Stove technology,efficiency new materials for a stove!


Re: Stove technology,efficiency new materials for a stove!

PostBy: gowriel On: Sat Jan 26, 2013 11:24 am

Hello everybody!
It's been a while since I posted here but here I am! :D
I managed to solve the heating "problem" by building a masonry stove with chamotte bricks(about 320 pieces and a total weight of 1500 kilograms) after an old russian stove model!
PTOU-2500
It can "handle" all sorts of fuels, like wood,anthracite/coals,petroleum coke and almost anything solid that will burn!
Here is a link for the russian guy/site after wich I copied the plans and build the stove!
http://bousya.narod.ru/stove/stove.htm
And some pictures and two videos of the stove I and a friend build:
http://i45.tinypic.com/yoxvd.jpg
http://i50.tinypic.com/k059x2.jpg
http://i47.tinypic.com/2ymxdzo.jpg
http://i46.tinypic.com/10s88m1.jpg
http://i47.tinypic.com/9td7ic.jpg
http://i49.tinypic.com/f0bvqg.jpg
http://i46.tinypic.com/34pjqio.jpg
http://i46.tinypic.com/b5668n.jpg
http://i48.tinypic.com/aaxdnn.jpg
http://i48.tinypic.com/2a6pkkn.jpg
http://i50.tinypic.com/2pzcgn4.jpg
http://i45.tinypic.com/ojjqqq.jpg
http://i46.tinypic.com/8vw5t4.jpg
http://i45.tinypic.com/ay6e61.jpg
http://i50.tinypic.com/32zm6mp.jpg
http://i45.tinypic.com/2rfwm7n.jpg
http://i50.tinypic.com/2dw4t4z.jpg
http://i45.tinypic.com/15ppx07.jpg
The videos were filmed with what I had "around" and in a rush so please take it as is or don't watch it...
I'll do better videos when I'll have better camera!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeLmiyZnrx0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMoIST73GRo
Cheers from ROMANIA!
:D
gowriel
 
Stove/Furnace Make: custom
Stove/Furnace Model: custom

Re: Stove technology,efficiency new materials for a stove!

PostBy: franco b On: Sat Jan 26, 2013 12:43 pm

Good for you. Well Done. That type of stove goes back a long way. By providing a huge amount of heat absorbing surface a wood fire can be burned hot with plenty of air to keep clean without losing too much heat up the chimney.

My only concern is that there be clean out ports to keep all those passages clean. I don't think it will burn coal very well though.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Visit Lehigh Anthracite

Re: Stove technology,efficiency new materials for a stove!

PostBy: gowriel On: Sat Jan 26, 2013 3:18 pm

Thanks!
The stove has two "ports"/little doors in its construction design , wich I gave up on and just added 2 chamotte bricks wich have a "ditch"/channel on 3 sides for a stainless steel wire bend to the shape of the brick wich can be removed for this purpose: to clean those places were ash/creosete might stick around!
I haven't tried yet to burn coal because coal its a high power fuel but I can get anthracite for about 30 cents us dollar 2 pounds(or 1 kg).
I have talked with one user here and it seems that this coal comes FROM YOUR COUNTRY...
But never mind that...
It should burn coal well because the air comes through a cast iron grate from UNDER the fire!
Even with wood briquettes or very dried wood it burns with a blueish flame when it's almost finished but this happens ONLY if the wood is over the grate through wich air comes in!
I was thinking about adding secondary air for better combustion but since this is my first masonry stove ,I chose to leave it as is!
This stove could be improved and turned into a central heating unit by adding a heat exchanger in the secondary "chamber" before the fumes go out the chimney!
As a note: the temperature on the stack doesn't goes over 90 degrees celcius no matter what I burn or how open the primary air is!
Maybe it's because the stove has lots of water in it wich "steals the heat" away...
But I'm working on that , by giving it a good fire every morning wich lasts/keeps the stove hot/warm for about 9 hours!
I hope it stays warm for a longer time but that remains to be seen when no water will be present anywhere in it!
I'm glad you liked the stove!
Cheers 8-)
gowriel
 
Stove/Furnace Make: custom
Stove/Furnace Model: custom

Re: Stove technology,efficiency new materials for a stove!

PostBy: franco b On: Sat Jan 26, 2013 4:02 pm

Don't go crazy trying to lower the stack temperature too much. You need it to create draft and to prevent condensation of the flue gas.

Your blue flame indicates that the air handling is working very well. Blue flame happens when air is mixed with the fuel before burning and then lit. Yellow flame is little bits of carbon that have been released and only then get enough air and heat to burn.

A lot of work but now you have something to be proud of.

You might Google Rocket stove to see another interesting design.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Stove technology,efficiency new materials for a stove!

PostBy: rockwood On: Sat Jan 26, 2013 4:47 pm

Masonry heaters can work very well and have been used for a long, long time in certain areas around the globe. If I ever build a new home, it will have a masonry heater.

I do have one question, what kind of floor is the heater built on? That's a lot of weight so be sure the floor is strong enough to handle this weight long term.
rockwood
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Stokermatic coal furnace
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Rockwood Stoveworks Circulator
Baseburners & Antiques: Malleable/Monarch Range
Coal Size/Type: Soft coal: Lump and stoker (slack coal)

Re: Stove technology,efficiency new materials for a stove!

PostBy: gowriel On: Sat Jan 26, 2013 6:10 pm

franco b wrote:Don't go crazy trying to lower the stack temperature too much. You need it to create draft and to prevent condensation of the flue gas.

Your blue flame indicates that the air handling is working very well. Blue flame happens when air is mixed with the fuel before burning and then lit. Yellow flame is little bits of carbon that have been released and only then get enough air and heat to burn.

A lot of work but now you have something to be proud of.

You might Google Rocket stove to see another interesting design.

There's lots of draft;yesterday I tried hard to light the fire;I managed only by shuting down any door,window,air intake and by almost covering the main door from the stove with my body :lol:
I'm satisfied before beeing proud!
As for the work, you're sooo right!
I've spent 2 days from morning to late evening with a friend of mine to build this stove!
He was in a hurry I wanted it build as soon as it could be possible,but the biggest "thank you" should go to the Bosch company for building such good angle grinders because that's what we used for cutting those chamotte bricks...
And there were a lot of cuts as you can see in the link I gave you in the previous post!
I'll post more when I get to burn anthracite in it , but I don't whant to rush things yet!
After a complete drying I'll throw some coal in there just out of curiosity!
gowriel
 
Stove/Furnace Make: custom
Stove/Furnace Model: custom

Re: Stove technology,efficiency new materials for a stove!

PostBy: gowriel On: Sat Jan 26, 2013 6:18 pm

rockwood wrote:Masonry heaters can work very well and have been used for a long, long time in certain areas around the globe. If I ever build a new home, it will have a masonry heater.

I do have one question, what kind of floor is the heater built on? That's a lot of weight so be sure the floor is strong enough to handle this weight long term.

You're so right!
In a very cold area as Siberia the only way to heat your home is with very good insulation and a big mass storage masonry stove!
There are better/more efficient designs build by Kuznetsov but I gave up on them after numerous emails,questions and attempts to convince them that I just want a design for a wood stove to heat a small space/room!
They just wouldn't give complete plans for free...
As for the floor on wich the stove was built , this house was in construction for almost 5 years before I bought it ,and the area on wich the stove was built had a thick 20 cm very hard concrete slab, wich I attempted to break but gave up on it...
On top of that I had to pour another 5-7cm thick concrete to give the room some sort of "level"/straight floor before mounting that laminate flooring wich I cut out anyway for the area specially dedicated to the base of the stove!
I too hope it will hold well on the long term, but only time will tell!
If it cracks ,I'll just build it again but pouring a really thick steel reinforced foundation for it and MAYBE add that secondary air supply for much better/complete combustion!
But I hope it doesn't gets to that!
:D
P.S. : here's a link to his site:
http://www.stovemaster.com/html_en/desi ... story.html
gowriel
 
Stove/Furnace Make: custom
Stove/Furnace Model: custom

Visit Lehigh Anthracite