Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 9:37 am

Smoke,

I'd say that 12 hours is a fairly common tending time (for any stove) when burning hard through the winter. There are people who are going to say they can go 24+ hours and that's true but that's when the stove is idling or burning low. That's why I feel like a little bigger (than you need) is a bit better than a little undersized and having to run flat out all the time. A larger stove with 60-80+ pounds of coal in it, that's just cruising at 350-400, is going to tend out allot longer than a smaller unit firing at 500+ all the time. As I see it, it's really about what can I run my stove at to get the desired effect for my given space. Other than that, there is no real magic bullet. Certainly some stoves are more efficient that others, but that usually is in how well that unit transfers its heat into the space before exhausting to the chimney, and how well it actually extracts from the coal, meaning how well it burns it to ash.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 10:55 am

SteveZee wrote:Smoke,

I'd say that 12 hours is a fairly common tending time (for any stove) when burning hard through the winter. There are people who are going to say they can go 24+ hours and that's true but that's when the stove is idling or burning low. That's why I feel like a little bigger (than you need) is a bit better than a little undersized and having to run flat out all the time. A larger stove with 60-80+ pounds of coal in it, that's just cruising at 350-400, is going to tend out allot longer than a smaller unit firing at 500+ all the time. As I see it, it's really about what can I run my stove at to get the desired effect for my given space. Other than that, there is no real magic bullet. Certainly some stoves are more efficient that others, but that usually is in how well that unit transfers its heat into the space before exhausting to the chimney, and how well it actually extracts from the coal, meaning how well it burns it to ash.



You're right I will be going with a larger stove (base heater) I never had asked what sizes of coal most held. I can't wait to get a "new" old stove from Emery at the stove hospital. I am on the list but haven't heard back from him yet. I talked the wife into going to the salvage yard with me today, so maybe I'll find something cool there.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 11:57 am

Josh,
Good idea to scavange around. You never know what you can dig up. Up here in New England, they are in a barn or down in the basement of older homes.
That's my plan too, to go with a larger stove that is very adjustable so I can dial it back when needed but it still has all the nads I need for whatever gets thrown my way. ;)
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

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Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 1:21 pm

Well I didn't find anything amazing today, just a few little coal stove and a coal/wood cook stove that I might buy sometime. I went their to find a stove and bought an old military style gas can that still had a perfect inside to it, no rust! It's for the old Farmall tractors. I have a few photos of the stoves I did see there though including an old little "Hot Blast" It was so little though. In fact I couldn't see having a stove any smaller than my WM. But something wonderful was happening when I came home. The WMs flue pipe is @ 150F but the stove is cruising away at 650F ! Finally it's working how I want it too. Maybe it senses it's near replacement :P It's been a love hate relationship with the WM but mostly love.

I couldn't talk the Mrs. into another salvage yard today but until next time! There is plenty antique stove hunting left to do in my lifetime.

*pics

I don't know what type of fuel this burned but it looked cool.
Image

a little "SUN" cannon heater
Image

a "Victor Junior" cook stove. I might actually buy this stove to restore and sell if I can keep the price low
Image

a little "Hot Blast" stove
Image


He had a few others like a WM 414A just like the one I have and another I couldn't find the name on but none were in that great of shape and most were missing parts. He does however have some mismatch parts here in there for sale if anyone needs something. I am going to buy some of the cast iron cook plates from him.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 7:22 pm

You'r lucky to have places to look for stoves and all about stoves. Here in Qc, not many place like that except a few ones for cooking ranges.

BTW, in my dreams I think to an insert for a replacement of the V2. The Windsor or Baltimore and Sexton heater models are the thing that could fit in my faux-foyer( but needing some works on it) with some remoldings. Around 1905, and they look like a base burner having the top cut off and having no base. They usually have a surronding and work like a base burner. 16" fire pot would be the best to receive a liner.
If you or someone else see some , just let me know. Slowly, I prepare my wife for the next antique... :secret: Should be easy cause the next one is not an other Bride in the home!
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nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 7:39 pm

Beautiful Pierre! Looks like a large version of William's Argand. I think Emery just did one over a little while back too for his home.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 7:59 pm

Smokeyja wrote:
SteveZee wrote:Smoke,

I'd say that 12 hours is a fairly common tending time (for any stove) when burning hard through the winter. There are people who are going to say they can go 24+ hours and that's true but that's when the stove is idling or burning low. That's why I feel like a little bigger (than you need) is a bit better than a little undersized and having to run flat out all the time. A larger stove with 60-80+ pounds of coal in it, that's just cruising at 350-400, is going to tend out allot longer than a smaller unit firing at 500+ all the time. As I see it, it's really about what can I run my stove at to get the desired effect for my given space. Other than that, there is no real magic bullet. Certainly some stoves are more efficient that others, but that usually is in how well that unit transfers its heat into the space before exhausting to the chimney, and how well it actually extracts from the coal, meaning how well it burns it to ash.



You're right I will be going with a larger stove (base heater) I never had asked what sizes of coal most held. I can't wait to get a "new" old stove from Emery at the stove hospital. I am on the list but haven't heard back from him yet. I talked the wife into going to the salvage yard with me today, so maybe I'll find something cool there.


They made base heaters with fire pots up to 26" inches. A stove like that would hold at least 200 pounds of coal at a time. If it had its magazine, even more than that. Big stoves like that were made for stores, school houses and other large open spaces like those. A Glenwood No 6 with a 16 inch fire pot or another brand with the same size will be MORE than enough stove to heat your house. A Glenwood No 8 has an 18" fire pot for comparison. The more coal you have burning at a time will emit more BTU's per hour than a smaller stove running at the same temperature, therefore; a larger stove can operate at a lower temperature and still radiate more heat than a smaller stove at a higher rate. This is simply because there is more coal burning at the same time in the larger stove.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 8:04 pm

SteveZee wrote:Beautiful Pierre! Looks like a large version of William's Argand. I think Emery just did one over a little while back too for his home.


Thanks Steve, I'm in contact with Emery and still wait for some answers. They seem to be very busy with the business plus some additions to the work shop.
The Stanley or the Household Peach are more like Parlor stoves and the ones on the photos are real inserts with a complex long gasses path at the back. The good things for me with the inserts is that the flue exit is vertical and they are compact at the back. All that help cause I don't have much place at the back.
Not in a hurry and I study all options possible.
Thanks
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 8:07 pm

nortcan wrote:
SteveZee wrote:Beautiful Pierre! Looks like a large version of William's Argand. I think Emery just did one over a little while back too for his home.


Thanks Steve, I'm in contact with Emery and still wait for some answers. They seem to be very busy with the business plus some additions to the work shop.
The Stanley or the Household Peach are more like Parlor stoves and the ones on the photos are real inserts with a complex long gasses path at the back. The good things for me with the inserts is that the flue exit is vertical and they are compact at the back. All that help cause I don't have much place at the back.
Not in a hurry and I study all options possible.
Thanks


A Baltimore Heater would be fine for you. They like all other types of stoves came in all sizes. They are out there. I will start looking for you.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: PJT On: Sat Jan 14, 2012 8:20 pm

Nortcan take a gander at this:
http://books.google.com/books?id=RDC80l ... &q&f=false
Just what the Dr ordered...
PJT
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: dlj On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 12:37 am

Smokeyja wrote:Hey you base heater/burner guys- how much coal, lb wise, does your fire pots hold?
The Warm Morning I have holds 40lbs of coal and needs to be attended to no longer than every 12 hours if filled to the brim with 40lbs other wise it's bye bye fire in the morning. I'm getting tired of dumping the stove and starting over at least once a week. Just dreaming of what I can expect out of the base heater when I get one.


I didn't see anybody actually answer this question... My Glenwood #6 holds probably about 50 or 60 pounds of coal in the fire pot, maybe a bit more. I'm pretty sure I can fill it up to about 75 pounds when I want it to run longer. 12 hours is short, I'd say I can go an easy 14 hours with the stove cooking pretty hot and more like 16 hours. Now I'm talking no problems to just throw more coal in and keep on heating. At about 18 hours if I'm running hot, now then I'd have to nurse the fire back up to full running temperature. At 12 hours I'm still running with a lot of fire in the stove no matter how hot I'm running.... Well, unless I did something stupid like leave the bottom door open...

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 5:48 am

dlj wrote:
Smokeyja wrote:Hey you base heater/burner guys- how much coal, lb wise, does your fire pots hold?
The Warm Morning I have holds 40lbs of coal and needs to be attended to no longer than every 12 hours if filled to the brim with 40lbs other wise it's bye bye fire in the morning. I'm getting tired of dumping the stove and starting over at least once a week. Just dreaming of what I can expect out of the base heater when I get one.


I didn't see anybody actually answer this question... My Glenwood #6 holds probably about 50 or 60 pounds of coal in the fire pot, maybe a bit more. I'm pretty sure I can fill it up to about 75 pounds when I want it to run longer. 12 hours is short, I'd say I can go an easy 14 hours with the stove cooking pretty hot and more like 16 hours. Now I'm talking no problems to just throw more coal in and keep on heating. At about 18 hours if I'm running hot, now then I'd have to nurse the fire back up to full running temperature. At 12 hours I'm still running with a lot of fire in the stove no matter how hot I'm running.... Well, unless I did something stupid like leave the bottom door open...

dj


These times are very reassuring to me in spending the money for this future base heater. Sometimes I can't quite make it at 12 hours and I'll usually lose the fire. If I'm burning hotter it's more like 8-10 hours. After a week the stove needs to be cleaned then re-lit to hold any practical times. And 40lbs of coal gone in 8 hours isn't so cool to me. I have already been convinced of the greatness of these base heaters/burners I just like to talk about them in the in between time. Plus I know you guys like talking about them and our proud of these works of art.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:05 am

wsherrick wrote:
Smokeyja wrote:
SteveZee wrote:Smoke,

I'd say that 12 hours is a fairly common tending time (for any stove) when burning hard through the winter. There are people who are going to say they can go 24+ hours and that's true but that's when the stove is idling or burning low. That's why I feel like a little bigger (than you need) is a bit better than a little undersized and having to run flat out all the time. A larger stove with 60-80+ pounds of coal in it, that's just cruising at 350-400, is going to tend out allot longer than a smaller unit firing at 500+ all the time. As I see it, it's really about what can I run my stove at to get the desired effect for my given space. Other than that, there is no real magic bullet. Certainly some stoves are more efficient that others, but that usually is in how well that unit transfers its heat into the space before exhausting to the chimney, and how well it actually extracts from the coal, meaning how well it burns it to ash.



You're right I will be going with a larger stove (base heater) I never had asked what sizes of coal most held. I can't wait to get a "new" old stove from Emery at the stove hospital. I am on the list but haven't heard back from him yet. I talked the wife into going to the salvage yard with me today, so maybe I'll find something cool there.


They made base heaters with fire pots up to 26" inches. A stove like that would hold at least 200 pounds of coal at a time. If it had its magazine, even more than that. Big stoves like that were made for stores, school houses and other large open spaces like those. A Glenwood No 6 with a 16 inch fire pot or another brand with the same size will be MORE than enough stove to heat your house. A Glenwood No 8 has an 18" fire pot for comparison. The more coal you have burning at a time will emit more BTU's per hour than a smaller stove running at the same temperature, therefore; a larger stove can operate at a lower temperature and still radiate more heat than a smaller stove at a higher rate. This is simply because there is more coal burning at the same time in the larger stove.


Yep William, You've confirmed just what I have been thinking about the bigger (with control) is better theory. It just makes sense that all that mass will radiate more heat plus your able to run at lower stove temps and get longer tending times.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: smithy On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:23 am

I will say I don't have any previous experiace burning coal except in a forge however in a modern pellets stove I do.
The pellet stove heated the air as do most convection type heaters but the antique radiant heater also heats the objects in the room via infrared heating . The mica glass let's the infrared waves pass through as opposed to heating the stove body and then heating the air. I have found that when the radiant stove is all a glow this is at its most efficiency the pot is orange hot, close to 1700 degrees. The exterior walls used to be cool to touch now they are warm at 23' from the stove, like standing in the sunshine!
I don't like my stove I love my stove.
smithy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Columbia
Baseburners & Antiques: Chicago Stove Works home perfect 214
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Model: Home perfect 214

Re: Do you like your ANTIQUE stove?

PostBy: nortcan On: Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:26 am

wsherrick wrote:
nortcan wrote:
SteveZee wrote:Beautiful Pierre! Looks like a large version of William's Argand. I think Emery just did one over a little while back too for his home.


Thanks Steve, I'm in contact with Emery and still wait for some answers. They seem to be very busy with the business plus some additions to the work shop.
The Stanley or the Household Peach are more like Parlor stoves and the ones on the photos are real inserts with a complex long gasses path at the back. The good things for me with the inserts is that the flue exit is vertical and they are compact at the back. All that help cause I don't have much place at the back.
Not in a hurry and I study all options possible.
Thanks


A Baltimore Heater would be fine for you. They like all other types of stoves came in all sizes. They are out there. I will start looking for you.


Thanks Will. I saw one from C. Weiss , a very nice but the price was too high considering all the cost I must invest on the faux-foyer remoldings.
I still wait some more infos from Emery, he told me he had 2 Household Peach and will come back to me with infos on it.
Last edited by nortcan on Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Visit Hitzer Stoves