Old Houses

Old Houses

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 10:47 am

I'd like to hear from those of us who own older homes, that would be approx. older then 75 years. I think it would be interesting to post some of the stories and pictures of work you have done or unusual situations you've encountered.

I have lots of pictures, some are slides I would have to scan, but since digital photographs arrived, I'm more camera happy then ever.

Of particular interest would be houses build using "outdated" techniques like mine (Post and Beam), which predates modern platform construction.
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Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: U235a4 On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 1:06 pm

Does built in the year 1790 count? well here a few pictures that I took real quick, pretty much all of the logs are American Chestnut. I'll get some of the outside and attic (manly mans attic), and basement later.

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Last edited by U235a4 on Sun Dec 02, 2007 2:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
U235a4
 
Stove/Furnace Make: 1958 Axeman-Anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: 260M

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: jimbo970 On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 1:16 pm

Hi, I own a home built in 1924. It was a pre\fab of it day AKA 4 square colonia. The houses were sold as kits from Sears\Roebuck. I would say that mine was assembles by amish builders though. It was built for a doctor and hi family. Aside from the usual things you run across with an older home such as ( lack of insulation, older wriring etc...) it still has the original slate roof. it is 3 stories with mag in basement level and ducted to 1st floor living area which is also at the base of the upstairway. This allows the heat pouring in to the living room to easily rise to the 2nd floor. I normally heat with oil and use this when I am away for more than 2 days which is often since I travel for work. When I am home I uses the cola stove to heat the house and so far it does a pretty good job. I know when the temps sat consistantly in the low 20's then I may need to run both ot put some logs in the wood stove in the living room. ( I dont like to use the wood stove to much as it is a small vigilant and get to about 800 degrees quickly - afraid she'll blow.

The previous owner was an engineer who did some quality renovatons to the attic(master suite) - warmest room in the house when using the radiators, a very nice sun room on the entire back of the house which encompassed the old outdoor basement entrance, so can easily get in out of lower level by just a few steps - made it easy for dealer to bring in stove this way. The kitchen was renovated and incidentally I have 3 chimnesy anfd the one that the kitchen used some time ago was blocked but the flue exisits with a concrete cap. The unused chimey is about 15' above roof line and at different angles looks as though it is leaning outward ( hate to see what would happen if it were to topple).

I will post pix at soem time for you to see some of the work that was done.
jimbo970
 


Re: Old Houses

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 1:20 pm

U235a4 wrote:Does built in the year 1790 count?.... haha I'll post pictures in a bit


Looking forward to the photos.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 1:27 pm

jimbo970 wrote:Hi, I own a home built in 1924. It was a pre\fab of it day AKA 4 square colonia. The houses were sold as kits from Sears\Roebuck. I would say that mine was assembles by amish builders though. It was built for a doctor and hi family. Aside from the usual things you run across with an older home such as ( lack of insulation, older wriring etc...) it still has the original slate roof. it is 3 stories with mag in basement level and ducted to 1st floor living area which is also at the base of the upstairway. This allows the heat pouring in to the living room to easily rise to the 2nd floor. I normally heat with oil and use this when I am away for more than 2 days which is often since I travel for work. When I am home I uses the cola stove to heat the house and so far it does a pretty good job. I know when the temps sat consistantly in the low 20's then I may need to run both ot put some logs in the wood stove in the living room. ( I dont like to use the wood stove to much as it is a small vigilant and get to about 800 degrees quickly - afraid she'll blow.

The previous owner was an engineer who did some quality renovatons to the attic(master suite) - warmest room in the house when using the radiators, a very nice sun room on the entire back of the house which encompassed the old outdoor basement entrance, so can easily get in out of lower level by just a few steps - made it easy for dealer to bring in stove this way. The kitchen was renovated and incidentally I have 3 chimnesy anfd the one that the kitchen used some time ago was blocked but the flue exisits with a concrete cap. The unused chimey is about 15' above roof line and at different angles looks as though it is leaning outward ( hate to see what would happen if it were to topple).

I will post pix at soem time for you to see some of the work that was done.


I've heard of the Sears house kits, but I never actually talked to someone who owned one. Looking forward to the photos.
Sears sold pre-fab garages also, and a car at one point, the "Allstate" which actually was a Henry J.


http://www.kfnut.com/1952models/page2.html
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: e.alleg On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 2:27 pm

mine was built 1887, I'll post some pictures later. My house has owned by the Phillips family, originally they had a 100+ acre farm and a small post and beam house and barn (both are still standing as of today), when the oil rush hit in the late 1800's they drilled about a hundred wells and built this place. A lot of the original window and door hardware is still in place, they are heavy brass ornamental pieces that you don't find anymore. Obviously they had some extra cash when they put this place together. It's old and kind of outdated but we love it.
e.alleg
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 3:44 pm

Thanks to everyone who has replied so far.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: WNY On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 4:27 pm

Good subject....we bought ours a year ago this Dec. 6 and starting to restore it. It's a 1890 Victorian, with a lot of detail on the outside and some on the inside. Some updates were done in the 40-50's (we think), It has been insulated, I replaced 23 windows so far, new electric, added a bigger garage out back, new roof and a lot of other little things to make it look a bit nicer. We have started painting the front with 7 different colors....slow but sure!

(last winter's pic)
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new colors we are working on...
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WNY
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90K, Leisure Line Hyfire I
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, LL & CoalTrol
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Hyfire I, VF3000 Soon

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 6:44 pm

Thanx WNY, I really like your house as well.
As I mentioned, I have a lot of slides of work I've done on our place, taken before I got the digital camera. I have to scan them with an old scanner I have that has a backlight for that purpose. It is a slow process, so I'll try to do some this week.
Some of the renovations I've had to do are the result of rather extensive termite damage, which was basically ignored by the previous owners. I have slides of some of that.
I think the grade around the house was lower when it was built, when I excavated for a dry well I dug up a lot of really big rocks, similar to those used for the foundation, much more then I would have expected to find in one area.

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The bottom plate on the north west corner of the house, eaten by termites. I have it covered with flashing, I have not repaired it yet. I did pour cement to reinforce the exposed foundation and to help isolate the wood from the soil.
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A sudden rush of water down the hill after a heavy rainstorm undermined the foundation of the part of the house built over a crawlspace. I excavated and poured concrete, seen in this photo. Old concrete in foreground is the 1 cellar window, was build for the coal chute years ago.
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Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: coaledsweat On: Sun Dec 02, 2007 11:21 pm

I grew up in a 1765 hip roof colonial, it was the Glebe house for a church down the road. Massive post and beam construction. I remember it was impossible to drive a spike into the beams in the attic they were so hard. Every single one would bend. I'll try to scan some pics if I can find some. It has two huge chimneys, a monster fireplace and Dutch Oven in the great room.
coaledsweat
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: traderfjp On: Mon Dec 03, 2007 12:49 am

WNY: WoW! I love old Victorians and yours is a nice one. They are building some today but most of the replicas have vinyl siding which doesn't go, imho.
traderfjp
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: traderfjp On: Mon Dec 03, 2007 12:51 am

U2345: I love how rustic the interior walls are. What is in between each timber? How do you deal with heating and plumbig with those walls?
traderfjp
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: WNY On: Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:06 am

Ours was actually a foreclosure, bank owned for over a year and vacant. Luckily, they left the electric and heat on, so nothing go damaged.!! We were at the right place at the right time.....

Thanks all! I am even going to clabboard the garage with all the details around the windows , so it looks like it matches the house.....That my winter project to create all the wood details.

There are alot of old houses in our neighborhood....and everyone keeps most of them up to date and looking pretty good....
WNY
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90K, Leisure Line Hyfire I
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, LL & CoalTrol
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Hyfire I, VF3000 Soon

Re: Old Houses

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:06 am

coaledsweat wrote:I grew up in a 1765 hip roof colonial, it was the Glebe house for a church down the road. Massive post and beam construction. I remember it was impossible to drive a spike into the beams in the attic they were so hard. Every single one would bend. I'll try to scan some pics if I can find some. It has two huge chimneys, a monster fireplace and Dutch Oven in the great room.


I would like to see the oics. I have the same situation here, the timbers are hand hewn with wooden pegs. It is almost impossible to drive a nail into them. When I was running wiring on the cellar the cable staples would just bend. I had to skip those timbers and drive them into the beams that were added later. I've also found some timbers that still have bark on them here and there.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Termites Love Old Houses

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Mon Dec 10, 2007 12:17 pm

Some of the damage I have repaired.
I'm using the Spectracide spikes in the ground all around the house. I have become an expert on termites.
I can't find any after pictures of the repair, I know I have them. I'll post them later.
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Corner of front porch, rotten wood all removed. Photos taken 04/23/05
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Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert