Leaks...

Leaks...

PostBy: I'm On Fire On: Wed Sep 05, 2012 9:07 am

So, last night we had some driving rain. I mean driving. It was bad. My front yard is flooded...again...as usual...but my plastic tanks are still in the ground....probably because one is full of piss and the other crap now. But I noticed two windows are leaking...bad.

One is on the north side of the living room and the other is on the opposite end of the living room on the south side. The one on the south side I have an idea; there's an unfinished awning over it and I think the water gets in past the awning...I need to put flashing on it and redo the shingles.

The other one, has no awning. Both windows the water seems to be coming in from above past the little plastic shield. Both of these windows are fairly new, replaced in 2006/2007. Anyone have an idea on how to stop them from leaking? Both windows are caulked but maybe not well enough? What should I do to determine where exactly the leak is coming from? Go outside with a hose and spray the windows?
I'm On Fire
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machines DS-1600 Hot Air Circulator

Re: Leaks...

PostBy: gaw On: Thu Sep 06, 2012 6:42 am

It is hard to tell based on your description if the windows were drop in replacements or if the old windows were completely replace with new construction type windows. If they are drop in replacements then you must determine if it is leaking between the old window frame and the replacement or is it the old window that is leaking.

Using a garden hose would be a good idea to try and find a leak and good close inspection around the window to try and see where the leak is. Drop in replacements would normally be installed against a stop and caulked. Newer new construction windows have a nailing fin and are flashed. The flashing is concealed by the siding. Older new construction windows did not have nailing fins.

Another thing to remember is that the leak could be coming from above, like the roof or a window directly above and the water travels down inside the wall and comes out at the top of these windows. You definitely have some investigating to do. Do not let the leaking continue or it will be bigger bucks down the road.
gaw
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice from Schuylkill County

Re: Leaks...

PostBy: I'm On Fire On: Thu Sep 06, 2012 9:10 am

They were new construction windows. The old frames were taken out and these were put in. New frames were built for them if I remember correctly, my wife's father actually put them in. Knowing him, they weren't put in properly and may need to be taken back out to be properly repaired. The weird thing is that the window on the north sid has never leaked before the other night and the one on the south side has leaked once before this but I recaulked (sp?) and it seemed to be fine up until the other night.

Thanks for the tips. I'll try the garden hose and see what I can come up with.
I'm On Fire
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machines DS-1600 Hot Air Circulator


Re: Leaks...

PostBy: gaw On: Thu Sep 06, 2012 7:21 pm

If you follow this link http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek_Weatherization/en_US/tech_info/install.html scroll down to the section “Residential DuPont™ Flashing Systems” you will see installation instructions for many different window types. By studying these instructions you should gain an understanding of the proper installation techniques. Although these instructions are specifically for one manufacturer’s products the concepts remain the same for similar products from other manufacturers. If you know the style window your father in law installed you can look those instructions up, if not browse over all. The most common used window today would have an integral flange but there are older style wood windows being sold without fin.

Good luck on the investigation, I hope you find the problem.
gaw
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice from Schuylkill County

Re: Leaks...

PostBy: Yanche On: Thu Sep 06, 2012 9:58 pm

In addition to the Dupont Tyvek membrane product I have use the their FlexWrap product around window and door framing. See:

http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek_Weatheriza ... rapnf.html

Several years ago I replace all the windows in my home with new construction (not replacement) Anderson windows. Before each window was install I used the FlexWrap product around the perimeter of the window opening. It's a very sticky rubbery product. You get one chance to get it stuck to the right spot. There are two products, one for straight runs and one for curves or overlaps. Properly applied there is no way water will get in. I'm very pleased with the product. Like all things, it needs to be applied carefully and properly. Be sure to study the application guides on the link "gaw" referenced. You need to use the product and procedure that applies to your wall/siding/brick/etc. Caulking is never a proper fix. You need a system the diverts water even if the caulking fails.
Yanche
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea

Re: Leaks...

PostBy: I'm On Fire On: Fri Sep 07, 2012 7:40 am

Thanks for the links guys. I'll read through them when I get to work. I appreciate it.
I'm On Fire
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machines DS-1600 Hot Air Circulator