Storing Hard Coal

Storing Hard Coal

PostBy: Mark II On: Wed Mar 09, 2005 11:55 am

I just started burning hard coal this year. I am considering buying 20 tons and storing it in a covered shelter. This will be about 5 or 6 years supply. Do you see any problem with doing this ?
Mark II
 

PostBy: Richard S. On: Thu Mar 10, 2005 5:49 am

Anthracite is a very stable product, there's no signifigant degradation in the product over time especially over just 4 to 5 years. They are still removing old RR beds around here that are well over 50 years old. They consist entirely of the smalller sizes such as rice and barley which was unable at that time.

If your going to that I would suggest getting it in the summer time. You'll gwt the best price and depending on the source most likely the cleanest product you can get.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Prices of nut coal

PostBy: Mark II On: Thu Mar 10, 2005 9:41 pm

I live in Western Pa, Indiana County. I have purchased coal twice so far both 1/2 ton batches. I wasn't happy with the first batch, the coal didn't burn very good, made a LOT of ash, and wouldn't stay through the night. The last batch, from a different yard, is doing MUCH better. I think that I have found a good source from the second coal yard. The first coal yard charged me $142 a ton, the second yard charged $150 a ton. [The second yard just raised his price from $135 to $150 a ton]. Do you think that this price will be stable or come down any in the summer months? Or worse yet, will I see another price increase ??
Mark II
 


PostBy: Richard S. On: Thu Mar 10, 2005 11:31 pm

Historically coal prices have always been fairly stable, there has been fluctutations but you don't see the huge fluctuations like you see in other energy markets such as Gas and Oil.

Having said that what the future holds is anyones guess. My guess is that it will be around the current price or slightly lower for the summer months providing there isn't a huge spike in fuel costs. Even with a large fuel spike cost the price should not go up that much, that's just my opinion based on past performances.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Prices & quality of nut coal

PostBy: Guest On: Sun Oct 23, 2005 11:58 pm

Mark I'm in the same town as you and use hard coal. If you revisit this forum give me a call at 724-465-4232. I'd like to speak with you about your experience with the different suppliers.

As I understand two families own all the mines out East. My thought is that the quality is dependent upon which company mines it. Alternatively, it would seem possible that quality could vary by company. Maybe the admin could offer his expert opinion hear. As I understand you can't see the quality if its unburt. Maybe you see it if the ashes are powder (I've had a company say that some coal they bought turned to powder and they got the most heat from it). Maybe you could also evaluate the quality based on the heat it throws offs, if there's a noticable difference. Thanks!
Guest
 

Re: Prices & quality of nut coal

PostBy: Richard S. On: Mon Oct 24, 2005 4:45 am

As I mentioned in another post you can't necessarily go by how it looks, I've seen some pretty bad looking product that burned fine. The ashes are subjective to the type of stove your burning it in. You should get a very powdery ash from a hand fired stove, the same cannot be said of stokers.

We have a stoker and a small hand fired unit in the basement. The stoker will produce a chunky, powdery ash whereas the hand fired unit will burn it to the point that it's almost talcum powder like. That's from the very same coal coming from the same bin, same delivery etc. Don't expect a stoker to burn it to the point that it's complete ash.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

PostBy: Oil Region On: Mon Nov 14, 2005 3:12 am

NEPA,
Are you suggesting that the hand fired units burn the coal more efficiently, or just that they burn differently than a stoker unit?

Troy
Oil Region
 

PostBy: Richard S. On: Mon Nov 14, 2005 8:35 am

Oil Region wrote:or just that they burn differently than a stoker unit?


The ashes they produce will be different, for efficiency you'll need to compare the units themselves and how they are used.

I had a customer with a "Heatrolla" which is a simple hand fired unit built back in the ?50's?. It looks similar to a Victrolla record player hence the name, these units are very inefficient but being a hand fired stove will burn the coal to nothing. He switched to a stoker and reduced his coal consumption to nearly half of what he was using.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Storing Hard Coal

PostBy: talleyman On: Thu Dec 18, 2014 12:53 pm

I have the opportunity to get a "room full of coal" free from a guy who has an old house up in the mountains here in Colorado. He says it is in a storage room in the basement and has been there for years. The house was converted to a gas furnace long ago he says. He does not know what kind of coal it is and it is a 1.5 hr drive for me to get there, so he sent me this picture below. He says it's "hard as a rock, and shiny" which leads me to believe it's Anthracite but I'm not sure

Can anyone tell from the picture if this looks like Anthracite or Bituminous coal? I have no idea what size it is, he said it was like "gravel" so maybe it's nut size:
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talleyman
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Royal Acorn 45 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Blaschack Stove-Size

Re: Storing Hard Coal

PostBy: Starting Out On: Thu Dec 18, 2014 1:08 pm

Shiny, it looks like anthracite, nut will be about the size of a golf ball, pea will be about the size of a quarter, buckwheat about the size of a dime, rice about the size of a kernel of corn.
Starting Out
 
Other Heating: Burnham Oil Boiler with Beckett Gun

Re: Storing Hard Coal

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Dec 18, 2014 3:24 pm

talleyman wrote:He does not know what kind of coal it is and it is a 1.5 hr drive for me to get there, so he sent me this picture below. He says it's "hard as a rock, and shiny" which leads me to believe it's Anthracite but I'm not sure


Could you have him put a dollar bill in the picture so you can reference size against it? Gravel size sounds to me like rice or buckwheat size. Its hard to say if its bit or anthracite from the picture.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: Storing Hard Coal

PostBy: Scottscoaled On: Thu Dec 18, 2014 5:05 pm

Do they actually have Anthracite in Colorado???????
Scottscoaled
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520x3, 700 Van Wert 800
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: EFM 150, Keystoker 150
Coal Size/Type: Lots of buck

Re: Storing Hard Coal

PostBy: talleyman On: Thu Dec 18, 2014 7:10 pm

Scottscoaled wrote:Do they actually have Anthracite in Colorado???????


Yes, there is Anthracite in Crested Butte, Colorado but the mine has been closed for a long time due to safety issues at the mine. I was thinking this guy's coal is possibly from that mine but it's probably really old.

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/ref/collection/p15330coll21/id/6499


Hmm...this Crested Butte tourism guide (page 8) says the mine closed in 1952, so I would doubt his coal could be from that long ago:

http://www.gunnisoncrestedbutte.com/site/static/pdfs/G-CB_Heritage_Driving_Tour.pdf

"In 1884, after the Jokerville Mine disaster, Big Mine operated until 1952 on the bench just above town, once an industrial
landscape with numerous buildings related to the operation of the mine, including a powerhouse, a repair shop, showers, a mule
barn, offices, employee housing and the tipple system to get the coal to the coke ovens and the train. Big Mine produced a high
quality anthracite coal
and was aptly named as it employed the majority of men in Crested Butte. In the summer, a few of the
foundations for the tipple can be seen at the base of the bench, and the ground is still dark from residual coal."
talleyman
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Royal Acorn 45 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Blaschack Stove-Size

Re: Storing Hard Coal

PostBy: Berlin On: Thu Dec 18, 2014 7:59 pm

It could be anthracite or high quality/ nicely sized bit coal.
Berlin
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal