My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Jan 03, 2013 2:01 pm

PJT wrote:Hi Steve

Whats the tending interval at 500 degrees?


Well, I've been on the same schedule but there is allot more ash if I don't do a semi couple scoops and small shake at 12 hours if the stove has been running over 500°. That makes it a longer recovery time if I don't throw some on and a light shake. It's also possible that it's this year's coal is not as good as last. There seems to be allot of ash this year compared to last and allot of the chunks are the dull sort of fines covered ones versus shiny glistening bits. We'll see because I'm going to try a couple bags of some other stuff and see if there is a difference. I have a feeling this load is of lesser quality. Will report.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Jan 03, 2013 2:02 pm

LsFarm wrote:Steve, I know you probably don't want to 'get modern' but a small box fan blowing over each of the stoves will wash a lot more heat off the exterior and into the house.. and of course you could put the fans away for summer cooling after the OAT rises above +5 !! :lol:

Greg L

Ha,ha,ha, yep Greg not a bad idea. :D
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: PJT On: Thu Jan 03, 2013 2:08 pm

I thought you already were on a 12 hour schedule....how often were you reloading before this latest cold snap?
PJT
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane

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Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: wsherrick On: Thu Jan 03, 2013 4:36 pm

SteveZee wrote:
LsFarm wrote:Steve, I know you probably don't want to 'get modern' but a small box fan blowing over each of the stoves will wash a lot more heat off the exterior and into the house.. and of course you could put the fans away for summer cooling after the OAT rises above +5 !! :lol:

Greg L

Ha,ha,ha, yep Greg not a bad idea. :D


A small fan turned upwards toward the ceiling will give good results. A lot of the heat is up there.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Jan 03, 2013 5:29 pm

PJT wrote:I thought you already were on a 12 hour schedule....how often were you reloading before this latest cold snap?

Yep I have been on the 12 hr schedule. As It's gotten colder and with this snap, I have thrown in a scoop or two and a light shake at maybe 6 hrs to avoid the heavy fill at 12 hours and longer recovery time. This during the day when I'm here.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: echos67 On: Thu Jan 03, 2013 8:22 pm

SteveZee wrote:Keith, Not to bad. It was brutal cold last night even without the wind chill. about -4 before and -teens with. The stoves were both cranked, about 500° for the 116 and 450° in the kitchen and the house was about 67° I would that's pretty close to the max though but how often does it get that low and how long does it stay there? I could probably get a touch more out of them but I figure of it's below -5, I'll bite the bullet and turn the furnace on to help a little. Running at + 500 the tending time gets shorter or else recovery is longer with a big load. The differance between +5 and -5 feels like allot!


Glad they are working for you Steve, maybe a Glenwood 8 would give you a little more wiggle room in that large house :D ?
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Fri Jan 04, 2013 9:46 am

echos67 wrote:
SteveZee wrote:Keith, Not to bad. It was brutal cold last night even without the wind chill. about -4 before and -teens with. The stoves were both cranked, about 500° for the 116 and 450° in the kitchen and the house was about 67° I would that's pretty close to the max though but how often does it get that low and how long does it stay there? I could probably get a touch more out of them but I figure of it's below -5, I'll bite the bullet and turn the furnace on to help a little. Running at + 500 the tending time gets shorter or else recovery is longer with a big load. The differance between +5 and -5 feels like allot!


Glad they are working for you Steve, maybe a Glenwood 8 would give you a little more wiggle room in that large house :D ?


Possible Keith , I wouldn't kick one out ;)
This morning it was -3 and when I came down the house was felt warmer than yesterday and in fact was. The stove was right at 625° which for some reason I couldn't get it to the previous day. I think it was a bit ash bridged/bound or had some clinkers that were slowing me down? Wide open wouldn't go past 500 which wasn't right. Last night I gave it a good poking/shaking at about 10pm and filled it up with straight stove coal avoiding the part of the pile with the small nut and fines in it. Big difference this morning and my primaries were only about half throttle :D I think it's fine if you don't give it too much fine :P
I could certainly benifit with tightening up this old place a bit too. The original windows and doors don't help the cause. The fact that it can go below zero and I can hang with no furnace help is pretty cool because it doesn't happen all that much.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: nortcan On: Fri Jan 04, 2013 4:21 pm

Super Steve. Good stoves is important fo the best results as good windows, insulation...""the cheapest energy is the one we don't need"". :)
An old house is not easy to improve about energy efficiency but like you said good windows and sealing the small air leaks here and there can make a big difference on the heating needs and on the confort. :roll:
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: echos67 On: Fri Jan 04, 2013 6:25 pm

625* is starting to get up there, the highest I have had mine was 550* and I think it was DJ that ran his in the 700* plus for quite a while :D.

I bet you would notice a huge difference if those windows were replaced, not to mention it is quieter inside the house as well.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 9:25 am

echos67 wrote:625* is starting to get up there, the highest I have had mine was 550* and I think it was DJ that ran his in the 700* plus for quite a while :D.

I bet you would notice a huge difference if those windows were replaced, not to mention it is quieter inside the house as well.


