Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: PC 12-47E On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 9:47 am

SteveZee wrote:Eddie,

Yep I sure would too (keep running). They came both ways, as a direct draft and indirect so no worries. I'd keep a look out for the baffle or at least one to copy from. I would have thought the 114 would have worked? Emery knows a heck of a lot more than me though! Hopefully he can cast you one. I think the differance (as far as I can tell with my Herald) is the stove runs hotter direct, with a bit higher stack temp. When I close that damper, it settles back about 50 degrees and will burn a good bit longer with lower stack temp.

wsherrick wrote:


Seeing is believing. I could have told you that the Glenwood would easily outdo the Gibralter. If the Glenwood's seams and doors are as they should be, the Glenwood can produce much more heat for less coal. Even as a direct draft stove they are better. The upright design is simply more efficient for burning coal than other types. Most people think the pretty skirt is a needless piece of decoration. You can truly feel a noticable improvement in the stove's ability to warm the air around it because of the skirt.


The Glenwood does a better job heating and is using less coal than the Gibraltar. :D
Ashburnham55 sent all the indirect back pipe parts to his Glenwood #114 for me to make castings from.
Thank you Ashburnham !!!!
After removing the back pipe from the #116, the baffle plate is about 1 1/2" too short and the width is too narrow by about 3/4". I did make a pattern of #114 parts and a pattern that would work for the #116.
Yesterday I made the trip to the Auburn Stove Foundry to see if a baffle & damper could be cast...But the Foundry was closed.......Next Friday I will try again.

Eddie
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Indirect back pipe baffle and damper for a Glenwood #114 Modern Oak
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Indirect backpipe base of my Glenwood #116 Modern Oak
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PC 12-47E
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Estate Heatrola, Jotul 507

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: LsFarm On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:47 am

From the looks of the divider plate you could easily fabricate this out of steel, since it isn't exposed to the direct fire in the firepot.

Just some 1/8" hot rolled flat stock, cut to the width of the oval. Cut an inverted 'U' in the bottom to create the passageway for the exhaust
to make it's 180* turn.

At the top, you could make a similar rectangular damper/door/flapper, just flame cut out the piece, add a 1/4" piece of steel rod to the door,
braze or weld a 3/8" nut to the diverter to make pivot bearings.. run the rod up through the top cap, and just put a handle on it to control the
door.

I could make it up in a few hours, with a coffee break or two !1

I am currious, anybody know why the divider has that hole halfway down? that would seem to spoil the divider's ability to direct the exhaust to the bottom
of the indirect pipe ??

Greg L.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: PC 12-47E On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:01 am

LsFarm wrote:From the looks of the divider plate you could easily fabricate this out of steel, since it isn't exposed to the direct fire in the firepot.
Just some 1/8" hot rolled flat stock, cut to the width of the oval. Cut an inverted 'U' in the bottom to create the passageway for the exhaust
to make it's 180* turn.
At the top, you could make a similar rectangular damper/door/flapper, just flame cut out the piece, add a 1/4" piece of steel rod to the door,
I am currious, anybody know why the divider has that hole halfway down? that would seem to spoil the divider's ability to direct the exhaust to the bottom
of the indirect pipe ??

Greg L.


Good point Greg.
How do you think the steel plate would hold up to the high temp exhaust gas. I do not have a pyrometer to measure the inside exhaust temp. What I am thinking is that most steel used in coal stoves has one side hot and the other exposed to room temp.

Eddie
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PC 12-47E
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Estate Heatrola, Jotul 507

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Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: whistlenut On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:35 am

Eddie, get away from that computer, let's all go outside...42 here.....feels like Miami to us salty ole dawgs....
whistlenut
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA130's,260's, AHS130&260's,EFM900,GJ&VanWert
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Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: LsFarm On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 12:28 pm

Eddie, the inside of the average steel stove is going to be hotter than that piece of steel in the diverter pipe.. measure the outside of your box stove, it was >500*, and now measure the outside of your diverter pipe on the back of the Glenwood Oak, I'm thinking it is simlar or maybe 100* cooler..

The cost of making the steel plate is minimal, I could go buy the steel retail and charge $50/hour and you'd still only have $150 in the piece.. I don't think you can get the three pieces cast for that.

How wide does the plate need to be?? or asked another way, how wide is the oval diverter pipe?? 6" ?? I think 1/8" hot rolled steel can be bought in 6" widths, I have 40' of 4' wide plate.

You could even make a simpler setup,, make the plate without the inverted U on the bottom, and cut the plate short, so that when it is in the pipe, the exhaust can just go over the top of the plate, directly to the flue..

Then, weld a rod to the plate, tall enough to stick above the pipe top cover.. and have say a 4" ,90* L or handle bent on the end..

With the plate resting on the bottom of the pipe's base, the exhaust would go right out the flue, like it's doing now.

Then, lift on the handle, bring the divider plate up till it's near the top of the cap, and either make a 'crutch' to hold the handle at this height, or make some kind of clip/pin ?? to hold the rod and handle at this positon.. the exhaust will be blocked from the direct path and will have to travel to the bottom of the pipe, and back up.. it will have a wider gap at the bottom, but with that hole in the original divider, a wider gap at the bottom is not a problem..

This one I could make up in less than an hour. It's just a rectangular piece of steel with a rod welded on it, the rod poked up through the top cap, and a 90* handle bent on the rod..

Real simple, real quick..

