"New" stove coming for my home

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: half-pint On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 2:20 am

2001Sierra wrote:That is not a stove. It is a trophy :!:


You are right it is a trophy. But it is a 103 year old trophy that is going back to work doing what it was designed to do. ;)
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: half-pint On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 2:30 am

Have a question for everyone on this. My stove got a new set of triangular grates in it's restoration. Would like to hear some expert opinions on how to season these three sided grates for service before the heating season gets going. Going to be setting up my stovepipes here over the weekend. First time the temp drops below 50F here night or day I plan to warm this 'ol girl up just for the simple fact of doing it. I may have to keep the A/C on too, but I am impatient and a can't wait to try my hand at this stove.
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: freetown fred On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 5:49 am

I don't know about all that EXPERT stuff, but putting them in the oven for as long & at whatever temp makes you happy should & has worked well. 3 yrs ago I put new grates in my Hitzer & just let them run their course as the season progressed--no problems there. Of course I treat my stove like a good woman also. ;) I'm a firm believer in--break her in like you're gonna use her :)
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

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Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: carlherrnstein On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 7:47 am

The first few of fires I had in my new stove were wood fires that was cause it wasnt really cold out. I'm not sure how important it is to be super particular about "seasoning" your stove grates. The important thing with any cast iron is to not heat or cool it too quickly.
carlherrnstein
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: combustioneer model 77B
Coal Size/Type: pea stoker/Ohio bituminous

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 8:39 am

carlherrnstein wrote:The first few of fires I had in my new stove were wood fires that was cause it wasnt really cold out. I'm not sure how important it is to be super particular about "seasoning" your stove grates. The important thing with any cast iron is to not heat or cool it too quickly.


That's right and so is Fred's suggestion of just using the the stove. There is really no need to 'season" the grates at all. If anything, it would be the paint and possibly the lining of your fire pot (if it's new) that you "season a bit. The paint will "cure' and might be little smoky/smelly as the volatile ingredients burn off. If the refractory lining is new like in my 116, you should have a small wood fire a couple times before a full on coal fire to cure it up. It's not a huge deal though and since mine has been drying all summer, it's set up pretty well right now. When I did my cookstove, it was right before the heating season and because it so close, I had a couple small wood fires to help the cure.
In your case I wouldn't worry about anything except to open some windows to vent the paint fumes. Don't forget your MPD in the stovepipe. I used an angle grinder with a thin cut off wheel to cut the pipe and it worked well. Used a chalk line around the pipe to mark it then just clamped it gently into my jawhorse and cut around turning the pipe a few times. Then a small file to remove the burr and you'r good to go. Male side down is the preferable direction when assembling pipe for any drip (even though we don't have to worry about creosote). ;)

If you haven't seen it, here's the link to the page where I hooked mine up the other day.
http://nepacrossroads.com/download/file ... &mode=view
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: carlherrnstein On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 8:56 am

I used a big hoseclamp, that was laying around, on my pipe i just moved it around till it looked right then cut next to it with aviation shears.
carlherrnstein
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: combustioneer model 77B
Coal Size/Type: pea stoker/Ohio bituminous

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 9:38 am

carlherrnstein wrote:I used a big hoseclamp, that was laying around, on my pipe i just moved it around till it looked right then cut next to it with aviation shears.


That is how i was going to do it too, but I couldn't find my aviation pipe snips. Only had right cutters which would have been a pain, so I went with the wheel. It was fast and worked well but it wore a new wheel just about half it's size by the time I was done. Must be that sharp edge?
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: half-pint On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 8:22 pm

SteveZee wrote:
carlherrnstein wrote:The first few of fires I had in my new stove were wood fires that was cause it wasnt really cold out. I'm not sure how important it is to be super particular about "seasoning" your stove grates. The important thing with any cast iron is to not heat or cool it too quickly.


That's right and so is Fred's suggestion of just using the the stove. There is really no need to 'season" the grates at all. If anything, it would be the paint and possibly the lining of your fire pot (if it's new) that you "season a bit. The paint will "cure' and might be little smoky/smelly as the volatile ingredients burn off. If the refractory lining is new like in my 116, you should have a small wood fire a couple times before a full on coal fire to cure it up. It's not a huge deal though and since mine has been drying all summer, it's set up pretty well right now. When I did my cookstove, it was right before the heating season and because it so close, I had a couple small wood fires to help the cure.
In your case I wouldn't worry about anything except to open some windows to vent the paint fumes. Don't forget your MPD in the stovepipe. I used an angle grinder with a thin cut off wheel to cut the pipe and it worked well. Used a chalk line around the pipe to mark it then just clamped it gently into my jawhorse and cut around turning the pipe a few times. Then a small file to remove the burr and you'r good to go. Male side down is the preferable direction when assembling pipe for any drip (even though we don't have to worry about creosote). ;)

If you haven't seen it, here's the link to the page where I hooked mine up the other day.
http://nepacrossroads.com/download/file ... &mode=view


Steve,
Doug did a great job with mine but I think in a side by side contest yours looks the best. I do know this you and me have got two great stoves for the upcoming season. I know we will both be thrilled with them. I'm going to have to get some of the polish you used as it did a fantastic job. I really like it's look as it's not too glossy but flat either.
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: wsherrick On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 9:51 pm

I know you are excited and the days are going to drag slowly until it is cool enough to light the stove. I feel the same way every year. I look forward to the Fall and the first fire.
I would recommend that you light a few small wood or charcoal fires in the stove first. The lining in the fire pot needs to cure also. Even though it appears dry there is still embedded moisture in it.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: half-pint On: Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:19 pm

wsherrick wrote:I know you are excited and the days are going to drag slowly until it is cool enough to light the stove. I feel the same way every year. I look forward to the Fall and the first fire.
I would recommend that you light a few small wood or charcoal fires in the stove first. The lining in the fire pot needs to cure also. Even though it appears dry there is still embedded moisture in it.


I figure I might cut the 1x1's they used for the frame of the crate it came in and cut them into short ( 1 foot ) pieces to use for curing fires. My firewood I have is in longer 18 -20 in pieces. Do small fires that burn for a shorter time and are cooler and work my way up to longer hotter fires.
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: half-pint On: Tue Sep 04, 2012 8:34 pm

Well, I am two curing fires in. Coal has been bought for the upcoming season, chimney has been cleaned, pipes are cleaned and repainted, all pipe joints are sealed, and new chimney cap is in place. I think I am ready for cool weather. All I have left is to install vents in the floor to help with getting the heat upstairs and I'll be able to sit back and relax a bit. Have two containers set up I'm going to put a quart of kerosene in each and put some coal in one and charcoal in the other. That way I have some that is soaked and easy to light any time I need it.
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: 2001Sierra On: Tue Sep 04, 2012 9:40 pm

Please ask questions before cutting holes. Been there done that and neighbor way more than me. Heat rises but heavy cold air falls, so things do not work as many of us think it should :oops:
Last edited by 2001Sierra on Tue Sep 04, 2012 10:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
2001Sierra
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90 Chimney vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Buderus Oil Boiler 3115-34
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker 90 Chimney Vent

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: half-pint On: Tue Sep 04, 2012 9:50 pm

2001Sierra wrote:Please ask questions before cutting holes. Been there done that and neighbor way more than me. Heat rises but heavy cold air falls, so things do not work as many of think it should :oops:

I was thinking about a couple of grates close to the stove to allow heat to rise and then one in the each back room to allow cooler air to return to the basement. Tell me what you think.
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: SteveZee On: Wed Sep 05, 2012 9:09 am

Sierra is right Half-pint, When working with registers, you want to think in terms of the cold air sinking versus the warm rising. Wait till it gets chilly and you have the stove going a couple or three days and then find the cold spots. Put a register close to the cold areas. That gives the cold air a route to sink and will pull the warm air into it's place. This will begin the convection flow. Otherwise you are just guessing and may end up with ineffective registers.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: "New" stove coming for my home

PostBy: half-pint On: Wed Sep 05, 2012 6:49 pm

Ok will do... I know there is one vent that is going in for sure. My living room used to be a one car carport. Therefore it has no heat or a/c vents at all. I'm putting a vent equipped with a fan in there to force heat into that room. In winter it along with the two back rooms are usually at around 65-67 while the rest of the house that is closer to the stove are at 71-72. The basement however is usually around 74 on the end farther from the stove and can reach 80 at times on the end with the stove.
half-pint
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: US Stove / Wondercoal
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 Baseburner
Coal Size/Type: Stove sized Anthracite / WV Bituminous

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