baromertic damper??

baromertic damper??

PostBy: carlherrnstein On: Thu Mar 01, 2012 11:17 pm

I am starting to gather the parts I will need to swap my wondercoal for a vigilant II and I have been considering using a baro damper but the online manual warns to not use a baro damper. It says that the flue can be cooled to the point that it won't draw, I am unsure if its possible to do that.

Can anyone advise?
carlherrnstein
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: combustioneer model 77B
Coal Size/Type: pea stoker/Ohio bituminous

Re: baromertic damper??

PostBy: LsFarm On: Fri Mar 02, 2012 12:13 am

How strong is your draft? Do you have a manometer to measure your draft?

Greg L.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: baromertic damper??

PostBy: Coalfire On: Fri Mar 02, 2012 7:03 am

I would save the money and do with out it. The manual say not to, so with that in mind looking at the manual it has an internal damper. That along with the thermostat will be a perfect combo. If your draft goes up raising the firebox temp the tsat will close, making it harder to draw the heat up the chimney.


I would use as designed, and see how it does for the first year.


Eric
Coalfire
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 96K btu Circulator
Coal Size/Type: Nut


Re: baromertic damper??

PostBy: carlherrnstein On: Fri Mar 02, 2012 8:19 am

I have know idea what my draft is, I don't have a manometer. I think I will go without a baro I think the engineers that designed the stove probably knew want they were doing.
carlherrnstein
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: combustioneer model 77B
Coal Size/Type: pea stoker/Ohio bituminous

Re: baromertic damper??

PostBy: Freddy On: Fri Mar 02, 2012 11:15 am

I'm going to shoot a guess that the engineers were thinking about burning wood in the Vigilant. If you are burning wood, then, for sure, skip the baro damper, but if you are burning only coal, then I'd surely get a Dwyer #25 manometer and do things right. A properly adjusted barometric damper will save fuel. Think of it this way..if you do not have a barometric damper then when the draft is a bit high (windy day, cold weather, hotter fire) then you are losing heat up the chimney. Some people think a barometric damper loses heat up the chimney, but it's more like this: Would you rather lose 500 degree stove air up the chimney or lose 72 degree house air up the chimney?
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: baromertic damper??

PostBy: Lightning On: Fri Mar 02, 2012 2:09 pm

I love what my barometric damper does for my furnace. I get a nice steady heat output for 12+ hours. Its by far the best thing I've done to make my burning more manageable. I also agree that the room air going up the chimney is being replaced by air seeping in from outside, which is fine with me since my furnace is in the basement.

I'm sure there is good reason not to, my question is for those of you that have their appliance in their living space. So why not put the barometric damper at the bottom of the stack outside??
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: baromertic damper??

PostBy: carlherrnstein On: Fri Mar 02, 2012 3:42 pm

The vigilant II 2310 is made to be a coal stove I dont know about the earlier vigilants. Im planing on burning bituminous thru it. I am concerned about cooling the pipe and losing draft. From what iv been abel to gather about this model of stove its similar to the base burners of 100 years ago it has a flaper you close to run the gases around the sides of the stove insted of right up the flue.

I'll give it some more thought. Im planning on using the rear exit with a "T" and a clean out on the back side so i can reach in there with a vacuum hose to clean out the soot. I might be able to put a baro damper in place of a cap in the "T".

Iv never seen a baro damper other than in pictures, do they fit on a "T" or are they fixed in there own peice of black pipe?

Thanks for the input please keep it coming
carlherrnstein
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: combustioneer model 77B
Coal Size/Type: pea stoker/Ohio bituminous

Re: baromertic damper??

PostBy: Berlin On: Fri Mar 02, 2012 5:35 pm

I'm not a huge fan of using a baro on hand-fired bit installations, but, for many people it works well. Using BIG lumps of coal instead of stoker or ROM will prevent most backpuffing (which can lead to soot covering the house when using a baro). Just make sure you order the stove with the 8" collar and use 8" connecting pipe to your flue - you'll be MUCH happier in the longrun; avoid 6"!
Berlin
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal

Re: baromertic damper??

PostBy: LsFarm On: Fri Mar 02, 2012 6:21 pm

Since you are planning on burning Bituminous coal, check your manual and make sure that is not prohibited. If this stove is the type with multiple passageways internally in the stove.. I'd not recommend burning Bit coal in it.. Only Anthracite.
Is this stove equiped with a top load coal hopper or Magazine? If so, do NOT burn Bit coal with the hopper, the whole hopper-full of coal will catch fire.
Coal Hoppers or Magazines are for Anthracite ONLY.

If burning Bit coal,, don't install a Barometric damper. When a fresh load of coal is added to the fire, you will get soot and exhaust out the damper for a few minutes.. Not what you want.

Greg L.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland