pierce Arrow as equiped cost around $3000,00 when it was sold... In 1925, you could but a Ford model T for under $300.oo..

So my response is the tidbit of education I just wrote, followed by : It's TEN model T's !! :P :D

So it's through our education, experience and appreciation for the engineering and quality of the fine old stoves that we can appreciate them and recognise them..

What do you think of the Harbor Freight $199.oo potbelly stoves?? make me want to PUKE yet again..

Greg L
Attachments
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1925 Pierce Arrow 7 passenger Touring, list price in '25 was $2975, plus a few options mine cost around $3150.
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LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Thu Feb 02, 2012 10:12 am

I just hope not to have to ask 100 peoples on the street if they reconize my ""Bride""", from a window and plus while driving :lol:
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: wsherrick On: Thu Feb 02, 2012 10:18 am

LsFarm wrote:To take the 'all look the same' comment one step further:

I collect examples of one of the finest automobiles ever made: the Pierce Arrow. I often will fire on up and use it to run a simple errand into town..
And since they are an attractive automobile, they often get 'sight seeers' and gawkers.. and often many questions..

The MOST ANNOYING question or comment is: It's a Ford model T isn't it?? I want to PUKE.. :shock: :mad:
My '25 Pierce Arrow as equiped cost around $3000,00 when it was sold... In 1925, you could but a Ford model T for under $300.oo..

So my response is the tidbit of education I just wrote, followed by : It's TEN model T's !! :P :D

So it's through our education, experience and appreciation for the engineering and quality of the fine old stoves that we can appreciate them and recognise them..

What do you think of the Harbor Freight $199.oo potbelly stoves?? make me want to PUKE yet again..

Greg L


You beat me to the punch with your analogy. I was going to say a Packard though is a model T. I like Pierce Arrows as well. If I was going to buy one of those, "Model T's," it would be a Packard, "Model T."
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: franco b On: Thu Feb 02, 2012 11:07 am

To disparage the model T is a big mistake. It is the car that put America on wheels. It was ten years ahead of its time when introduced. Very few things in history can equal the T for cleverness of engineering and production. To make something both cheap and good is far harder to do than expensive. The T has landmark status that no other car can even come close to.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Thu Feb 02, 2012 12:05 pm

Not an expert in the antique cars market, I was thinking that the model T was from Ford only, someone can help me on that question.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

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