I think so Keith and Pierre. That would be the best thing I could do because honestly the stoves can cover down to below zero and it's not below zero all that much here. I like the old windows with the wavy glass and someone told me that the old wooden storm windows, the kind you have to put on and take off each season were as good as thermopane as far as insulating value goes. I have some of these on the back of the house and they have been on forever. It's the front and side where they were replaced with aluminum storm windows which are useless. Some salesman made a big payday back in the 70's or whenever down here because allot of people had them. ;) I have found 5-6 (numbered) wooden storms up above my garage with a pile of old shutters. I need to see which ones they covered and maybe look around for some others. The doors are old originals too and deffinately could be upgraded for a large savings in heat loss I'm sure. All of this would ease the burden and make it easier on the stoves. It's that old stubborn "they are original" thing that gets in the way. That and the big bucks to replace them! :P
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 1:12 pm

SteveZee wrote:
echos67 wrote:625* is starting to get up there, the highest I have had mine was 550* and I think it was DJ that ran his in the 700* plus for quite a while :D.

I bet you would notice a huge difference if those windows were replaced, not to mention it is quieter inside the house as well.


I think so Keith and Pierre. That would be the best thing I could do because honestly the stoves can cover down to below zero and it's not below zero all that much here. I like the old windows with the wavy glass and someone told me that the old wooden storm windows, the kind you have to put on and take off each season were as good as thermopane as far as insulating value goes. I have some of these on the back of the house and they have been on forever. It's the front and side where they were replaced with aluminum storm windows which are useless. Some salesman made a big payday back in the 70's or whenever down here because allot of people had them. ;) I have found 5-6 (numbered) wooden storms up above my garage with a pile of old shutters. I need to see which ones they covered and maybe look around for some others. The doors are old originals too and deffinately could be upgraded for a large savings in heat loss I'm sure. All of this would ease the burden and make it easier on the stoves. It's that old stubborn "they are original" thing that gets in the way. That and the big bucks to replace them! :P


I was going to stay out of this discussion, but since you said this----thank GOD you said it. The windows are one of the most important parts to a house. If not the most important. There are many ways to repair the original windows.
Changing the windows in an old house-DESTROYS IT'. You might as well burn it down after that. Once you take out the windows the original character of a house is gone forever. When I was consulting people as an Appraiser years ago, I would tell them- If you can't respect the historic nature of a fine old home and want to modify it and destroy any reason to preserve it in first place. DON"T BUY IT. Get a yuppie McMansion.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 1:30 pm

William is right about the windows !

It has been suggested to me to replace my sash windows with vinyl ones ... But not in a million years will I replace my real wooden sash windows with plastic crap! My sash windows aren't the problem but the plastic metal crap of a sunroom that someone turned my porch into then took the frot of the house down is! Sash windows do take some time to restore but are well worth the effort! I even replaced mine with the same rope they would have had originally! The same company still make the stuff! Go figure! The PO did put up storm windows but I have been debating on replacing them with functioning shutters. The storm windows, I guess , do the trick though. I dot get any drafts from my windows . I have heard the same about wooden "storm" or screen Inserts as well. It's unfortunate that my house has been altered so much .
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 6:24 pm

I would have changed them out along time ago if I was really serious. Some are in good shape but some need attention. Reglazing, and new counter weight ropes and refits. Got a couple rattlers in high winds so those are first. The good news in the wooden storm windows I found will almost cove them all. I think I'm about 3-4 short. They will need re-felting and glazing also but that's no biggie. I need to try and match them up since they have lead plugs with number that I assume correspond to a window. I'll need the hanging hardware too for the tops. They are held tight by large eyelets that you tighten and those are still there albeit with a few coats of paint on them.

The front door is a beauty and have pre-civil war etched glass panel lites on each side. That can be helped with a tight storm door outside of it to replace the old aluminum one that's pretty useless. There is also a wooden cover (like an old storm door) that slid into place in the winter that I still have in the barn also but it's quite dark with that on.

The fact that the two stove can hang down to -5 so far amazes me. It doesn't get much colder on the coast here and hardly gets that cold very often. Bit of a micro climate due to the proximity to the ocean. Five miles inland it's another story but here is about 5-10° warmer in winter and cooler in summer.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 6:35 pm

SteveZee wrote:I would have changed them out along time ago if I was really serious. Some are in good shape but some need attention. Reglazing, and new counter weight ropes and refits. Got a couple rattlers in high winds so those are first. The good news in the wooden storm windows I found will almost cove them all. I think I'm about 3-4 short. They will need re-felting and glazing also but that's no biggie. I need to try and match them up since they have lead plugs with number that I assume correspond to a window. I'll need the hanging hardware too for the tops. They are held tight by large eyelets that you tighten and those are still there albeit with a few coats of paint on them.

The front door is a beauty and have pre-civil war etched glass panel lites on each side. That can be helped with a tight storm door outside of it to replace the old aluminum one that's pretty useless. There is also a wooden cover (like an old storm door) that slid into place in the winter that I still have in the barn also but it's quite dark with that on.

The fact that the two stove can hang down to -5 so far amazes me. It doesn't get much colder on the coast here and hardly gets that cold very often. Bit of a micro climate due to the proximity to the ocean. Five miles inland it's another story but here is about 5-10° warmer in winter and cooler in summer.


Let me know if you need any salvaged parts. There are a lot here including weights .
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sat Jan 05, 2013 10:04 pm

Thanks Josh, I'll keepnthat in mind.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

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