I'm not doing anything, send me the dimensions and I'll make it up for you,,, but the shipping will be a lot !! :mad:

Greg L.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: PJT On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 1:10 pm

Eddie Id be interested in how much they will charge to recast this for you....I am in need of one for a 114 as well as for a 116.....although I do own a couple welders.....but I sold my Bridgeport Mill so cutting the steel would be tough for me :?
PJT
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: PC 12-47E On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 1:20 pm

W.N., 52*F at the moment...Working on the Barn deal etc... ;)

Greg, The baffle would have to be 27" long by 8" wide.... I know that we will have the steel sitting in the scrap bin at the Yacht Building Yard. 8-) The back pipe is 8" by 4 1/2" oval ...But just heavy gauge stove pipe. I am sure that I will be able to build one this week.

Thanks for the great idea...

Eddie
PC 12-47E
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Estate Heatrola, Jotul 507

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: PC 12-47E On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 1:25 pm

PJT wrote:Eddie Id be interested in how much they will charge to recast this for you....I am in need of one for a 114 as well as for a 116.....although I do own a couple welders.....but I sold my Bridgeport Mill so cutting the steel would be tough for me :?


I think that with a steel bandsaw, die grinder & a hole saw this prodject would take no time at all. 8-)

Eddie
PC 12-47E
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Estate Heatrola, Jotul 507

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: PJT On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 3:02 pm

Will the steel expand more or less than the cast iron when it heats up and do you need to account for that in the dimensions of the steel baffle?
PJT
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: PJT On: Sun Feb 19, 2012 3:46 pm

Eddie it would be interesting to see how the Glenwood Oak compares with your baseburner in terms of economy of coal usage once you have the backpipe assembly installed.....please keep us updated :!:
PJT
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Mon Feb 20, 2012 10:31 am

Eddie,

Greg had some good ideas about fabbing it up from steel.
You DO need to keep that horseshoe on the bottom though as that is the farthest length for the exhaust to travel and that's what you want, to bleed heat off. I think steel would work and not be a problem temp wise (if anything, you might get a little warpage over time?) Cast iron is best but certainly the steel is way more economical. If you do make it with steel, I would definately simplify the design from the 114 setup, to a simple Manual Pipe damper type set up that most of these indirect stoves use anyway.
That's how my Herald is set up. I couldn't find the original damper but was able to use a cast iron MPD and tacked a small (balance) weight on the other end coming through the pipe to compensate for the lack of the spring tension they usually use (on a MPD). It works just fine and is much simpler. The balance weight is just a small bolt welded on to the end of the pivot shaft so that when it's closed, the weight is on the "downside" (holding it closed a bit) and when open, the weight is just over the Top dead center on the "backside" to hold it open. Hope that makes sense? This would be a really easy way to make your divider from steel. Just get that top piece right so that it seals well against the pipe and exhaust can't get by it, and the hole sized for the MPD you use and you're good to go.

If you do have "originals" cast, you will have to make mock-ups from something like plywood, in the correct size, for them to cast from. If you go this way, make the mock-ups a hair to the large size as there is a little shrinkage. Oh I see you did make the mock ups copys to fit your 116.

PS: One other thing is you need to look at is a picture of another 116 and see where the second exhaust collar is located. Looking at your stove, it's looks high like it was put there to be direct vented out. Mine (and most others I've seen) have the second indirect pipe exhaust port down around the middle of that back pipe (not up top where yours is). It probably coincides with that round hole in the baffle plate for the direct vent setting.
Last edited by SteveZee on Mon Feb 20, 2012 8:12 pm, edited 3 times in total.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: nortcan On: Mon Feb 20, 2012 12:23 pm

To my personnal opinion, the ony one problem with fabricating the parts instead of having them re-casted with cast iron is on the antique side. If someone wants to keep the stove as when original, better to go with the "as when new". But if that point is not important for the stove's owner, then making the back parts with steel plates is the best way to go.
Before I decided to look for an isert, I decided I could get a direct draft parlor stove and make a long gasses path at the back with steel plates. It would have been a sort of box at the back of the stove, so in indirect mode the gasses would split in 2 parts at the top, one part to the right and the other to the left, then both going down to the base of the box. There the 2 flues would make a U turn to go in a central channel and rise to the exit. That box would be about 4"D X ???20"W X ??24"H. The measures would be according to the stove size. To have more heat transfer and a stronger unit, I would weld 3 or 4, 3/4" X 1/4" flat steel bars at the back of the box, but not welded flat on the box, welded on the side of the bar to the box.
The flues would be calibrated according to the stove.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
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Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Feb 21, 2012 5:57 pm

If I went to the trouble of making a pattern to cast these parts, I would contact every stove restoration place I knew. Since many of these stoves are missing the original parts, it might be a blessing to all if new ones could be made available. It might also mean a little extra pocket change for you as well.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
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Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: dlj On: Tue Feb 21, 2012 7:13 pm

PJT wrote:Will the steel expand more or less than the cast iron when it heats up and do you need to account for that in the dimensions of the steel baffle?


Not an issue for the tolerances you need for these parts.

dj
dlj
 
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Re: Glenwood Modern Oak # 116

PostBy: LsFarm On: Tue Feb 21, 2012 9:49 pm

Agreed, the back tube is steel, not cast, so if you make a steel divider, the expansion will be the same or similar. These pieces are not in anyway a close fit, they don't need to seal or be anything but a close fit..

I agree that it would be nice to have re-cast original-style pieces, but untill you can find ones to reproduce, the simple steel divider plate will make the back tube funcitonal as additional radiant heat surface..

I can't remember, I don't think the top cap for the back tube is original anyway?? or is it??

Easy enough to get it heating properly, with a steel divider.. and wait for the correct parts to reproduce.

Greg L
LsFarm
 
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