My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: echos67 On: Fri Jan 18, 2013 6:18 pm

SteveZee wrote:
echos67 wrote:First I saw this Steve, I'm sure they are making a large difference if you have enough of them installed.


Keith, yeah they are working really well. Because they have the film on both sides, you have that dead air space within the frame itself and another between the storm window and the house window. R factor close to 3 (R2.8) which isn't bad considering a thermo pane window is R3.3. I put some 3" packing tape "tabs" also, to have something to pull them off when you remove them. Each one is marked for it's individual window although some are interchangeable with windows that were perfectly square. These were a 5 window test for the kitchen and My Mom's downstairs bedroom. Based on this, I will go ahead and make more for all the windows in the heating space.

It is currently 1° outside and the 116 is running at 450° , the range is 350°and we're at 70° downstairs. That is at least 50° less for the same temp as the last time it was this cold.


That is a huge difference in the stove running temp of 50* less, I guess I know what you will be doing to the rest of the windows :lol: ! I have something similar on the screened porch here, I have large plexi-glass panels I install in the winter and they keep the wind away, when the sun is out that porch really heats up and we can open the door the let the free heat inside.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: pma On: Sun Feb 10, 2013 10:06 pm

wsherrick wrote:See how nice these look with the proper coat of stove polish. Once you do something like this, the stove becomes an extension of yourself, your time, thought and effort. It's more than just a heater, it's an expression that you have put your identity into. Plus it has the added weight of being a hundred plus years old. It is a connection to the past and present at the same time. It is also besides being just utilitarian, a work of of art and you are keeping faith with the craftsmanship that those long dead have put into it. There is a presence these things possess that no new item has no matter what it does. If someone doesn't understand it, or have the respect due to what it represents; then it can't be explained to them.


Greetings William, thought I ought to pass on a 'thanks' for taking the time to make your videos-I've passed them on to several people. The above is very eloquent! well said! ...I got the stove bug a few years back when I lugged home a Glenwood 'C' cookstove someone was just trashing on the side of the road. I enjoy many aspects of these stoves- refurbishing them is so enjoyable because the transformation is so gratifying. Lug a rusty old stove home in pieces and people look at you out of the corner of their eye and begin to wonder...show them finished product and they're reluctant to believe it's the same stove. I find these stoves extremely visually appealing too. Sellers often try to push various items as a 'conversation piece' ...these stoves truly are. I visited Emery at Stove Hospital a few years back with my girlfriend- he's very helpful with sound advice- his place is my concept of the ideal afterlife!...would have loved to apprentice under him 20 years ago [when I had more spring in my step]. Thanks too Steve for posting this thread -giving a visual 'how to' is priceless. I'll be attempting a rehab of a Glenwood 6 later this year. Hope to tap this forum for lots of advice in the future...
Last edited by pma on Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
pma
 
Baseburners & Antiques: glenwood 6 baseheater [not refurbished] ...Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Stove/Furnace Make: glenwood

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:12 am

You are quite welcome Paul and I'm glad you've joined the forum. This is great place to share experiences with these pieces of history. The very fact that they are still around is testament to how well they were made IMO.
There is an addicting factor too as you well know! We all try and help each other and that translates into a pay it forward kind of mentality. Great bunch and a wealth of knowledge and experience. You already know your way around a stove pretty well and the fact that you rescued that 208C off the side of the road tells me that you "get it". ;)
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: Photog200 On: Thu Feb 14, 2013 9:41 pm

SteveZee wrote:Greg, Thanks yep I'm really interested too in seeing the difference in performance.

I used the "putty" or ramming compound as they call it to re-line the firepot. It was the same stuff I used on the range in the kitchen since I had a half a box left. It's called Noxram and is pretty easy to use. I've attached a pix of the new lining.

As far as the finish goes, I used William's Stove Polish. This is IMO, the best stuff around. It's completely old school (like our buddy William), as it is just graphite in solution, but what separates it from the rest is there is no wax in it that burns off. It has a nice dull semi flat look to it. It was easier to do each piece at a time too. I considered painting with an HVLP unit and stove paint first but decided to try this alone and see how it goes since I always use this stuff anyways even after paint and on my cookstove top.

I'll get into the re-assembly when I have some time tonight.

Where can you buy Noxram? Have not had much luck finding it anywhere.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: ashburnham55 On: Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:06 pm

Give Hanyan-Higgins a try. They are listed as supplier of Plibrico. Ask for "Super Air-Bond F"

Hanyan-Higgins Company
7397 Taft Park Dr.
East Syracuse, NY 13057
(315) 458-2033
ashburnham55
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Crown 112
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Magee

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: Photog200 On: Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:24 pm

ashburnham55 wrote:Give Hanyan-Higgins a try. They are listed as supplier of Plibrico. Ask for "Super Air-Bond F"

Hanyan-Higgins Company
7397 Taft Park Dr.
East Syracuse, NY 13057
(315) 458-2033

Bill, was that message for me as to where I can get the refractory material?
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: ashburnham55 On: Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:33 pm

Yes it was --> The Plibrico worked well and was easy to work with.
ashburnham55
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Crown 112
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Magee

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: Photog200 On: Fri Feb 15, 2013 6:11 am

ashburnham55 wrote:Yes it was --> The Plibrico worked well and was easy to work with.

Thank you Sir, I work in Syracuse so it will be easy to check on it.
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sun Feb 17, 2013 12:58 am

Excellent! That's the same stuff as the Noxram.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: Photog200 On: Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:38 pm

SteveZee wrote:Excellent! That's the same stuff as the Noxram.

I was able to pick this stuff up today...no instructions with it. Do you have to let it cure for any length of time before putting a fire in it to do the final cure? Or can I do the small fire right away?

Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: ashburnham55 On: Tue Feb 19, 2013 8:51 pm

To cure the liner, I used a tip from another member on the forum and used about 6 cans of sterno and placed them into the ash pan and closed the doors on the stove. Within about four hours the liner was fully cured and was left with a perfect liner.

I found this link which has instructions on how to install both Plibrico and Chicago Fire Brick Super Air Bonds

http://www.fssperry.com/PDF_Documents/P ... lation.pdf




Tips on how to install the liner.

Tools --> 3 lbs rubber mallet, a small putty knife and a flat shovel.

After you open the box and remove the block of refractory from the bag I used a flat shovel to slice off 1" slabs of material as I went along.
I was told this tip from Brandon at the Stove Hospital and it worked very well


The instructions state that you should hammer the cement to 100% of it's thickness. In other words if you want a 1 inch liner, start with 2 inches of material and compress it by hammering down to a the 1 inch thickness that you desired.

Don't worry, you have plenty of time to work with the refractory. --> cures very slowly.

What I did.

I first measured the liner height I wanted the liner to be which was 12 inches and divided it by 4 which came out to 3 inches. I then used an old plank that was the same thickness that I wanted the liner to be and plunged cut a rectangle out of the middle that was 3 inches by 10 inches. This allowed me to handle the material in small workable pieces. Next, I sliced off 1 inch thick slabs off of the block of refractory and laid them into the opening of the form making sure that I doubled up the thickness of the material. I then hammered the material into the opening of the form until I fully compressed it down to the thickness of the plank. I then used a small putting knife to remove the rectangle 3"X12" piece out of the form and laid the first piece of the liner into the fire pot. I repeated the steps over and over again trimming the pieces when needed and worked my way up the fire pot until it was fully lined. After I went over all the seams with small hand fulls of the material and worked it into any cracks by hand. I finally went over the whole liner with a 1" putty knife and a little bit of water pulling upward to smooth out the liner.

Curing the liner --> I waited a full week before I attempted to cure the liner and did not run into any issues at all. The material stayed soft to the touch until the day it was cured. Using I a tip from another member on the forum I used about 6 cans of sterno and placed them into the ash pan and closed the doors on the stove. Within about four hours the liner was fully cured and was left with a perfect liner.

I found the refractory incredibly easy to work with and was able to shape it anyway you want it with very little effort.



Bill
Attachments
0219131902.jpg
(129.91 KiB) Viewed 12 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]40726[/nepathumb]
ashburnham55
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Crown 112
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Magee

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: Photog200 On: Tue Feb 19, 2013 11:09 pm

ashburnham55 wrote:To cure the liner, I used a tip from another member on the forum and used about 6 cans of sterno and placed them into the ash pan and closed the doors on the stove. Within about four hours the liner was fully cured and was left with a perfect liner.

I found this link which has instructions on how to install both Plibrico and Chicago Fire Brick Super Air Bonds

http://www.fssperry.com/PDF_Documents/P ... lation.pdf




Tips on how to install the liner.

Tools --> 3 lbs rubber mallet, a small putty knife and a flat shovel.

After you open the box and remove the block of refractory from the bag I used a flat shovel to slice off 1" slabs of material as I went along.
I was told this tip from Brandon at the Stove Hospital and it worked very well


The instructions state that you should hammer the cement to 100% of it's thickness. In other words if you want a 1 inch liner, start with 2 inches of material and compress it by hammering down to a the 1 inch thickness that you desired.

Don't worry, you have plenty of time to work with the refractory. --> cures very slowly.

What I did.

I first measured the liner height I wanted the liner to be which was 12 inches and divided it by 4 which came out to 3 inches. I then used an old plank that was the same thickness that I wanted the liner to be and plunged cut a rectangle out of the middle that was 3 inches by 10 inches. This allowed me to handle the material in small workable pieces. Next, I sliced off 1 inch thick slabs off of the block of refractory and laid them into the opening of the form making sure that I doubled up the thickness of the material. I then hammered the material into the opening of the form until I fully compressed it down to the thickness of the plank. I then used a small putting knife to remove the rectangle 3"X12" piece out of the form and laid the first piece of the liner into the fire pot. I repeated the steps over and over again trimming the pieces when needed and worked my way up the fire pot until it was fully lined. After I went over all the seams with small hand fulls of the material and worked it into any cracks by hand. I finally went over the whole liner with a 1" putty knife and a little bit of water pulling upward to smooth out the liner.

Curing the liner --> I waited a full week before I attempted to cure the liner and did not run into any issues at all. The material stayed soft to the touch until the day it was cured. Using I a tip from another member on the forum I used about 6 cans of sterno and placed them into the ash pan and closed the doors on the stove. Within about four hours the liner was fully cured and was left with a perfect liner.

I found the refractory incredibly easy to work with and was able to shape it anyway you want it with very little effort.



Bill

That sounds easy enough...I have some sterno and will try that method. I let the fire go out tonight. The new mica glass came in so I will do both jobs at the same time.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: nortcan On: Wed Feb 20, 2013 11:23 pm

Very interesting way to make a liner :idea: Thanks.
BTW, can you tell me what is a sterno can?
Thanks
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Feb 20, 2013 11:34 pm

nortcan wrote:Very interesting way to make a liner :idea: Thanks.
BTW, can you tell me what is a sterno can?
Thanks

Sterno is a small can that is full of fuel that they put under a buffet pan to keep the food hot. I did it yesterday and it worked out well.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: My "new" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

PostBy: nortcan On: Wed Feb 20, 2013 11:54 pm

Photog200 wrote:
nortcan wrote:Very interesting way to make a liner :idea: Thanks.
BTW, can you tell me what is a sterno can?
Thanks

Sterno is a small can that is full of fuel that they put under a buffet pan to keep the food hot. I did it yesterday and it worked out well.

Thank you Sir.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Visit Hitzer Stoves